3

I am experimenting with Rust by implementing a small F# snippet of mine.

I am at the point where I want to destructure a string of characters. Here is the F#:

 let rec internalCheck acc = function
    | w :: tail when Char.IsWhiteSpace(w) -> 
        internalCheck acc tail
    | other
    | matches
    | here

..which can be called like this: internalCheck [] "String here" where the :: operator signifies the right hand side is the "rest of the list".

So I checked the Rust documentation and there are examples for destructuring vectors like this:

let v = vec![1,2,3];

match v {
    [] => ...
    [first, second, ..rest] => ...
}

..etc. However this is now behind the slice_patterns feature gate. I tried something similar to this:

match input.chars() {
    [w, ..] => ...
}

Which informed me that feature gates require non-stable releases to use.

So I downloaded multirust and installed the latest nightly I could find (2016-01-05) and when I finally got the slice_patterns feature working ... I ran into endless errors regarding syntax and "rest" (in the above example) not being allowed.

So, is there an equivalent way to destructure a string of characters, utilizing ::-like functionality ... in Rust? Basically I want to match 1 character with a guard and use "everything else" in the expression that follows.

It is perfectly acceptable if the answer is "No, there isn't". I certainly cannot find many examples of this sort online anywhere and the slice pattern matching doesn't seem to be high on the feature list.

(I will happily delete this question if there is something I missed in the Rust documentation)

6

You can use the pattern matching with a byte slice:

#![feature(slice_patterns)]

fn internal_check(acc: &[u8]) -> bool {
    match acc {
        &[b'-', ref tail..] => internal_check(tail),
        &[ch, ref tail..] if (ch as char).is_whitespace() => internal_check(tail),
        &[] => true,
        _ => false,
    }
}

fn main() {
    for s in ["foo", "bar", "   ", " - "].iter() {
        println!("text '{}', checks? {}", s, internal_check(s.as_bytes()));
    }
}

You can use it with a char slice (where char is a Unicode Scalar Value):

#![feature(slice_patterns)]

fn internal_check(acc: &[char]) -> bool {
    match acc {
        &['-', ref tail..] => internal_check(tail),
        &[ch, ref tail..] if ch.is_whitespace() => internal_check(tail),
        &[] => true,
        _ => false,
    }
}

fn main() {
    for s in ["foo", "bar", "   ", " - "].iter() {
        println!("text '{}', checks? {}",
                 s, internal_check(&s.chars().collect::<Vec<char>>()));
    }
}

But as of now it doesn't work with a &str (producing E0308). Which I think is for the best since &str is neither here nor there, it's a byte slice under the hood but Rust tries to guarantee that it's a valid UTF-8 and tries to remind you to work with &str in terms of unicode sequences and characters rather than bytes. So to efficiently match on the &str we have to explicitly use the as_bytes method, essentially telling Rust that "we know what we're doing".

That's my reading, anyway. If you want to dig deeper and into the source code of the Rust compiler you might start with issue 1844 and browse the commits and issues linked there.

Basically I want to match 1 character with a guard and use "everything else" in the expression that follows.

If you only want to match on a single character then using the chars iterator to get the characters and matching on the character itself might be better than converting the entire UTF-8 &str into a &[char] slice. For instance, with the chars iterator you don't have to allocate the memory for the characters array.

fn internal_check(acc: &str) -> bool {
    for ch in acc.chars() {
        match ch {
            '-' => (),
            ch if ch.is_whitespace() => (),
            _ => return false,
        }
    }
    return true;
}

fn main() {
    for s in ["foo", "bar", "   ", " - "].iter() {
        println!("text '{}', checks? {}", s, internal_check(s));
    }
}

You can also use the chars iterator to split the &str on the Unicode Scalar Value boundary:

fn internal_check(acc: &str) -> bool {
    let mut chars = acc.chars();
    match chars.next() {
        Some('-') => internal_check(chars.as_str()),
        Some(ch) if ch.is_whitespace() => internal_check(chars.as_str()),
        None => true,
        _ => false,
    }
}

fn main() {
    for s in ["foo", "bar", "   ", " - "].iter() {
        println!("text '{}', checks? {}", s, internal_check(s));
    }
}

But keep in mind that as of now Rust provides no guarantees of optimizing this tail-recursive function into a loop. (Tail call optimization would've been a welcome addition to the language but it wasn't implemented so far due to LLVM-related difficulties).

  • This is great! I really appreciate the time you took to put this together. There is literally 100 things in your samples (both the working and non working) that I can learn from. RE contributing.. I certainly would be up to the task in future.. once I am more comfortable with Rust. Thanks again! I really appreciate it! – Simon Whitehead Jan 8 '16 at 14:09
  • You're welcome! ) Also, I've locally checked all the samples in this answer and all of them should be working. If some of them aren't working for you then please give me a shout. – ArtemGr Jan 8 '16 at 15:04
  • 1
    due to LLVM-related difficulties — also because TCO makes stack traces not look the same. IIRC, the keyword become is reserved for opting in to future TCO. – Shepmaster Jan 8 '16 at 15:25
  • I realised I never accepted your answer @ArtemGr. Apologies for that. – Simon Whitehead Jan 19 '16 at 10:53
  • @SimonWhitehead NP! ) – ArtemGr Jan 19 '16 at 14:48
2

I don't believe so. Slice patterns aren't likely to be amenable to this, either, since the "and the rest" part of the pattern goes inside the array pattern, which would imply some way of putting said pattern inside a string, which implies an escaping mechanism that doesn't exist.

In addition, Rust doesn't have a proper "concatenation" operator, and the operators it does have can't participate in destructuring. So, I wouldn't hold your breath on this one.

  • 2
    Not to mention UTF-8 vs char vs codepoints vs graphemes... – Shepmaster Jan 8 '16 at 3:41
  • Fair enough. This was a feature I enjoyed in F# so I did hope it was possible in Rust. Nonetheless it won't stop me from investigating Rust ... so thanks :) – Simon Whitehead Jan 8 '16 at 3:42
1

Just going to post this here... it seems to do what I want. As a simple test, this will just print every character in a string but print Found a whitespace character when it finds a whitespace character. It does this recursively and destructuring a vector of bytes. I must give a shout out to @ArtemGr who gave me the inspiration to look at working with bytes to see if that fixed the compiler issues I was having with chars.

There are no doubt memory issues I am unaware of as yet here (copying/allocations, etc; especially around the String instances)... but I'll work on those as I dig deeper in to the inner workings of Rust. It's also probably much more verbose than it needs to be.. this is just where I got to after a little tinkering.

#![feature(slice_patterns)]

use std::iter::FromIterator;
use std::vec::Vec;

fn main() {
    process("Hello world!".to_string());
}

fn process(input: String) {
    match input.as_bytes() {
        &[c, ref _rest..] if (c as char).is_whitespace() => { println!("Found a whitespace character"); process(string_from_rest(_rest)) },
        &[c, ref _rest..] => { println!("{}", c as char); process(string_from_rest(_rest)) },
        _ => ()
    }
}

fn string_from_rest(rest: &[u8]) -> String {
    String::from_utf8(Vec::from_iter(rest.iter().cloned())).unwrap()
}

Output:

H
e
l
l
o
Found a whitespace character
w
o
r
l
d
!

Obviously, as its testing against individual bytes (and only considering possible UTF-8 characters when rebuilding the string), its not going to work with wide characters. My actual use case only requires characters in the ASCII space .. so this is sufficient for now.

I guess, to work on wider characters the Rust pattern matching would require the ability to type coerce (which I don't believe you can do currently?), since a Chars<'T> iterator seems to be inferred as &[_]. That could just be my immaturity with the Rust language though during my other attempts.

  • +1 for going there. Unless you'll only work with ASCII, I think you need to work on a &[char] slice and the only bottleneck then would be efficiently obtaining it from a &str. I would've used a stack-allocated array for that (crates.io/crates/stack) but it's a different story. – ArtemGr Jan 8 '16 at 9:52

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