502

I am trying to append a string to a log file. However writeFile will erase the content each time before writing the string.

fs.writeFile('log.txt', 'Hello Node', function (err) {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log('It\'s saved!');
}); // => message.txt erased, contains only 'Hello Node'

Any idea how to do this the easy way?

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16 Answers 16

790

For occasional appends, you can use appendFile, which creates a new file handle each time it's called:

Asynchronously:

const fs = require('fs');

fs.appendFile('message.txt', 'data to append', function (err) {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log('Saved!');
});

Synchronously:

const fs = require('fs');

fs.appendFileSync('message.txt', 'data to append');

But if you append repeatedly to the same file, it's much better to reuse the file handle.

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  • 6
    Since Node v0.8.0 – denysonique Jun 29 '12 at 19:09
  • 59
    Does anyone know if fs.appendFile keeps a link to the file open so appends are faster? (rather than open/close each write) nodejs.org/api/… – nelsonic Oct 30 '12 at 14:16
  • 7
    In case it's handy: Note that this is async. This can result in weird timing and other things. Ex: if you have process.exit() just after fs.appendFile, you may exit before the output is sent. (Using return is fine.) – SilentSteel Aug 15 '14 at 21:35
  • 6
    Worse case, you can use the synchronous version, appendFileSync. nodejs.org/api/… But you may lose one of the great benefits of Node, which is async operations. Make sure you catch errors. Perhaps on some OSes, you can get access denied if requesting the file handle at the same time. Not sure about that. – SilentSteel Dec 1 '14 at 3:30
  • 5
    @chrisdew Thanks for the update.. but... if we are not to use the accepted answer here, what are we supposed to do? How did you solve this dilema? – zipzit Mar 7 '16 at 10:33
212

When you want to write in a log file, i.e. appending data to the end of a file, never use appendFile. appendFile opens a file handle for each piece of data you add to your file, after a while you get a beautiful EMFILE error.

I can add that appendFile is not easier to use than a WriteStream.

Example with appendFile:

console.log(new Date().toISOString());
[...Array(10000)].forEach( function (item,index) {
    fs.appendFile("append.txt", index+ "\n", function (err) {
        if (err) console.log(err);
    });
});
console.log(new Date().toISOString());

Up to 8000 on my computer, you can append data to the file, then you obtain this:

{ Error: EMFILE: too many open files, open 'C:\mypath\append.txt'
    at Error (native)
  errno: -4066,
  code: 'EMFILE',
  syscall: 'open',
  path: 'C:\\mypath\\append.txt' }

Moreover, appendFile will write when it is enabled, so your logs will not be written by timestamp. You can test with example, set 1000 in place of 100000, order will be random, depends on access to file.

If you want to append to a file, you must use a writable stream like this:

var stream = fs.createWriteStream("append.txt", {flags:'a'});
console.log(new Date().toISOString());
[...Array(10000)].forEach( function (item,index) {
    stream.write(index + "\n");
});
console.log(new Date().toISOString());
stream.end();

You end it when you want. You are not even required to use stream.end(), default option is AutoClose:true, so your file will end when your process ends and you avoid opening too many files.

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  • 1
    This is spot on. – Pogrindis Mar 27 '18 at 15:11
  • 3
    Thanks for the great answer, but my doubt is that due to asynchronous nature of Javascript, it will execute stream.end() before the stream.write(), so we shouldn't use stream.end(), also as you mentioned that AutoClose:True is a default option then why bother writing a line which is of no use. – Aashish Kumar May 7 '18 at 19:08
  • 13
    due to asynchronous nature of Javascript... What? Array.forEach is a synchronous operation. JS is synchronous. It just happens to provide some ways to manage asynchronous operations, like Promises and async/await. – Sharcoux Nov 28 '18 at 13:10
  • 1
    I'd guess fs.appendFile result in too many open files because you execute it in asynchronous manner (you're just asynchronously creating 10000 file handle), I believe appendFileSync would not have similar problem, also not fs.appendFile with proper interval (1s is probably more than enough) or queueing. – apple apple May 22 '19 at 16:27
  • 1
    @RedwolfPrograms For busy server log, maybe true. For one-time per execution log, maybe not. Anyway, I just state that the point (at least the reason) in this answer is not correct. – apple apple Oct 11 '19 at 7:44
122

Your code using createWriteStream creates a file descriptor for every write. log.end is better because it asks node to close immediately after the write.

var fs = require('fs');
var logStream = fs.createWriteStream('log.txt', {flags: 'a'});
// use {flags: 'a'} to append and {flags: 'w'} to erase and write a new file
logStream.write('Initial line...');
logStream.end('this is the end line');
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  • 6
    missing first line! should be 'var fs = require('fs');' – Stormbytes Apr 9 '15 at 4:10
  • 5
    Or perhaps even better var fs = require('graceful-fs'), which hashed out some known problems. See the docs for more info. – Marko Bonaci May 27 '15 at 13:16
  • 3
    Both the initial and end line are on the same line though :-p – binki Dec 13 '16 at 6:25
  • 5
    Please note: If you are using fs.createWriteStream, then use flags. If you are using fs.writeFile then it's flag. Please refer Node JS Docs - File System for more information. – Anish Nair Aug 9 '17 at 6:39
  • 2
    Be careful! The parameter is not "flags" but "flag" (singular): nodejs.org/api/… – Benny Neugebauer Feb 24 '18 at 15:31
25

Besides appendFile, you can also pass a flag in writeFile to append data to an existing file.

fs.writeFile('log.txt', 'Hello Node',  {'flag':'a'},  function(err) {
    if (err) {
        return console.error(err);
    }
});

By passing flag 'a', data will be appended at the end of the file.

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  • 3
    Please note: If you are using fs.createWriteStream, then use flags. If you are using fs.writeFile then it's flag. Please refer Node JS Docs - File System for more information. – Anish Nair Aug 9 '17 at 6:42
19

You need to open it, then write to it.

var fs = require('fs'), str = 'string to append to file';
fs.open('filepath', 'a', 666, function( e, id ) {
  fs.write( id, 'string to append to file', null, 'utf8', function(){
    fs.close(id, function(){
      console.log('file closed');
    });
  });
});

Here's a few links that will help explain the parameters

open
write
close


EDIT: This answer is no longer valid, look into the new fs.appendFile method for appending.

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  • 1
    look like supercobra constantly writes log to the log file, usage of fs.write is not recommended in this case, use fs.createWriteStream instead. Read nodejs.org/docs/v0.4.8/api/all.html#fs.write – angry kiwi Jun 27 '11 at 9:33
  • 10
    The answer is no longer accurate as of nodejs v0.4.10. – Ruben Tan Sep 15 '11 at 4:36
  • it should be '0666' rather than 666. – Ya Zhuang Nov 2 '12 at 16:10
13

Node.js 0.8 has fs.appendFile:

fs.appendFile('message.txt', 'data to append', (err) => {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log('The "data to append" was appended to file!');
});

Documentation

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3
fd = fs.openSync(path.join(process.cwd(), 'log.txt'), 'a')
fs.writeSync(fd, 'contents to append')
fs.closeSync(fd)
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  • 5
    anything sync() is almost always a bad idea unless you're 100% sure you absolutely NEED it. Even then, you're probably doing it wrong. – Zane Claes Oct 14 '12 at 0:45
  • 4
    Doesn't mean it's wrong. It just does it Synchronously. Might not be best practice for Node.js, but it's supported. – Luis R. Nov 17 '12 at 20:43
  • 2
    I was using "ur doin it wrong" in the colloquial internet-meme sense of the phrase. Obviously it's supported =P – Zane Claes Nov 17 '12 at 21:52
  • 7
    Agreed on async, but sometimes if you're just writing an interactive script, sync is fine. – bryanmac Mar 13 '14 at 12:55
  • 6
    Writing synchronously is absolutely ok if you are doing single user command line app (e.g. script to do some stuff). That way it is faster to do stuff. Why would node have sync methods if not for this purpose? – Jan Święcki May 16 '14 at 13:06
3

If you want an easy and stress-free way to write logs line by line in a file, then I recommend fs-extra:

const os = require('os');
const fs = require('fs-extra');

const file = 'logfile.txt';
const options = {flag: 'a'};

async function writeToFile(text) {
  await fs.outputFile(file, `${text}${os.EOL}`, options);
}

writeToFile('First line');
writeToFile('Second line');
writeToFile('Third line');
writeToFile('Fourth line');
writeToFile('Fifth line');

Tested with Node v8.9.4.

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1

I offer this suggestion only because control over open flags is sometimes useful, for example, you may want to truncate it an existing file first and then append a series of writes to it - in which case use the 'w' flag when opening the file and don't close it until all the writes are done. Of course appendFile may be what you're after :-)

  fs.open('log.txt', 'a', function(err, log) {
    if (err) throw err;
    fs.writeFile(log, 'Hello Node', function (err) {
      if (err) throw err;
      fs.close(log, function(err) {
        if (err) throw err;
        console.log('It\'s saved!');
      });
    });
  });
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1

Using jfile package :

myFile.text+='\nThis is new line to be appended'; //myFile=new JFile(path);
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1

Using fs.appendFile or fsPromises.appendFile are the fastest and the most robust options when you need to append something to a file.

In contrast to some of the answers suggested, if the file path is supplied to the appendFile function, It actually closes by itself. Only when you pass in a filehandle that you get by something like fs.open() you have to take care of closing it.

I tried it with over 50,000 lines in a file.

Examples :

(async () => {
  // using appendFile.
  const fsp = require('fs').promises;
  await fsp.appendFile(
    '/path/to/file', '\r\nHello world.'
  );

  // using apickfs; handles error and edge cases better.
  const apickFileStorage = require('apickfs');
  await apickFileStorage.writeLines(
    '/path/to/directory/', 'filename', 'Hello world.'
  );
})();

enter image description here

Ref: https://github.com/nodejs/node/issues/7560
Example Execution: https://github.com/apickjs/apickFS/blob/master/writeLines.js

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1

My approach is rather special. I basically use the WriteStream solution but without actually 'closing' the fd by using stream.end(). Instead I use cork/uncork. This got the benefit of low RAM usage (if that matters to anyone) and I believe it's more safe to use for logging/recording (my original use case).

Following is a pretty simple example. Notice I just added a pseudo for loop for showcase -- in production code I am waiting for websocket messages.

var stream = fs.createWriteStream("log.txt", {flags:'a'});
for(true) {
  stream.cork();
  stream.write("some content to log");
  process.nextTick(() => stream.uncork());
}

uncork will flush the data to the file in the next tick.

In my scenario there are peaks of up to ~200 writes per second in various sizes. During night time however only a handful writes per minute are needed. The code is working super reliable even during peak times.

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0

Here's a full script. Fill in your file names and run it and it should work! Here's a video tutorial on the logic behind the script.

var fs = require('fs');

function ReadAppend(file, appendFile){
  fs.readFile(appendFile, function (err, data) {
    if (err) throw err;
    console.log('File was read');

    fs.appendFile(file, data, function (err) {
      if (err) throw err;
      console.log('The "data to append" was appended to file!');

    });
  });
}
// edit this with your file names
file = 'name_of_main_file.csv';
appendFile = 'name_of_second_file_to_combine.csv';
ReadAppend(file, appendFile);
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0

an easier way to do this is

const fs = require('fs');
fs.appendFileSync('file.txt', 'message to append into file');
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  • Easier than what? Have you checked the top answer, which gives exactly the same appendFileSync solution? – Dan Dascalescu Jun 23 '19 at 9:44
0
const inovioLogger = (logger = "") => {
    const log_file = fs.createWriteStream(__dirname + `/../../inoviopay-${new Date().toISOString().slice(0, 10)}.log`, { flags: 'a' });
    const log_stdout = process.stdout;
    log_file.write(logger + '\n');
}
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0

In addition to denysonique's answer, sometimes asynchronous type of appendFile and other async methods in NodeJS are used where promise returns instead of callback passing. To do it you need to wrap the function with promisify HOF or import async functions from promises namespace:

const { appendFile } = require('fs').promises;

await appendFile('path/to/file/to/append', dataToAppend, optionalOptions);

I hope it'll help 😉

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