13

How do I change all dots . to underscores (in the dict's keys), given an arbitrarily nested dictionary?

What I tried is write two loops, but then I would be limited to 2-level-nested dictionaries.

This ...

{
    "brown.muffins": 5,
    "green.pear": 4,
    "delicious.apples": {
        "green.apples": 2
    {
}

... should become:

{
    "brown_muffins": 5,
    "green_pear": 4,
    "delicious_apples": {
        "green_apples": 2
    {
}

Is there an elegant way?

  • 2
    Define method to loop over dictionary keys/values, if key has dot, replace, if value is another dict, enter recursion (call the same method but now with this dict) – Tim Castelijns Jan 5 '16 at 15:24
  • 1
    What have you tried? Don't get that 'arbitrarely nested' with 'got two loops'. – tglaria Jan 5 '16 at 15:25
  • The beauty of recursion, baby – Bob Dylan Jan 5 '16 at 15:26
  • 1
    @PeterWood - That's a possibility with any recursion. If the structure isn't nested very deeply, it'll probably be fine. – TigerhawkT3 Jan 5 '16 at 15:36
  • 2
    @PeterWood stack overflow, baby :P – Bob Dylan Jan 5 '16 at 15:37
20

You can write a recursive function, like this

from collections.abc import Mapping
def rec_key_replace(obj):
    if isinstance(obj, Mapping):
        return {key.replace('.', '_'): rec_key_replace(val) for key, val in obj.items()}
    return obj

and when you invoke this with the dictionary you have shown in the question, you will get a new dictionary, with the dots in keys replaced with _s

{'delicious_apples': {'green_apples': 2}, 'green_pear': 4, 'brown_muffins': 5}

Explanation

Here, we just check if the current object is an instance of dict and if it is, then we iterate the dictionary, replace the key and call the function recursively. If it is actually not a dictionary, then return it as it is.

  • why not dict instead of Mapping ? – Iron Fist Jan 6 '16 at 6:29
  • 1
    @IronFist When you check if it is an instance of dict, you are restricting it to just dict and its subclasses. Instead, you relax the condition a little and allow any class which has few methods which would make it look like a dictionary. You might want to look at mapping definition. – thefourtheye Jan 6 '16 at 6:45
  • forgive lack of knowledge here..:P .. One more thing, it's just as suggestion, don't you think it's safe to wrap it with tr-except block to be safe from reaching maximum iteration if that matters, and raise an exception when so or any control measure against it...? – Iron Fist Jan 6 '16 at 7:06
  • @IronFist This is not production ready code :D I don't expect anyone to use it as it is. They can increase the recursion limit if they like :-) – thefourtheye Jan 6 '16 at 7:07
7

Assuming . is only present in keys and all the dictionary's contents are primitive literals, the really cheap way would be to use str() or repr(), do the replacement, then ast.literal_eval() to get it back:

d ={
    "brown.muffins": 5,
    "green.pear": 4,
    "delicious_apples": {
        "green.apples": 2
    } # correct brace
}

Result:

>>> import ast
>>> ast.literal_eval(repr(d).replace('.','_'))
{'delicious_apples': {'green_apples': 2}, 'green_pear': 4, 'brown_muffins': 5}

If the dictionary has . outside of keys, we can replace more carefully by using a regular expression to look for strings like 'ke.y': and replace only those bits:

>>> import re
>>> ast.literal_eval(re.sub(r"'(.*?)':", lambda x: x.group(0).replace('.','_'), repr(d)))
{'delicious_apples': {'green_apples': 2}, 'green_pear': 4, 'brown_muffins': 5}

If your dictionary is very complex, with '.' in values and dictionary-like strings and so on, use a real recursive approach. Like I said at the start, though, this is the cheap way.

  • 9
    That would also replace in the values, though – cricket_007 Jan 5 '16 at 15:26
  • 1
    @cricket_007 I think he's talking about integral amounts of fruits and confections. – erip Jan 5 '16 at 15:27
  • 1
    @erip - still not what OP asked – cricket_007 Jan 5 '16 at 15:27
  • 1
    Assuming you don't have {'my.key': __my_method} :P – Bob Dylan Jan 5 '16 at 15:28
  • 3
    @erip ideally, it should also be useful for future visitors, not just OPs specific case. Very creative nonetheless – Tim Castelijns Jan 5 '16 at 15:28

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