Has anyone found a useful solution to the DesignMode problem when developing controls?

The issue is that if you nest controls then DesignMode only works for the first level. The second and lower levels DesignMode will always return FALSE.

The standard hack has been to look at the name of the process that is running and if it is "DevEnv.EXE" then it must be studio thus DesignMode is really TRUE.

The problem with that is looking for the ProcessName works its way around through the registry and other strange parts with the end result that the user might not have the required rights to see the process name. In addition this strange route is very slow. So we have had to pile additional hacks to use a singleton and if an error is thrown when asking for the process name then assume that DesignMode is FALSE.

A nice clean way to determine DesignMode is in order. Acually getting Microsoft to fix it internally to the framework would be even better!

  • 8
    +1 for "getting Microsoft to fix it internally to the framework would be even better" - ten minutes of someone's time would save tens-of-thousands of people hours a piece. If there is one program that relies on a bug and 100,000 which are inconvenienced by it, it does not make sense to keep the bug to avoid inconveniencing the one program! – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 22 '10 at 18:32
  • Hi, this was posted in 2008. Is this now fixed? – Jake Dec 4 '12 at 8:48
  • In VS 2012 this remains the same now – Boogier Feb 5 '14 at 11:40
  • Note that if using a custom designer for a UserControl (eg. I've tested with a class deriving from ControlDesigner), then calling EnableDesignMode(subControl) seems to make the DesignMode property of the subcontrol work. This isn't an effective solution to the problem however as we don't always author the container which houses our control. – Protongun Aug 21 '14 at 21:28

11 Answers 11

up vote 74 down vote accepted

Revisiting this question, I have now 'discovered' 5 different ways of doing this, which are as follows:

System.ComponentModel.DesignMode property

System.ComponentModel.LicenseManager.UsageMode property

private string ServiceString()
{
    if (GetService(typeof(System.ComponentModel.Design.IDesignerHost)) != null) 
        return "Present";
    else
        return "Not present";
}

public bool IsDesignerHosted
{
    get
    {
        Control ctrl = this;

        while(ctrl != null)
        {
            if((ctrl.Site != null) && ctrl.Site.DesignMode)
                return true;
            ctrl = ctrl.Parent;
        }
        return false;
    }
}
public static bool IsInDesignMode()
{
    return System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()
         .Location.Contains("VisualStudio"))
}

To try and get a hang on the three solutions proposed, I created a little test solution - with three projects:

  • TestApp (winforms application),
  • SubControl (dll)
  • SubSubControl (dll)

I then embedded the SubSubControl in the SubControl, then one of each in the TestApp.Form.

This screenshot shows the result when running. Screenshot of running

This screenshot shows the result with the form open in Visual Studio:

Screenshot of not running

Conclusion: It would appear that without reflection the only one that is reliable within the constructor is LicenseUsage, and the only one which is reliable outside the constructor is 'IsDesignedHosted' (by BlueRaja below)

PS: See ToolmakerSteve's comment below (which I haven't tested): "Note that IsDesignerHosted answer has been updated to include LicenseUsage..., so now the test can simply be if (IsDesignerHosted). An alternative approach is test LicenseManager in constructor and cache the result."

  • @Benjol: What about IsDesignerHosted (below)? (Also, I think you have design-time and runtime swapped, check what it says during runtime) – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 22 '10 at 18:21
  • @BlueRaja, I must still have that project lying around somewhere on disk, maybe I should post it somewhere... – Benjol Apr 22 '10 at 18:59
  • 1
    +1 for the clarification by an empirical experiment. @Benjol, If you get a chance to revisit this, you might add a case for the values in the form itself since child controls may be treated differently than the class actually being edited in the designer. (Note that the constructor of the class being edited does not get executed in the designer.) – Rob Parker Feb 18 '11 at 19:46
  • 2
    So, without reflection if(LicenseUseage == LicenseUsageMode.Designtime || IsDesignerHosted) would be the 100% correct approach? – Scott Chamberlain Aug 2 '13 at 13:51
  • 1
    Note that IsDesignerHosted answer has been updated to include LicenseUsage..., so now the test can simply be if (IsDesignerHosted). An alternative approach is test LicenseManager in constructor and cache the result. – ToolmakerSteve May 20 '17 at 10:44

Why don't you check LicenseManager.UsageMode. This property can have the values LicenseUsageMode.Runtime or LicenseUsageMode.Designtime.

Is you want code to only run in runtime, use the following code:

if (LicenseManager.UsageMode == LicenseUsageMode.Runtime)
{
  bla bla bla...
}
  • 8
    +1 I've used this too. What trips people up is that DesignMode won't work in a constructor. – Nicholas Piasecki Dec 6 '08 at 21:46
  • 1
    @Nicholas: It also does not work in child controls. It is simply broken. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Dec 20 '10 at 19:02
  • +1 - it also works on base controls being constructed during design of a derived control. – mcw0933 Apr 21 '11 at 12:36

From this page:

([Edit 2013] Edited to work in constructors, using the method provided by @hopla)

/// <summary>
/// The DesignMode property does not correctly tell you if
/// you are in design mode.  IsDesignerHosted is a corrected
/// version of that property.
/// (see https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/553305
/// and http://stackoverflow.com/a/2693338/238419 )
/// </summary>
public bool IsDesignerHosted
{
    get
    {
        if (LicenseManager.UsageMode == LicenseUsageMode.Designtime)
            return true;

        Control ctrl = this;
        while (ctrl != null)
        {
            if ((ctrl.Site != null) && ctrl.Site.DesignMode)
                return true;
            ctrl = ctrl.Parent;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

I've submitted a bug-report with Microsoft; I doubt it will go anywhere, but vote it up anyways, as this is obviously a bug (whether or not it's "by design").

This is the method I use inside forms:

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a value indicating whether this instance is in design mode.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>
    ///     <c>true</c> if this instance is in design mode; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
    /// </value>
    protected bool IsDesignMode
    {
        get { return DesignMode || LicenseManager.UsageMode == LicenseUsageMode.Designtime; }
    }

This way, the result will be correct, even if either of DesignMode or LicenseManager properties fail.

  • 1
    Yes, this will work in forms as you say. But I would like to point out that is does not work outside the constructor in grandchild user controls. – Anlo Sep 17 '14 at 13:10

We use this code with success:

public static bool IsRealDesignerMode(this Control c)
{
  if (System.ComponentModel.LicenseManager.UsageMode == System.ComponentModel.LicenseUsageMode.Designtime)
    return true;
  else
  {
    Control ctrl = c;

    while (ctrl != null)
    {
      if (ctrl.Site != null && ctrl.Site.DesignMode)
        return true;
      ctrl = ctrl.Parent;
    }

    return System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName == "devenv";
  }
}

My suggestion is an optimization of @blueraja-danny-pflughoeft reply. This solution doesn't calculate result every time but only at the first time (an object cannot change UsageMode from design to runtime)

private bool? m_IsDesignerHosted = null; //contains information about design mode state
/// <summary>
/// The DesignMode property does not correctly tell you if
/// you are in design mode.  IsDesignerHosted is a corrected
/// version of that property.
/// (see https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/553305
/// and https://stackoverflow.com/a/2693338/238419 )
/// </summary>
[Browsable(false)]
public bool IsDesignerHosted
{
    get
    {
        if (m_IsDesignerHosted.HasValue)
            return m_IsDesignerHosted.Value;
        else
        {
            if (LicenseManager.UsageMode == LicenseUsageMode.Designtime)
            {
                m_IsDesignerHosted = true;
                return true;
            }
            Control ctrl = this;
            while (ctrl != null)
            {
                if ((ctrl.Site != null) && ctrl.Site.DesignMode)
                {
                    m_IsDesignerHosted = true;
                    return true;
                }
                ctrl = ctrl.Parent;
            }
            m_IsDesignerHosted = false;
            return false;
        }
    }
}
  • If you are going to cache a value, there is no reason to go to this complexity. Instead, use Jonathan's answer, which uses the simple LicenseManager test in the constructor, caching the result. – ToolmakerSteve May 20 '17 at 9:47

I use the LicenseManager method, but cache the value from the constructor for use throughout the lifetime of the instance.

public MyUserControl()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    m_IsInDesignMode = (LicenseManager.UsageMode == LicenseUsageMode.Designtime);
}

private bool m_IsInDesignMode = true;
public bool IsInDesignMode { get { return m_IsInDesignMode; } }

VB version:

Sub New()
    InitializeComponent()

    m_IsInDesignMode = (LicenseManager.UsageMode = LicenseUsageMode.Designtime)
End Sub

Private ReadOnly m_IsInDesignMode As Boolean = True
Public ReadOnly Property IsInDesignMode As Boolean
    Get
        Return m_IsInDesignMode
    End Get
End Property
  • 1
    Jonathan, I've added a (tested) VB version to your answer. – ToolmakerSteve Jun 18 '17 at 23:10

I've never been caught by this myself, but couldn't you just walk back up the Parent chain from the control to see if DesignMode is set anywhere above you?

Since none of the methods are reliable (DesignMode, LicenseManager) or efficient (Process, recursive checks) I'm using a public static bool Runtime { get; private set } at program level and explicitly setting it inside the Main() method.

DesignMode is a private property (from what I can tell). The answer is to provide a public property that exposes the DesignMode prop. Then you can cascasde back up the chain of user controls until you run into a non-user control or a control that is in design mode. Something like this....

  public bool RealDesignMode()
  {
     if (Parent is MyBaseUserControl)
     {
        return (DesignMode ? true : (MyBaseUserControl) Parent.RealDesignMode;
     }

     return DesignMode;
  }

Where all your UserControls inherit from MyBaseUserControl. Alternatively you could implement an interface that exposes the "RealDeisgnMode".

Please note this code is not live code, just off the cuff musings. :)

I hadn't realised that you can't call Parent.DesignMode (and I have learned something about 'protected' in C# too...)

Here's a reflective version: (I suspect there might be a performance advantage to making designModeProperty a static field)

static bool IsDesignMode(Control control)
{
    PropertyInfo designModeProperty = typeof(Component).
      GetProperty("DesignMode", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);

    while (designModeProperty != null && control != null)
    {
        if((bool)designModeProperty.GetValue(control, null))
        {
            return true;
        }
        control = control.Parent;
    }
    return false;
}

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.