21

I have a table in postgresql. The following table "animals" will do to explain my problem:

name
------
tiger
cat
dog

Now I am using the following query:

SELECT
    array_to_string(array_agg("name"), ', ')
FROM
    animals;

The result is: "tiger, cat, dog". But I would like to sort the aggregate, before it is converted into a string. So this is the result I am hoping for:

"cat, dog, tiger".

So how can I sort an string array in postgresql 8.4 before converting it to a string. ORDER BY on the row "name" does not work and the built-in sort function processes only integer values.

Anyone a good idea, how to solve this in pure SQL?

Thanx a lot Richard

13

This will be available in PostgreSQL 9.0:

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.0/static/release-9-0.html, Section E.1.3.6.1. Aggregates

In the meantime, you could do something like this which may solve the problem (albeit clunky):

SELECT array_agg(animal_name)
FROM (
    SELECT "name" AS animal_name
    FROM animals
    ORDER BY "name"
) AS sorted_animals;
  • This will do! And very happy to know that it will be implemented in 9.0. – Richard Aug 11 '10 at 20:16
46

For modern PostgreSQL (since version 9.0), you can use an ORDER BY clause in an aggregate expression:

SELECT
    array_to_string(array_agg(name ORDER BY name), ', ')
FROM
    animals;

Also, for your specific purpose, you can use string_agg to simplify your query:

SELECT
    string_agg(name, ', ' ORDER BY name)
FROM
    animals;
  • Thanks for the hint! – Richard Sep 23 '11 at 6:29
4

Although Matthew Wood's answer is better for your case, here is a way to sort arrays in PostgreSQL 8.4 and up:

SELECT array(
    SELECT unnest(array[3,2,1]) AS x ORDER BY x
);

Knowing the array and unnest functions can be handy, since it also lets you do things like "map" over an array:

SELECT array(
    SELECT x*x FROM (SELECT unnest(array[1,2,3]) AS x) as subquery
);

Again, this can be yours for the price of PostgreSQL 8.4 .

  • A great workaround I will keep in mind. Thank you very much. – Richard Aug 11 '10 at 20:41
0

Have you tried to use generate_series() on the array, and then do a SELECT...ORDER BY on that result (or just nest it inside of the SELECT) before you convert it to a string?

  • I just nested it. The subselect did the magic I needed. – Richard Aug 11 '10 at 20:42
0

Still, for version 8.4, using the solution suggested by Matthew Wood, if you need to do a grouping in the outer query, the inner query should be sorted, too, for the sorting to be consistent.

SELECT family, array_agg(animal_name)
FROM (
    SELECT family, "name" AS animal_name
    FROM animals
    ORDER BY family, "name"
) AS sorted_animals
group by family;
0

To update on this question, Snowflake has implemented array sorting:

SELECT
    array_sort(array_agg("name")
FROM
    animals;

Can also use array_sort_by to sort an object

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.