1

My 'Headers.h' file includes basic c++ Headers

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
// and many header files.

wrote a function definition for file exist check and saved it in 'common_utility.h' - ifFileExist()

common_utility.h

bool ifFileExist()
{
   // ... My code
}

Wrote code for Class A classA.h

class A
{
// Contains class A Declarations.

};

classA.cpp

// Contains
#include "Headers.h"
#include "common_utility.h"
#include "classA.h"

// class A Method definition

Wrote Code for Class B I am using class A in Class B.

classB.h

 class B
    {
// Contains class A Declarations.
}

classB.cpp

// Contains
#include "Headers.h"
#include "common_utility.h"
#include "classA.h"
#include "classB.h"

// class B Method definition
// calling the function ifFileExist() in class B also.

wrote code for main program main.cpp

// Contains
#include "Headers.h"
#include "common_utility.h"
#include "classA.h"
#include "classB.h"

// I am using class A and Class B in main program
// calling the function ifFileExist() in Main program also.

When I compile the whole program as

g++ -std=c++0x classA.cpp classB.cpp main.cpp -o main

I am getting the following error.

In function ifFileExist()': classB.cpp:(.text+0x0): multiple definition ofifFileExist()' /tmp/ccHkDT11.o:classA.cpp:(.text+0x2b6e): first defined here

So I decleard ifFileExist() function in Headers.h as extern.

extern bool ifFileExist();

But still I am getting the same error.

I am including 'Headers.h' in every .cpp file. That file contains basic c++ libraries. But I didn't get any mulitple definition error for that header files. But only in my own function, I am getting the error 'multiple definition'.

I want to use 'common_utility.h' file, when ever I need to use it. If I doesn't need to use the common_utility functions in my main program, simply I should not include it.

I want my program to run in the every following cases.

g++ -std=c++0x classA.cpp main.cpp -o main
g++ -std=c++0x classB.cpp> main.cpp -o main
g++ -std=c++0x classA.cpp classB.cpp main.cpp -o main

I shouldn't get mulitple definition error at any cases. What Should I do now?

  • 1
    Looked for a duplicate questions for ODR and couldn't find any good one. I am sure it exists, may be someone can find it? – SergeyA Jan 5 '16 at 14:57
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Multple c++ files causes "multiple definition" error? – BlackDwarf Jan 5 '16 at 15:07
  • 1
    Since I didn't find a good duplicate, I will write up something myself. – SergeyA Jan 5 '16 at 15:15
  • 1
    Did you use include guards in your header file? – Jepessen Jan 5 '16 at 16:40
13

Since I could not find any complete (in my view) duplicate for this question, I am going to write a (hopefully) authoritive and complete answer.

What is One Definition Rule and why should I care

A One Definition Rule, usually dubbed ODR, is a rule which states (simplified) that any entity (informal term) used in the program should be defined once, and only once. An entity which is defined more than once is often causing a compilation or linker error, but sometimes can be left undetected by the compiler and lead to very hard-to-trace bugs.

I am not going to formally define entity here, but one can think of it as a function, variable or class. Before going further, one should very clear understand the difference between definition and declaration in C++, since while double definition is prohibited, double declaration is usually unavoidable.

Definition vs. declaration

Every entity used in the code should be declared in the given translation unit (translation unit is usually a cpp source file together with all header files included in it, directly or indirectly through other header files). The way an entitty is declared differes based on the entity itself. See below on how to declare different types of entities. Entities are often declared in header files. Since most complex application has more than one translation unit in it (more than one cpp file), and different cpp files often include the same headers, an application is likely to have multiple declarations for many entities used. Like I said above, this is not a problem.

Every entity used in the application, must be defined once and only once. The term 'application' is used a bit loosely here - for example, libraries (both static and dynamic) can have entities (at this point usually called symbols) left undefined within them, and an executable which was linked to use a dynamic library can have a symbol undefined as well. Instead, I refer to the application is an ultimate running something, after all the libraries have been statically or dynamically linked into it, and symbols resolved.

It is also worth noting that every definition serves as a declaration as well, meaning, that whenever you define something, you are also declaring the same thing.

As with declaration, the way to define an entity differes by the type of entity. Here is how one can declare/define 3 basic types of entities - variables, classes and functions - based on it's type.

Variables

Variables are declared using following construct:

extern int x;

This declares a variable x. It does not define it! A following piece of code will be compiled OK, but an attempt to link it without any other input files (for example, with g++ main.cpp) will produce a link-time error due to undefined symbols:

extern int x;
int main() {
    return x;
}

The following piece of code defines variable x:

int x;

If this single line were to be put into file x.cpp, and this file compiled/linked together with main.cpp from above with g++ x.cpp main.cpp -o test it would compile and link without problems. You could even run resulting executable, and if you are to check exit code after the executable was run, you'd notice it is 0. (Since global variable x would be default-initialized to 0).

Functions

Functions are declared by providing their prototypes. A typical function declaration looks like following:

double foo(int x, double y);

This construct declares a function foo, returning double and accepting two arguments - one of type int, another of type double. This declaration can appear multiple times.

Following code defines above mentioned foo:

void foo(int x, double y) {
    return x * y;
}

This definition can only appear once in the whole application.

Function definition has an additional quirk to variable definition. If above definition of foo were to put into header file foo.h, which in turn would be included by two cpp files 1.cpp and 2.cpp, which are compiled/linked together with g++ 1.cpp 2.cpp -o test you would have a linker error, saying that foo() is defined twice. This might be prevented by using following form of foo declaration:

inline void foo(int x, double y) {
    return x * y;
}

Note inline there. What it tells compiler is that foo can be included by multiple .cpp files, and this inclusion should not produce linker error. Compiler have several options on how to make this happen, but it can be relied upon to do it's job. Note, it would still be an error to have this definition twice in the same translation unit! For example, following code will produce a compiler error

inline void foo() { }
inline void foo() { }

It is worth noting, that any class method defined within the class is implictly inline, for example:

class A {
public:
    int foo() { return 42; }
};

Here A::foo() is defined inline.

Classess

Classess are declared by following construct:

class X;

Above declaration declares class X (and at this point X is formally called an incomplete type), so that it can be used when information about it contents, such as it's size or it's members is not needed. For example:

X* p; // OK - no information about class X is actually required to define a pointer to it
p->y = 42; // Error - compiler has no idea if X has any member named `y`

void foo(X x); // OK - compiler does not need to generated any code for this

void foo(X x) { } // Error - compiler needs to know the size of X to generate code for foo to properly read it's argument
void bar(X* x) { } // OK - compiler needs not to know specifics of X for this

A definition of class is well-known to everybody, and follows this construct:

class X {
   public:
   int y;
};

This makes a class X defined, and now it can be used in any context. An important note - class definition has to be unique per tralnlation unit, but does not have to be unique per application. That is, you can have X defined only once per translation unit, but it can be used in multiple files linked together.

How to properly follow ODR rules

Whenever a same entity is defined more than once in the resulting application, so-called ODR violation happenes. Most of the time, a linker will see the violation and will complain. However, there are cases when ODR violation does not break linking and instead causes bugs. This might happen, for example, when the same .cpp file defining a global variable X is put into both application and dynamic library, which is loaded on demand (with dlopen). (Yours trully spent a couple of days trying to trace a bug happened because of that.)

A more conventional causes of ODR violations are:

Same entity defined twice in the same file in the same scope

int x;
int x; // ODR violation

void foo() {
   int x;
} // No ODR violation, foo::x is different from x in the global scope

Prevention: don't do this.

Same entity defined twice, when it was supposed to be declared

(in x.h)
int x;

(in 1.cpp)
#include <x.h>
void set_x(int y) {
   x = y;
}

(in 2.cpp)
#include <x.h>
int get_x() {
    return x;
}

While the wisdom of above code is questionable at best, in serves a point of illustrating ODR rule. In the code above, variable x is supposed to be shared between two files, 1.cpp and 2.cpp, but was coded incorrectly. Instead, the code should be following:

(in x.h)
extern int x; //declare x

(in x.xpp)
int x; // define x

// 1.cpp and 2.cpp remain the same

Prevention Know what you are doing. Declare entities when you want them declared, do not define them. If in the example above we'd use function instead of the variable, like following:

(in x.h)
int x_func() { return 42; }

We would have a problem which could be solved in two ways (as mentioned above). We could use inline function, or we could move definition to the cpp file:

(in x.h)
int x_func();

(in x.cpp)
int x_func() { return 42; } 

Same header file included twice, causing the same class defined twice This is a funny one. Imagine, you have a following code:

(in a.h)
class A { };

(in main.cpp)
#include <a.h>
#include <a.h> // compilation error!

The above code is seldom appearing as written, but it is quite easy to have the same file included twice through the intermediate:

(in foo.h)
#include <a.h>

(in main.cpp)
#include <a.h>
#include <foo.h>

Prevention Traditional solution to this is to use so-called include guards, that is, a special preprocessor definitions which would prevent the double-inclusion. In this regard, a.h should be redone as following:

(in a.h)
#ifndef INCLUDED_A_H
#define INCLUDED_A_H

class A { };

#endif

The code above will prevent inclusion of a.h into the same translation unit more than once, since INCLUDED_A_H will become defined after first inclusion, and will fail #ifndef on all subsequent ones.

Some compilers expose other ways to control inclusion, but to date include guards remain the way to do it uniformely across different compilers.

0

Before actually compiling source the compilation unit is generated from .cpp files. This basically means that all preprocessor directives are computed: all #include will be replaces with content of the included files, all #define'd values will be substituted with corresponding expressions, all #if 0 ... #endif will be removed, etc. So after this step in your case you'll get two pieces of C++ code without any preprocessor directives that will both have definition of same function bool ifFileExist() that is why you get this multiple definition error.

The fast solution is to mark it as inline bool ifFileExist(). Basically you ask compiler to replace all corresponding function calls with content of the function itself.

Another approach is to live the declaration of your function in common_utility.h and move definition to common_utility.cpp

  • 1
    The inline keyword and actual inlining are only tangentially related. It is incorrect to explain one through the other. The compiler can inline a function not declared inline, or fail to inline a function so declared. This has no effect on program semantics. – n.m. Jan 5 '16 at 16:27
  • 1
    Basically you ask compiler to replace all corresponding function calls with content of the function itself. - this plain wrong. keyword inline has nothing to do with function inlining. – SergeyA Jan 5 '16 at 18:18
-1

The easiest fix is: insert keyword inline: inline bool ifFileExist().

  • 1
    Technically correct, but not very helpful. A good answer would explain the problem, and the "usual" solution (function definition in .cpp file) as well as mentioning inline. – BoBTFish Jan 5 '16 at 14:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.