When iterating over an object's properties, is it safe to delete them while in a for-in loop?

For example:

for (var key in obj) {
    if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) continue;

    if (shouldDelete(obj[key])) {
        delete obj[key];
    }
}

In many other languages iterating over an array or dictionary and deleting inside that is unsafe. Is it okay in JS?

(I am using Mozilla's Spidermonkey runtime.)

  • I have started a bounty on this question because I think the current answer is inadequate and does not answer the question as presented. Please also include a relevant source (hopefully from the specification) and any notable browser "quirks", if applicable. – user2864740 Oct 23 '13 at 22:49
up vote 95 down vote accepted
+100

The ECMAScript 5.1 standard section 12.6.4 (on for-in loops) says:

Properties of the object being enumerated may be deleted during enumeration. If a property that has not yet been visited during enumeration is deleted, then it will not be visited. If new properties are added to the object being enumerated during enumeration, the newly added properties are not guaranteed to be visited in the active enumeration. A property name must not be visited more than once in any enumeration.

So I think it's clear that the OP's code is legal and will work as expected. Browser quirks affect iteration order and delete statements in general, but not whether the OPs code will work. It's generally best only to delete the current property in the iteration - deleting other properties in the object will unpredictably cause them to be included (if already visited) or not included in the iteration, although that may or may not be a concern depending on the situation.

See also:

None of these really affects the OP's code though.

  • I just noticed I included the same standards quote as the other answer, apologies. – TomW Oct 24 '13 at 11:32

From the Javascript/ECMAScript specification (specifically 12.6.4 The for-in Statement):

Properties of the object being enumerated may be deleted during enumeration. If a property that has not yet been visited during enumeration is deleted, then it will not be visited. If new properties are added to the object being enumerated during enumeration, the newly added properties are not guaranteed to be visited in the active enumeration. A property name must not be visited more than once in any enumeration.

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