49

What is the correct way of unit testing a service returning an Observable result in Angular 2? Let's say we have a getCars method in a CarService service class:

...
export class CarService{
    ...
    getCars():Observable<any>{
        return this.http.get("http://someurl/cars").map( res => res.json() );
    }
    ...
}

If I try to write the tests in the following way I get the warning: 'SPEC HAS NO EXPECTATIONS':

it('retrieves all the cars', inject( [CarService], ( carService ) => {
     carService.getCars().subscribe( result => {         
         expect(result.length).toBeGreaterThan(0);
     } );       
}) );

Using injectAsync does not help because it works with Promise objects as far as I could see.

  • The other problem is when getCars doesn't emit any values(for whatever reason) test passes(since there are no expect checks!) – Wildhammer Jul 3 '19 at 20:01
59

The correct way for Angular (ver. 2+):

it('retrieves all the cars', async(inject( [CarService], ( carService ) => {
     carService.getCars().subscribe(result => expect(result.length).toBeGreaterThan(0)); 
}));

Async Observables vs Sync Observables

It is important to understand that Observables can be either synchronous or asynchronous.

In your specific example the Observable is asynchronous (it wraps an http call).
Therefore you have to use async function that executes the code inside its body in a special async test zone. It intercepts and keeps track of all promises created in its body, making it possible to expect test results upon completion of an asynchronous action.

However, if your Observable was a synchronous one, for example:

...
export class CarService{
    ...
    getCars():Observable<any>{
        return Observable.of(['car1', 'car2']);
    }
    ...

you wouldn't have needed async function and your test would become simply

it('retrieves all the cars', inject( [CarService], ( carService ) => {
     carService.getCars().subscribe(result => expect(result.length).toBeGreaterThan(0)); 
});

Marbles

Another thing to consider when testing Observables in general and Angular in particular is marble testing.

Your example is pretty simple, but usually the logic is more complex than just calling http service and testing this logic becomes a headache.
Marbles make the test very short, simple and comprehensive (it is especially useful for testing ngrx effects).

If you're using Jasmine you can use jasmine-marbles, for Jest there is jest-marbles, but if you prefer something else, there is rxjs-marbles, that should be compatible with any test framework.

Here is a great example for reproducing and fixing a race condition with marbles.


Official guide for testing

  • 2
    So, I found that if I do this, then specify another test later, depending on the order the tests run in the subscription from the other test is still active. What is the right way to address that? Unsubscribe at the end of the lambda function? – theMayer May 31 '18 at 15:04
  • 1
    Note that async in jasmine is supported starting from 2.7.0 – Pieter De Bie Jul 12 '18 at 11:45
  • 1
    @PieterDeBie you're mixing async keyword (that is indeed supported starting from Jasmine 2.7.0) and async function from Angular testing utilities (import { async } from '@angular/core/testing';). In this particular example it is the latter. – JeB Jul 13 '18 at 10:06
  • 1
    As I said, you're talking about async/await: jasmine.github.io/tutorials/async. This is Javascript feature, not Jasmine: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…. The only reason it is supported in Jasmine 2.7 is because Promises are supported in 2.7. Here we're talking about different case - Observables, and Angular has a special function called async which allows you testing asynchronous Observables. – JeB Jul 14 '18 at 7:24
  • 1
    async as a keyword seemed to had fixed my particular case, but you are completely right. – Pieter De Bie Jul 19 '18 at 7:48
10

Finally I end with a working example. Observable class has a method toPromise that converts an Observable to a Promise object. The correct way should be:

it('retrieves all the cars', injectAsync( [CarService], ( carService ) => {
  return carService.getCars().toPromise().then( (result) => {         
     expect(result.length).toBeGreaterThan(0);
  } );       
}) );

But while to above code works with any Observable object, I still have the problem with the Observables returned from Http requests which is probably a bug. Here is a plunker demonstrating the case above: http://plnkr.co/edit/ak2qZH685QzTN6RoK71H?p=preview

Update:
As of version beta.14 it seems to work properly with the provided solution.

  • I think its because the Promise will not resolve if the Observable sequence is empty at the moment you call toPromise(). github.com/Reactive-Extensions/RxJS/blob/master/doc/api/core/… – philipooo Jan 29 '16 at 16:23
  • I am not much experienced with this Promise and Observable stuff but if I log something to console, I see that the promise resolves and logs to console at some point. – Erdinc Guzel Feb 5 '16 at 9:58
6

https://angular.io/guide/testing currently shows a few ways. Here is one:

it('#getObservableValue should return value from observable',
    (done: DoneFn) => {
       service.getObservableValue().subscribe(value => {
       expect(value).toBe('observable value');
       done();
    });
});
  • Even this method works, but I think using async() is the better way. – Paul Richard Jul 25 '19 at 7:17
1

AsyncTestCompleter is deprecated https://github.com/angular/angular/issues/5443. injectAsync replaced it https://github.com/angular/angular/issues/4715#issuecomment-149288405
but injectAsync is now also deprecated
injectAsync is not deprecated anymore https://github.com/angular/angular/pull/5721 (see also comment from @ErdincGuzel)

it('retrieves all the cars', injectAsync( [CarService], ( carService ) => {
     var c = PromiseWrapper.completer();
     carService.getCars().subscribe( result => {         
         expect(result.length).toBeGreaterThan(0);
         c.resolve();
     } ); 
     return c.promise;      
}) );
  • I had seen the examples of AsyncTestCompleter in angular repo but it seems like AsyncTestCompleter is internal to angular and not found in public API. – Erdinc Guzel Jan 6 '16 at 7:28
  • I updated my answer. I haven't tried this because I don't use TS myself. – Günter Zöchbauer Jan 6 '16 at 14:32
  • The updated answer does not work unfortunately. inject method does not allow to return Promise values. By the way the injectAsync is again undeprecated with #5721 – Erdinc Guzel Jan 7 '16 at 9:28

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