49

I am a beginner in React JS and would like to develop a react router based navigation for my Dashboard. The mockup is as follows:

Mockup

My app.js code which I created to try routing is as follows:

import React from 'react'
import { render } from 'react-dom'
import { Router, Route, Link } from 'react-router'
import Login from './components/Login.js';

const App = React.createClass({
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <h1>App</h1>
        <ul>
          <li><Link to="/login">Login</Link></li>
          <li><Link to="/inbox">Inbox</Link></li>
        </ul>
        {this.props.children}
      </div>
    )
  }
})


render((
  <li>
  <Router>
    <Route path="/" component={App}>
      <Route path="login" component={Login} />
    </Route>
  </Router>
  </li>
), document.getElementById('placeholder'))

How do I create the navigation as shown in the mockup ?

  • What is the question? Do you want to know how to create a component? What does routing have to do with that? – Daniel B Jan 5 '16 at 10:59
  • 2
    I would like to create the navigation using react router as mentioned in the mockup. – KarthikJ Jan 5 '16 at 17:06
  • 1
    Have you tried Google? Your question doesn't have a specific problem that can be solved but instead a very general problem. Just look up how to create a component and you're good to go! – Daniel B Jan 5 '16 at 18:11
  • take a look at npmjs.com/package/react-nav-bar it might make your life a little easier – Neta Meta Jun 30 '16 at 20:42
42

Yes, Daniel is correct, but to expand upon his answer, your primary app component would need to have a navbar component within it. That way, when you render the primary app (any page under the '/' path), it would also display the navbar. I am guessing that you wouldn't want your login page to display the navbar, so that shouldn't be a nested component, and should instead be by itself. So your routes would end up looking something like this:

<Router>
  <Route path="/" component={App}>
    <Route path="page1" component={Page1} />
    <Route path="page2" component={Page2} />
  </Route>
  <Route path="/login" component={Login} />
</Router>

And the other components would look something like this:

var NavBar = React.createClass({
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <ul>
          <a onClick={() => history.push('page1') }>Page 1</a>
          <a onClick={() => history.push('page2') }>Page 2</a>
        </ul>
      </div>
    )
  }
});

var App = React.createClass({
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <NavBar />
        <div>Other Content</div>
        {this.props.children}
      </div>
    )
  }
});
  • 23
    Why use history.push instead of <Link>? – Erwin Mayer Oct 26 '16 at 7:38
  • where does history get loaded in? – Matt Catellier Dec 6 '16 at 16:23
  • react-router builds on history, so it enters the scene with this line import { Router, Route, Link } from 'react-router'. Instead of using history.push for the links explicitly, you could also use react-router's <Link> element. – martin-martin Sep 16 '17 at 19:40
41

Note The accepted is perfectly fine - but wanted to add a version4 example because they are different enough.

Nav.js

  import React from 'react';
  import { Link } from 'react-router';

  export default class Nav extends React.Component {
    render() {    
      return (
        <nav className="Nav">
          <div className="Nav__container">
            <Link to="/" className="Nav__brand">
              <img src="logo.svg" className="Nav__logo" />
            </Link>

            <div className="Nav__right">
              <ul className="Nav__item-wrapper">
                <li className="Nav__item">
                  <Link className="Nav__link" to="/path1">Link 1</Link>
                </li>
                <li className="Nav__item">
                  <Link className="Nav__link" to="/path2">Link 2</Link>
                </li>
                <li className="Nav__item">
                  <Link className="Nav__link" to="/path3">Link 3</Link>
                </li>
              </ul>
            </div>
          </div>
        </nav>
      );
    }
  }

App.js

  import React from 'react';
  import { Link, Switch, Route } from 'react-router';
  import Nav from './nav';
  import Page1 from './page1';
  import Page2 from './page2';
  import Page3 from './page3';

  export default class App extends React.Component {
    render() {    
      return (
        <div className="App">
          <Router>
            <div>
              <Nav />
              <Switch>
                <Route exactly component={Landing} pattern="/" />
                <Route exactly component={Page1} pattern="/path1" />
                <Route exactly component={Page2} pattern="/path2" />
                <Route exactly component={Page3} pattern="/path3" />
                <Route component={Page404} />
              </Switch>
            </div>
          </Router>
        </div>
      );
    }
  }

Alternatively, if you want a more dynamic nav, you can look at the excellent v4 docs: https://reacttraining.com/react-router/web/example/sidebar

Edit

A few people have asked about a page without the Nav, such as a login page. I typically approach it with a wrapper Route component

  import React from 'react';
  import { Link, Switch, Route } from 'react-router';
  import Nav from './nav';
  import Page1 from './page1';
  import Page2 from './page2';
  import Page3 from './page3';

  const NavRoute = ({exact, path, component: Component}) => (
    <Route exact={exact} path={path} render={(props) => (
      <div>
        <Header/>
        <Component {...props}/>
      </div>
    )}/>
  )

  export default class App extends React.Component {
    render() {    
      return (
        <div className="App">
          <Router>
              <Switch>
                <NavRoute exactly component={Landing} pattern="/" />
                <Route exactly component={Login} pattern="/login" />
                <NavRoute exactly component={Page1} pattern="/path1" />
                <NavRoute exactly component={Page2} pattern="/path2" />
                <NavRoute component={Page404} />
              </Switch>
          </Router>
        </div>
      );
    }
  }
  • 3
    The current v4 router only allows a single child. I fixed this in my app by wrapping the Router Nav/Switch children with a single <div/>. I then had to put Nav into a <Route/> before Switch so it would receive route props history,match, and location. Please update your answer. – Glenn Aug 12 '17 at 17:13
  • 6
    How does this work if you have a login page? Probably don't want a navbar showing up on the login page. is there a way around this? – Chad Greenburg Jan 9 '18 at 3:28
  • @ChadGreenburg Could you ask a seperate question and link it here - it would be too difficult to answer in comments – Chris Jan 25 '18 at 6:49
  • how do i set conditional 'active' class in nav bar? – Shekhar Joshi Apr 15 '18 at 20:09
  • 1
    @Si8 I think I would make a landing route. For example: <Route exactly component={Landing} pattern="/" /> – Chris Jul 8 '19 at 5:19

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