3

I have this program to generate all the permutations of a list. The thing is, I need to generate only the permutations in which the consecutive terms have the absolute difference less or equal than 3. Something like:

[2,7,5] => [2,5,7] and [7,5,2]. [2 7 5] would be wrong since 2-7 = -5 and |-5| > 3

The permutation program:

perm([X|Y],Z):-
    perm(Y,W),
    takeout(X,Z,W).
perm([],[]).

takeout(X,[X|R],R).
takeout(X,[F|R],[F|S]):-
    takeout(X,R,S).

permutfin(X,R):-
    findall(P,perm(X,P),R).

I know I'm supposed to add the condition somewhere in the perm function but I can't figure out exactly what or where to write.

  • Can you explain how your perm works, because you make it rather hard. There are more straightforward ways to do this... – Willem Van Onsem Jan 8 '16 at 22:34
3

A more intuitive way to write a permutation is:

takeout([X|T],X,T).
takeout([H|L],X,[H|T]) :-
    takeout(L,X,T).

Where the first element is the original list, the second the element picked, and the third the list without that element.

In that case the permutation predicate is defined as:

perm([],[]).
perm(L,[E|T]) :-
    takeout(L,E,R),
    perm(R,T).

this also allows tail-recursion which can imply an important optimization in most Prolog systems.

Now in order to generate only permutations with a consecutive difference of at most three, you can do two things:

  • The naive way is generate and test: here you let Prolog generate a permutation, but you only accept it if a certain condition is met. For instance:

    dif3([_]).
    dif3([A,B|T]) :-
        D is abs(A-B),
        D =< 3,
        dif3([B|T]).
    

    and then define:

    perm3(L,R) :-
        perm(L,R),
        dif3(R).
    

    This approach is not very efficient: it can be the case that for an exponential amount of permutations, only a few are valid, and this would imply a large computational effort. If for instance the list of elements is [2,5,7,9] it will generate all permutations starting with [2,9,...] while a more intelligent approach could already see that will never generate a valid solution anyway.

  • the other more intelligent approach is interleaved generate and test. Here you select only numbers with takeout3/4 that are valid candidates. You can define a predicate takeout3(L,P,X,T). where L is the original list, P the previous number, X the selected number and T the resulting list:

    takeout3([X|T],P,X,T) :-
        D is abs(X-P),
        D =< 3.
    takeout3([H|L],N,X,[H|T]) :-
        takeout3(L,N,X,T).
    

    Now we can generate a permutation as follows:

    perm3([],[]).
    perm3(L,[E|T]) :-
        takeout(L,E,R),
        perm3(R,E,T).
    
    perm3([],_,[]).
    perm3(L,O,[E|T]) :-
        takeout3(L,O,E,R),
        perm3(R,E,T).
    

    Mind we use two versions of perm3: perm3/2 and perm3/3, the first is used to generate the first element (using the old takeout/3), and perm3/3 is used to generate the remainder of the permutation using takeout3/4.

    The full source code of this approach is:

    takeout([X|T],X,T).
    takeout([H|L],X,[H|T]) :-
        takeout(L,X,T).
    
    takeout3([X|T],P,X,T) :-
        D is abs(X-P),
        D =< 3.
    takeout3([H|L],N,X,[H|T]) :-
        takeout3(L,N,X,T).
    
    perm3([],[]).
    perm3(L,[E|T]) :-
        takeout(L,E,R),
        perm3(R,E,T).
    
    perm3([],_,[]).
    perm3(L,O,[E|T]) :-
        takeout3(L,O,E,R),
        perm3(R,E,T).
    

    Running it with swipl gives:

    ?- perm3([2,7,5],L).
    L = [2, 5, 7] ;
    L = [7, 5, 2] ;
    false.
    

    The expected behavior.

  • 2
    Thank you! Very documented. Really helped me, – Mocktheduck Jan 9 '16 at 1:00
  • 1
    s(X) : clear and clean! – repeat Jan 9 '16 at 9:46
3

Here is another solution. I added the condition in takeout to make sure the adjacent items are within 3 of each other:

perm([X|Y],Z):-
    perm(Y,W),
    takeout(X,Z,W).
perm([],[]).

check(_,[]).
check(X,[H|_]) :-
    D is X - H,
    D < 4,
    D > -4.

takeout(X,[X|R],R) :-
    check(X,R).
takeout(X,[F|R],[F|S]):-
    takeout(X,R,S),
    check(F,R).
  • 1
    Yes. This will do the trick as well... – Willem Van Onsem Jan 8 '16 at 23:04

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