20

I have the following Ansible Playbook code:

- name: Users | Generate password for user (Debian/Ubuntu)
  shell: makepasswd --chars=20
  register: make_password
  when: ansible_distribution in ['Debian', 'Ubuntu']

- name: Users | Generate password for user (Fedora)
  shell: makepasswd -m 20 -M 20
  register: make_password
  when: ansible_distribution in ['Fedora', 'Amazon']

- name: Users | Generate password for user (CentOS)
  shell: mkpasswd -l 20
  register: make_password
  when: ansible_distribution in ['CentOS']

- name: debug
  debug: var=make_password

Which outputs:

TASK: [users | debug] 
ok: [127.0.0.1] => {
                     "var": {
                       "make_password": {
                         "changed": false,
                         "skipped": true
                       }
                     }
                   }

... Because every register block gets executed regardless of the when condition.

How would I fix this so make_password doesn't get overwritten when the when condition isn't met?

Or if this is the wrong approach for what you can see that I'm trying to accomplish, let me know of a better one.

20

Unfortunately, this is the expected behavior. From Ansible Variables

Note If a task fails or is skipped, the variable still is registered with a failure or skipped status, the only way to avoid registering a variable is using tags.

I do not know how to use tags to solve your issue.

EDIT: I found a way albeit a crude solution. Store the results so that it is not overwritten

  - set_fact: mypwd="{{make_password}}"
    when: make_password.changed

So your code will look like:

- name: Users | Generate password for user (Debian/Ubuntu)
  shell: makepasswd --chars=20
  register: make_password
  when: ansible_distribution in ['Debian', 'Ubuntu']

- set_fact: mypwd="{{make_password}}"
  when: make_password.changed

- name: Users | Generate password for user (Fedora)
  shell: makepasswd -m 20 -M 20
  register: make_password
  when: ansible_distribution in ['Fedora', 'Amazon']

- set_fact: mypwd="{{make_password}}"
  when: make_password.changed

- name: Users | Generate password for user (CentOS)
  shell: mkpasswd -l 20
  register: make_password
  when: ansible_distribution in ['CentOS']

- set_fact: mypwd="{{make_password}}"
  when: make_password.changed

- name: debug
  debug: var=mypwd
1
  • This really helped, thanks. Sometimes I wonder if ansible saves me time or not though. It seems like this would be a pretty common use case for "when" and "register"...
    – Enrico
    Mar 11 at 10:50
3

Typically for tasks that run differently on different distros I tend to include a distro specific playbook that is then conditionally included into main.yml.

So an example might look something like this:

main.yml:

- include: tasks/Debian.yml
  when: ansible_distribution in ['Debian', 'Ubuntu']

- include: tasks/Fedora.yml
  when: ansible_distribution in ['Fedora', 'Amazon']

- include: tasks/Centos.yml
  when: ansible_distribution in ['CentOS']

- name: debug
  debug: var=make_password

Debian.yml

- name: Users | Generate password for user (Debian/Ubuntu)
  shell: makepasswd --chars=20
  register: make_password

And obviously repeat for the other 2 distros.

This way you keep main.yml to be only running all the generic tasks for the role that can be run on any distro but then anything that needs to be different can be in a distro specific playbook. Because the include is conditional it won't even load the task if the condition isn't met so the variable should not be registered.

1
  • Not sure you are correct in your thinking here. The ansible docs (playbooks_conditionals) state (emphasis mine): > Note that if you have several tasks that all share the same conditional statement, you can affix the conditional to a task include statement as below. All the tasks get evaluated, but the conditional is applied to each and every task
    – Danimal
    Aug 30 '16 at 13:08
3

how about define a dict in var file?

cat vars.yml

make_password: {
                'Debian':'makepasswd --chars=20',
                'Ubuntu':'makepasswd --chars=20',
                'Fedora':'makepasswd -m 20 -M 20',
                'Amazon':'makepasswd -m 20 -M 20',
                'CentOS':'mkpasswd -l 20'
                }

cat test.yml

---
- hosts: "{{ host }}"
  remote_user: root
  vars_files:
    - vars.yml 
 tasks:
    - name: get mkpasswd
      debug: var="{{ make_password[ansible_distribution] }}"

run result:

TASK: [get mkpasswd]
ok: [10.10.10.1] => {
    "mkpasswd -l 20": "mkpasswd -l 20"
}
-3

Maybe it makes sense to put all the variants into a shell script and then just run that script instead of multiple Ansible tasks.

The script can detect the OS or simply react on a passed parameter.

#!/bin/bash

case "$1" in
"Debian" | "Ubuntu")
    makepasswd --chars=20
    ;;
"Fedora" | "Amazon")
    makepasswd -m 20 -M 20
    ;;
"CentOS")
    mkpasswd -l 20
    ;;
*)
    echo "Unexpected distribution" 1>&2
    exit 1
    ;;
esac

Throw this in the scripts folder of your role as make_password.sh and then call it as:

- name: Users | Generate password for user
  script: make_password.sh {{ ansible_distribution }}
  register: make_password

Another idea: You seem to actually generate a password remotely, register the output and then use it later in other tasks. If you can guarantee the Ansible master host always is of the same type and not every team member uses a different distribution you could simply run the task locally.

Let's say you use Ubuntu:

- name: Users | Generate password for user
  shell: makepasswd --chars=20
  delegate_to: localhost
  register: make_password

The tasks is executed locally on the host you ran Ansible via delegate_to.

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