1

I have a database table that keeps track of when an item goes out of stock and when it comes back in stock. An additional column keeps track of the timestamp for when any given record is updated. The OOStock/InStock columns are both datetime and the update column is just a timestamp that requires no input on my part.

I was checking the records today to make sure my script was running properly and I noticed that all of the records have mismatched time values, and in some cases, mismatched dates. For example, the newest record shows that some item went out of stock at 1:45:06 on 2016/1/5, but the update column for that record shows a timestamp of 18:45:06 on 2016/1/4. There's always a difference of seven hours between the OOStock value and LastUpdate value for any given record (it only started running yesterday, so there's been no opportunity to test this with the InStock column).

The PHP code I'm using to get the current time and date for a new insertion is as follows:

$currentDate = date("Y-m-d H:i:s");
$start = "INSERT INTO out_of_stock (ID, OOStockTS, InStockTS, Status) VALUES (";
$end = sprintf("'%s', '%s', null, '%s')", $item->ID, $currentDate, "OPEN");
$start .= $end;
$db_controller->insert($start);

Why is this happening? Is it just a difference in time zones or timestamp implementation? Aside from this, my script is working as intended. I just wanted to know why these dates and times don't match when it seems like they should.

  • post the trigger which updates the timestamp as updates are made. – Noob Jan 5 '16 at 15:47
  • I'm using phpMyAdmin. There's a "default" option for my LastUpdate column that I set to CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. – user3521737 Jan 5 '16 at 15:51
3

Check to see if your database is using a different timezone from your version of PHP. Your PHP .ini file will have the setting for what timezone you are set to. If you run this code on your DB:

SELECT @@system_time_zone;

You should see if they either align, or mismatch.

  • This was it. The timezones are different. PHP is using Europe/Berlin for whatever reason and the database is using central time. – user3521737 Jan 5 '16 at 15:54
  • If my solution worked, can you please mark it as the accepted answer :) – Haymaker Jan 5 '16 at 15:58
  • It did but I'm not sure whether to mark yours or the other guy's as the best answer. To be precise, your answer directly addressed the question while the other one did essentially the same as your solution and suggested a fix. – user3521737 Jan 5 '16 at 16:03
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It seems to be a timezone issue. Your PHP script is obviously in another TZ than the database. Which one is proper is not clear by the question so far. Just one recommendation: It's not necessary to retrieve the current time client side, let this be done by the DB itself:

$currentDate = "NOW()";  // just use the MySql function for current TS
$start = "INSERT INTO out_of_stock (ID, OOStockTS, InStockTS, Status) VALUES (";
$end = sprintf("'%s', %s, null, '%s')", $item->ID, $currentDate, "OPEN");
$start .= $end;
$db_controller->insert($start);

This should at least give consistent TS within the DB.

  • In regards to this solution. you would no longer need $currentDate = "NOW()" since 'now' is a reserved word in MySQL you would just use it as follows: $end = sprintf("'%s', %s, null, '%s')", $item->ID, NOW(), "OPEN"); – Haymaker Jan 5 '16 at 16:03
  • I think what you meant to type was: $end = sprintf("'%s', NOW(), null, '%s')", $item->ID, "OPEN"); And even that can be simplified by getting rid of the second %s by replacing it with 'OPEN.' – user3521737 Jan 7 '16 at 17:33

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