5

I just got a CSV input file to be processed, which has an equal-sign before the first delimiting quote, and wondered if this is valid and has any purpose. Example (simplified):

"2"
"3"
="4"

After reading some postings like this one I experimented with a CSV like this:

"2"
"3"
="A1+A2"

and:

"2"
"3"
"=A1+A2"

It seems that both Excel and LibreOffice silently ignore the equal-sign before the quote, and nicely treat the equal-sign after the quote as the flag for a formula. However, I could not find any documentation about this.

(For Excel, this CSV needs to be saved with the .txt extension, and opened with control-O)

I am inclined to call the CSV with equal-sign before the open quote as an error that is easy to deal with when reading this file, but still wondering if there is more to say about this.

  • If you import a field value like ="A1+A2" then the cell will display A1+A2 as text while the formula (in the Formula Bar) remains ="A1+A2". If you get too adventurous with attempting to bring in formulas as a CSV field, you may run into #NAME! errors. That's not to say that formulas cannot be brought in but I've found that occasionally you need a Find & Replace for = to = to 'assert' the formula as a true formulas and not text-that-looks-like-a-formula. – user4039065 Jan 4 '16 at 16:56
9

This is used by Excel to avoid the loss of leading zero's.

For example, if you have a field in your csv file like this: 0123456, Excel will treat it as a number and lose the leading zero.

Saving it as ="0123456" solves this problem.

Using "0123456" won't help either, because quotes are not there to indicate a text field, but to escape possible delimiters inside fields.

Just like having sep=; on the first line to make Excel use the right seperator, the ="" is also 'non-standard', or better: Excel specific, because there is no real standard for csv files.

  • 1
    Excellent! That is even more a feature than just treating a number as a string – Roland Jan 4 '16 at 17:16
4

There is no official standard for CSV. As it says at Comma-separated values,

An official standard for the CSV file format does not exist, but RFC 4180 provides a de facto standard for many aspects of it.

Looking at the RFC 4180, a field is either escaped or non-escaped. The escaped field has a BNF defined like this:

escaped = DQUOTE *(TEXTDATA / COMMA / CR / LF / 2DQUOTE) DQUOTE

Since the equals sign is not a part of the escaped characters, it may be like the "Free Parking" in Monopoly: The rules say nothing regarding it, but the de facto standard is to place $500 under it.

3

Excel isn't ignoring = in ="4" or ="A1 + A2", it is treating it as a constant formula.

If you open the csv file that looks like:

"2"
"3"
="4"
="A1+A2"
"=A1+A2"

in Excel the result looks like:

enter image description here

Note how A3 holds the formula ="4" rather than just the number 4.

  • Hard to decide which answer is better, I chose the other, but yours is very useful. +1 – Roland Jan 4 '16 at 17:08
  • No problem, I also upvoted the accepted answer -- the link to the standard was helpful. – John Coleman Jan 4 '16 at 17:09
  • I noted also that A3 is left aligned like a string, because the formula returns a string – Roland Jan 5 '16 at 10:20
1

If you have a .csv file with the following contents:

"2"
"3"
="4"

and open it in Excel, you will see:

enter image description here

As you see. Excel discards the double quotes on the first two items and converts the third item into a formula.

That is how Excel functions.

If you want to get the the exact text into Excel (retaining the double quotes) you could use a macro.

  • Thanks. Like others just said, the = starts a formula with the effect that the numeric content is treated like a string. – Roland Jan 4 '16 at 17:13

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