4

it's a simple code, but returns different results in Andriod and Iphone.

var str = [1,2,3,4,5].sort(function () {
    return -1;
})
document.write(str);

In MDN(https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/sort) it says

  • If compareFunction(a, b) is less than 0, sort a to a lower index than b, i.e. a comes first.
  • If compareFunction(a, b) returns 0, leave a and b unchanged with respect to each other, but sorted with respect to all different elements. Note: the ECMAscript standard does not guarantee this behaviour, and thus not all browsers (e.g. Mozilla versions dating back to at least 2003) respect this.
  • If compareFunction(a, b) is greater than 0, sort b to a lower index than a. compareFunction(a, b) must always return the same value when given a specific pair of elements a and b as its two arguments. If inconsistent results are returned then the sort order is undefined.

So the result should be 1,2,3,4,5. But is Iphone it shows 5,4,3,2,1

Here is a link for you to try this code. http://www.madcoder.cn/demos/ios-test.html

And after I did more and more test. I found Iphone is doing a different sorting. Here is a link shows how sort works: http://www.madcoder.cn/demos/ios-test2.html

  • 1
    If compareFunction(a, b) is less than 0, sort a to a lower index than b, i.e. a comes first. So it should return 1,2,3,4,5. but in Iphone it returns 5,4,3,2,1 – Gcaufy Jan 7 '16 at 3:10
  • 5
    Your sort function is invalid. It returns -1 for all parameter pairs, regardless of their order. This means that pairs like [1,2] and [2,1] both result in -1. This means that your sorting function is not actually sorting the array at all. The fact that the output is sorted is accidental. See jsfiddle.net/rq7bnsxd – Dancrumb Jan 7 '16 at 3:38
  • 1
    @Tushar I know your code works, but I just want to know why – Gcaufy Jan 7 '16 at 3:38
  • 2
    What @Dancrumb said; I voted to re-open, but in retrospect, probably shouldn't have. If everything returns the same value then you're basically saying "there is no order to this; do whatever your sort algorithm does." You might be able to use this to figure out what algo is used, though. – Dave Newton Jan 7 '16 at 3:43
  • 3
    @Gcaufy It looks sorted, because that's what its sort algorithm happens to end up with when there's no natural order. It's not "sorted", it's reversed, e.g., try [1, 3, 2, 4, 6, 5, 8, 7] – Dave Newton Jan 7 '16 at 3:47
3
0

The javascript engines use different algorithms for their sort function. Since the compare function doesn't compare values, you get the result of the inner workings of the different algorithms instead of having a sorted result.

Looking at the source code of V8 engine (Chrome) and JavaScriptCore (which seems to be used by Safari, or at least the sort function gives the same result, so I guess it uses the same kind of algorithm), you can view the functions that are being used.

Not that it might not be exactly the functions used, what's important is that the algorithms are different. They give the same result if you actually compare values, but if not, the result is dependent on the way they operate, not on the function itself. At least not completely.

Here's V8 engine sorting function. You'll see that for arrays bigger than 10 elements, the algorithm isn't the same, so the result for arrays smaller than 10 elements is different than for those bigger than 10 elements.

You can find following algorithms here: https://code.google.com/p/chromium/codesearch#chromium/src/v8/src/js/array.js&q=array&sq=package:chromium&dr=C

comparefn = function(a, b) {
  return -1
}
var InsertionSort = function InsertionSort(a, from, to) {
  for (var i = from + 1; i < to; i++) {
    var element = a[i];
    for (var j = i - 1; j >= from; j--) {
      var tmp = a[j];
      var order = comparefn(tmp, element);
      if (order > 0) {
        a[j + 1] = tmp;
      } else {
        break;
      }
    }
    a[j + 1] = element;
  }

  console.log(a);
}
var GetThirdIndex = function(a, from, to) {
  var t_array = new InternalArray();
  // Use both 'from' and 'to' to determine the pivot candidates.
  var increment = 200 + ((to - from) & 15);
  var j = 0;
  from += 1;
  to -= 1;
  for (var i = from; i < to; i += increment) {
    t_array[j] = [i, a[i]];
    j++;
  }
  t_array.sort(function(a, b) {
    return comparefn(a[1], b[1]);
  });
  var third_index = t_array[t_array.length >> 1][0];
  return third_index;
}


var QuickSort = function QuickSort(a, from, to) {

  var third_index = 0;
  while (true) {
    // Insertion sort is faster for short arrays.
    if (to - from <= 10) {
      InsertionSort(a, from, to);
      return;
    }
    if (to - from > 1000) {
      third_index = GetThirdIndex(a, from, to);
    } else {
      third_index = from + ((to - from) >> 1);
    }

    // Find a pivot as the median of first, last and middle element.
    var v0 = a[from];
    var v1 = a[to - 1];
    var v2 = a[third_index];
    var c01 = comparefn(v0, v1);
    if (c01 > 0) {
      // v1 < v0, so swap them.
      var tmp = v0;
      v0 = v1;
      v1 = tmp;
    } // v0 <= v1.
    var c02 = comparefn(v0, v2);
    if (c02 >= 0) {
      // v2 <= v0 <= v1.
      var tmp = v0;
      v0 = v2;
      v2 = v1;
      v1 = tmp;
    } else {
      // v0 <= v1 && v0 < v2
      var c12 = comparefn(v1, v2);
      if (c12 > 0) {
        // v0 <= v2 < v1
        var tmp = v1;
        v1 = v2;
        v2 = tmp;
      }
    }
    // v0 <= v1 <= v2
    a[from] = v0;
    a[to - 1] = v2;
    var pivot = v1;
    var low_end = from + 1; // Upper bound of elements lower than pivot.
    var high_start = to - 1; // Lower bound of elements greater than pivot.
    a[third_index] = a[low_end];
    a[low_end] = pivot;

    // From low_end to i are elements equal to pivot.
    // From i to high_start are elements that haven't been compared yet.
    partition: for (var i = low_end + 1; i < high_start; i++) {
      var element = a[i];
      var order = comparefn(element, pivot);
      if (order < 0) {
        a[i] = a[low_end];
        a[low_end] = element;
        low_end++;
      } else if (order > 0) {
        do {
          high_start--;
          if (high_start == i) break partition;
          var top_elem = a[high_start];
          order = comparefn(top_elem, pivot);
        } while (order > 0);
        a[i] = a[high_start];
        a[high_start] = element;
        if (order < 0) {
          element = a[i];
          a[i] = a[low_end];
          a[low_end] = element;
          low_end++;
        }
      }
    }
    if (to - high_start < low_end - from) {
      QuickSort(a, high_start, to);
      to = low_end;
    } else {
      QuickSort(a, from, low_end);
      from = high_start;
    }
  }


};



InsertionSort([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 0, 5);

//QuickSort is recursive and calls Insertion sort, so you'll have multiple logs for this one
QuickSort([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13], 0, 13);

//You'll see that for arrays bigger than 10, QuickSort is called.
var srt = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13].sort(function() {
  return -1
})

console.log(srt)

And JavaScriptCore uses merge sort. You can find this algorithm here: http://trac.webkit.org/browser/trunk/Source/JavaScriptCore/builtins/ArrayPrototype.js

function min(a, b) {
  return a < b ? a : b;
}

function merge(dst, src, srcIndex, srcEnd, width, comparator) {
  var left = srcIndex;
  var leftEnd = min(left + width, srcEnd);
  var right = leftEnd;
  var rightEnd = min(right + width, srcEnd);

  for (var dstIndex = left; dstIndex < rightEnd; ++dstIndex) {
    if (right < rightEnd) {
      if (left >= leftEnd || comparator(src[right], src[left]) < 0) {
        dst[dstIndex] = src[right++];
        continue;
      }
    }

    dst[dstIndex] = src[left++];
  }
}

function mergeSort(array, valueCount, comparator) {
  var buffer = [];
  buffer.length = valueCount;

  var dst = buffer;
  var src = array;
  for (var width = 1; width < valueCount; width *= 2) {
    for (var srcIndex = 0; srcIndex < valueCount; srcIndex += 2 * width)
      merge(dst, src, srcIndex, valueCount, width, comparator);

    var tmp = src;
    src = dst;
    dst = tmp;
  }

  if (src != array) {
    for (var i = 0; i < valueCount; i++)
      array[i] = src[i];
  }

  return array;
}


console.log(mergeSort([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 5, function() {
  return -1;
}))

Again these may not be exactly the functions used in each browser, but it shows you how different algorithms will behave if you don't actually compare values.

| improve this answer | |
  • First I test the algorithm in webkit code. it doesn't work like Iphone did. but anyway. I get the idea. – Gcaufy Jan 7 '16 at 6:32
  • Does that mean the way how webkit implement the method does not follow the standard? because the document says "If compareFunction(a, b) is less than 0, sort a to a lower index than b, i.e. a comes first." – Gcaufy Jan 7 '16 at 6:34
  • 1
    But you don't know what a and b will be. That's the role of the algorithm to generate these and determine in which order they're evaluated. If for example 'a' is after 'b' in the array and has a higher value than 'b'. Then a compare function 'a - b' would return a positive, which means no sorting is required. But if you push a negative, you force a sorting that shouldn't be done. The standard doesn't state that the 'a' and 'b' of the compareFunction will be passed in order of index. That's why returning a fixed value will give an order that depends on the algorithm. – Julien Grégoire Jan 7 '16 at 7:59

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