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My xmas holiday project this year was to build a little Android app, which should be able to detect arbitrary Euro coins in a picture, recognize their value and sum the values up.

My assumptions/requirements for the picture for a good recognition are

  • uniform background
  • picture should be roughly the size of a DinA4 paper
  • coins may not overlap, but may touch each other
  • number-side of the coins must be up/visible

My initial thought was, that for the coin value-recognition later it would be best to first detect the actual coins/their regions in the picture. Any recognition then would run on only these regions of the picture, where actual coins are found.

So the first step was to find circles. This i have accomplished using this OpenCV 3 pipeline, as suggested in several books and SO postings:

  1. convert to gray
  2. CannyEdge detection
  3. Gauss blurring
  4. HoughCircle detection
  5. filtering out inner/redundant circles

The detection works rather successfully IMHO, here a picture of the result: Coins detected with HoughCircles with blue border

Up to the recognition now for every found coin!

I searched for solutions to this problem and came up with

  • template matching
  • feature detection
  • machine learning

The template matching seems very inappropriate for this problem, as the coins can be arbitrary rotated with respect to a template coin (and the template matching algorithm is not rotation-invariant! so i would have to rotate the coins!). Also pixels of the template coin will never exactly match those of the region of the formerly detected coin. So any algorithm computing the similarity will produce only poor results, i think.

Then i looked into feature detection. This seemed more appropriate to me. I detected the features of a template-coin and the candidate-coin picture and drew the matches (combination of ORB and BRUTEFORCE_HAMMING). Unfortunately the features of the template-coin were also detected in the wrong candidate coins. See the following picture, where the template or "feature" coin is on the left, a 20 Cents coin. To the right there are the candidate coin, where the left-most coin is a 20 Cents coin. I actually expected this coin to have the most matches, unfortunately not. So again, this seems not to be a viable way to recognize the value of coins. Feature-matches drawn between a template coin and candidate coins

So machine learning is the third possible solution. From university i still now about neural networks, how they work, etc. Unfortunately my practical knowledge is rather poor AND i don't know Support Vector Machines (SVM) at all, which is the machine learning supported by OpenCV.

So my question is actually not source-code related, but more how to setup the learning process.

  1. Should i learn on the plain coin-images or should i first extract features and learn on the features? (i think: features)
  2. How much positives and negatives per coin should be given?
  3. Would i have to learn also on rotated coins or would this rotation be handled "automagically" by the SVM? So would the SVM recognize rotated coins, even if i only trained it on non-rotated coins?
  4. One of my picture-requirements above ("DinA4") limits the size of the coin to a certain size, e.g. 1/12 of the picture-height. Should i learn on coins of roughly the same size or different sizes? I think, that different sizes would result in different features, which would not help the learning process, what do you think?

Of course, if you have a different possible solution, this is also welcome! Any help is appreciated! :-)

Bye & Thanks!

1 Answer 1

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Answering your questions:

1- Should i learn on the plain coin-images or should i first extract features and learn on the features? (i think: features)

For many object classification tasks it's better to extract the features first and then train a classifier using a learning algorithm. (e.g the features can be HOG and the learning algorithm can be something like SVM or Adaboost). It's mainly due to the fact that the features have more meaningful information compared to the pixel values. (They can describe edges,shapes, texture, etc.) However, the algorithms like deep learning will extract the useful features as a part of learning procedure.

2 - How much positives and negatives per coin should be given?

You need to answer this question depending on the variation in the classes you want to recognize and the learning algorithm you use. For SVM , if you use HOG features and want to recognize specific numbers on coins you won't need much.

3- Would i have to learn also on rotated coins or would this rotation be handled "automagically" by the SVM? So would the SVM recognize rotated coins, even if i only trained it on non-rotated coins?

Again it depends on your final decision about the features(not SVM which is the learning algorithm) you're going to choose. HOG features are not rotation invariant but there are features like SIFT or SURF which are.

4-One of my picture-requirements above ("DinA4") limits the size of the coin to a certain size, e.g. 1/12 of the picture-height. Should i learn on coins of roughly the same size or different sizes? I think, that different sizes would result in different features, which would not help the learning process, what do you think?

Again, choose your algorithm , some of them ask you for a fixed/similar width/height ratio. You can find out about the specific requirements in related papers.

If you decide to use SVM take a look at this and also if you feel ok with Neural Network, using Tensorflow is a good idea.

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  • thank you very much for answering! i already thought so, that the answers would be "it depends" :-) i will investigate a little further and post my findings.
    – Ximon
    Jan 9, 2016 at 9:54

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