I was trying to use RNN (in particular, LSTM) for sequence prediction. Here, I was faced with some issues. For example:

sent_1 = "I am flying to Dubain"
sent_2 = "I was traveling from US to Dubai"

What I am trying to do here is predicting the next word after the previous one, as a simple RNN based on this Benchmark for building a PTB LSTM model.

But the num_steps parameter (used for unrolling to the previous hidden states), should remain the same in each Tensorflow's epoch?. Basically, batching of sentences is not possible as the sentences in the batch vary among them in length.

 # inputs = [tf.squeeze(input_, [1])
 #           for input_ in tf.split(1, num_steps, inputs)]
 # outputs, states = rnn.rnn(cell, inputs, initial_state=self._initial_state)

Here, num_steps need to be changed in my case for every sentence. I have tried several hack, but nothing seems working.

  • Link requires Google account to read. – clearlight Jan 17 '17 at 9:06
up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can use the ideas of bucketing and padding which are described in:

    Sequence-to-Sequence Models

Also, the rnn function which creates RNN network accepts parameter sequence_length.

As an example, you can create buckets of sentences of the same size, pad them with the necessary amount of zeros, or placeholders which stand for zero word and afterwards feed them along with seq_length = len(zero_words).

seq_length = tf.placeholder(tf.int32)
outputs, states = rnn.rnn(cell, inputs, initial_state=initial_state, sequence_length=seq_length)

sess = tf.Session()
feed = {
    seq_length: 20,
    #other feeds
}
sess.run(outputs, feed_dict=feed)

Take a look at this reddit thread as well:

   Tensorflow basic RNN example with 'variable length' sequences

  • Do you thin padding sentences (or larger blocks of text) with zeros could cause a vanishing gradient problem? As an example, if our longest sentence has 1000 words and most other only have about 100 do you think a large number of zeros in the input could cause the gradient to vanish? – Mike Khan Jan 10 at 13:40
  • @MikeKhan, that is a legitimate concern. One way around that is to bucket you data into batches of uniform length since timesteps parameter need not be uniform across batches. – seeiespi Apr 25 at 20:57

You can use dynamic_rnn instead and specify length of every sequence even within one batch via passing array to sequence_length parameter. Example is below:

def length(sequence):
    used = tf.sign(tf.reduce_max(tf.abs(sequence), reduction_indices=2))
    length = tf.reduce_sum(used, reduction_indices=1)
    length = tf.cast(length, tf.int32)
    return length

from tensorflow.nn.rnn_cell import GRUCell

max_length = 100
frame_size = 64
num_hidden = 200

sequence = tf.placeholder(tf.float32, [None, max_length, frame_size])
output, state = tf.nn.dynamic_rnn(
    GRUCell(num_hidden),
    sequence,
    dtype=tf.float32,
    sequence_length=length(sequence),
)

Code is taken from a perfect article on the topic, please also check it.

Update: Another great post on dynamic_rnn vs rnn you can find

  • Here when we get different sizes of seq2seq what happen? The lstm get padded up to the largest one? – Shamane Siriwardhana Jun 6 '17 at 16:29
  • 1
    In this case no padding happens, because we explicitly pass length of each sequence to a function – Datalker Jun 8 '17 at 12:21

You can use ideas of bucketing and padding which are described in

   Sequence-to-Sequence Models

Also rnn function which creates RNN network accepts parameter sequence_length.

As example you can create buckets of sentances of the same size, padd them with necessary amount of zeros, or placeholdres which stands for zero word and afterwards feed them along with seq_length = len(zero_words).

seq_length = tf.placeholder(tf.int32)
outputs, states = rnn.rnn(cell, inputs,initial_state=initial_state,sequence_length=seq_length)

sess = tf.Session()
feed = {
seq_lenght: 20,
#other feeds
       }
sess.run(outputs, feed_dict=feed)

Here , the most important thing is , if you want to make use of the states obtained by one sentence as , the state for the next sentence , when you are providing sequence_length , ( lets say 20 and sentence after padding is 50 ) . You want the state obtained at the 20th time step . For that , do

tf.pack(states)

After that call

for i in range(len(sentences)):
state_mat   = session.run([states],{
            m.input_data: x,m.targets: y,m.initial_state: state,     m.early_stop:early_stop })
state = state_mat[early_stop-1,:,:]

You can limit the maximum length of your input sequences, pad the shorter ones to that length, record the length of each sequence and use tf.nn.dynamic_rnn . It processes input sequences as usual, but after the last element of a sequence, indicated by seq_length, it just copies the cell state through, and for output it outputs zeros-tensor.

  • is it possible to infer on sentences that are more than max sequence length during inference? – Sonal Gupta Oct 7 '16 at 2:49
  • @SonalGupta - Can you please be more specific ? – Seja Nair Oct 7 '16 at 5:06
  • @SonalGupta yes. During interference, just feed in one time-step input at a time, i.e. you unroll RNN for only one time step. – tnq177 Oct 7 '16 at 12:04
  • @Seja Nair: sorry, there is a typo in my question: "is it possible to infer on sentences that are more than max sequence length during training?". More specifically: stackoverflow.com/questions/39881639/… – Sonal Gupta Oct 7 '16 at 16:11
  • @tnq177: Wouldn't that beat the point of it being a sequential model? – Sonal Gupta Oct 7 '16 at 16:11

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