7

I completed my home work and got perfect result. But i just want to check , is this the best way to create singleton instances or is their any other way:

I created a singleton object using the module pattern (closures) as, "app.js"

var singleton1 = require('./singletonUser1');
console.dir(singleton1.getlocalvariable());
singleton1.setlocalvariable(20);
console.dir(singleton1.getlocalvariable());

var singleton2 = require('./singletonUser2');
console.dir(singleton2.getlocalvariable());
singleton2.setlocalvariable(30);
console.dir(singleton.getlocalvariable());

Actual singleton object (singleton.js):

var singleton = (function () {
    var localvariable = 10;

    return {
        getlocalvariable: function () {
            console.dir('This is getInstance');
            return localvariable;
        },
        setlocalvariable: function (value) {
            console.dir('This is setlocalvariable');
            localvariable = value;
        },
    };
})();

module.exports = singleton;

Then Singleton object user 1 (singletonUser1.js):

var singletonUser1 = (function () {
    var singleton = require('./singleton');

    return {
        getlocalvariable: function () {
            console.dir('This is singletonUser1---getlocalvariable');
            return singleton.getlocalvariable();
        },
        setlocalvariable: function (value) {
            console.dir('This is singletonUser1---setlocalvariable');
            singleton.setlocalvariable(value);
        },
    };
})();

module.exports = singletonUser1;

Singleton Object User 2 (singletonUser2.js)

var singletonUser2 = (function () {
    var singleton = require('./singleton');

    return {
        getlocalvariable: function () {
            console.dir('This is singletonUser2222---getlocalvariable');
            return singleton.getlocalvariable();
        },
        setlocalvariable: function (value) {
            console.dir('This is singletonUser22222---setlocalvariable');
            singleton.setlocalvariable(value);
        },
    };
})();
module.exports = singletonUser2;

Please consider that, Single User 1 and User 2, is for a purpose according to my project, the above is just an prototype to the real world problem.

My question is, I am sure this is creating a single instance of the class (As i checked using the app.js above). But is this the best way?

19
  • You may have more luck posting this at codereview.stackexchange.com, since you're not asking to solve a problem.
    – gantoine
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 2:07
  • @ArcaneCraeda yes you are right i am not asking to solve the problem, i will try to post code review forum. But, my request is to know, is their a better approach then using the closures and also want to know some debugging techniques like, how to verify how many instances of particular objects are their at runtime. Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 2:15
  • No problem in asking that, it's just that CodeReview is there for that specific reason. You might get answers here, but you will have more luck and better ones over there!
    – gantoine
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 2:16
  • This would not be good for Code Review as it is not real, implemented code, but rather is hypothetical. This would get closed on CR for that reason.
    – Phrancis
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 2:16
  • @Phrancis Ah, good point. I retract my statement then.
    – gantoine
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 2:21

3 Answers 3

5

var Singleton = (function(){
  function Singleton(){
    this.localVariable = 5;
  }

  // Object can have instance methods as usually.
  Singleton.prototype.getLocalVariable = function() {
    return this.localVariable;
  };

  var instance;

  return function() {
    if (!instance) {
      instance = new Singleton();
    }
    return instance;
  };
})();


var instance1 = new Singleton();
var instance2 = new Singleton();

console.log(instance1 === instance2); // true

console.log(instance1.localVariable, instance2.localVariable); // 5 5

instance1.localVariable = 20;
console.log(instance1.localVariable, instance2.localVariable); // 20 20

console.log(instance1.getLocalVariable()); // 20

1
  • This is probably closer to what the homework assignment is after
    – vol7ron
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 5:48
1

this is my configurable singleton for a service

function AdService(name) {
    console.log('new instance created');
    this.name = name || 'defaultName';
    this.greet = function () {
        console.log('hi ' + this.name);
    }
};

function Singleton() {
    this.instance = null;
    this.getInstance = function getInstance(name) {
        if (!this.instance)
            this.instance = new AdService(name);

        return this.instance;
    }
}

var singleton = new Singleton();

module.exports = function (name) {
    return singleton.getInstance(name);
}

0

I find singleton class in JavaScript bit wobbly, in java it is quite clear, i.e whenever you create an object of a class, you get the same object, but in JS, (at least IMO) there is no true class to begin with.( nope, ES6 classes don't count, answer this, can you have private attributes in that?)

You code just does a closure, it might well have been the below code and made no difference:

var localvariable = 10;

function getlocalvariable() {
    console.dir('This is getInstance');
    return localvariable;
};
function setlocalvariable(value) {
    console.dir('This is setlocalvariable');
    localvariable = value;
};
module.exports = {
  getlocalvariable: getlocalvariable,
  setlocalvariable: setlocalvariable
};

that said, end of day, Singleton is just a pattern, how we implement depends on us, nothing particularly wrong with the way you did.

Edit: A singleton implementation by someone who knows JS better than me (taken from Learning JavaScript Design Patterns)

var mySingleton = (function () {

  // Instance stores a reference to the Singleton
  var instance;

  function init() {

    // Singleton

    // Private methods and variables
    function privateMethod(){
        console.log( "I am private" );
    }

    var privateVariable = "Im also private";

    var privateRandomNumber = Math.random();

    return {

      // Public methods and variables
      publicMethod: function () {
        console.log( "The public can see me!" );
      },

      publicProperty: "I am also public",

      getRandomNumber: function() {
        return privateRandomNumber;
      }

    };

  };

  return {

    // Get the Singleton instance if one exists
    // or create one if it doesn't
    getInstance: function () {

      if ( !instance ) {
        instance = init();
      }

      return instance;
    }

  };

})();

var myBadSingleton = (function () {

  // Instance stores a reference to the Singleton
  var instance;

  function init() {

    // Singleton

    var privateRandomNumber = Math.random();

    return {

      getRandomNumber: function() {
        return privateRandomNumber;
      }

    };

  };

  return {

    // Always create a new Singleton instance
    getInstance: function () {

      instance = init();

      return instance;
    }

  };

})();


// Usage:

var singleA = mySingleton.getInstance();
var singleB = mySingleton.getInstance();
console.log( singleA.getRandomNumber() === singleB.getRandomNumber() ); // true

var badSingleA = myBadSingleton.getInstance();
var badSingleB = myBadSingleton.getInstance();
console.log( badSingleA.getRandomNumber() !== badSingleB.getRandomNumber() ); // true

// Note: as we are working with random numbers, there is a
// mathematical possibility both numbers will be the same,
// however unlikely. The above example should otherwise still
// be valid.
7
  • You can have private attributes (variables) in JavaScript, it's just not the syntax that you're familiar with: javascript.crockford.com/private.html - and this is old. But also: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/Add-ons/SDK/Guides/…
    – vol7ron
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 5:50
  • @vol7ron, I was talking about private attributes in ES6 classes :)
    – mido
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 5:53
  • There's no keyword, as you'd expect in Java or C, but there is still that method described above, which has the same affect (variables hidden behind closures). There are other proposals to improve the ECMAScript 6 syntax, but like you said, none currently have an easy implementation of privatized attributes/methods -- certainly nothing that is easily readable.
    – vol7ron
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 5:59
  • @vol7ron nope, I am saying that there is no way to write pure ES6 class with private attributes...
    – mido
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 6:04
  • 1
    I don't understand how to answer your question. I would say easily. There are different examples online, many use WeakMaps. Here's one: reddit.com/r/javascript/comments/3ezig4/… But I concur, privatization is problematic and needs more emphasis.
    – vol7ron
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 6:23

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