189

I am using a COM object (MODI) from within my .net application. The method I am calling throws a System.AccessViolationException, which is intercepted by Visual Studio. The odd thing is that I have wrapped my call in a try catch, which has handlers for AccessViolationException, COMException and everything else, but when Visual Studio (2010) intercepts the AccessViolationException, the debugger breaks on the method call (doc.OCR), and if I step through, it continues to the next line instead of entering the catch block. Additionally, if I run this outside of the visual studio my application crashes. How can I handle this exception that is thrown within the COM object?

MODI.Document doc = new MODI.Document();
try
{
    doc.Create(sFileName);
    try
    {
        doc.OCR(MODI.MiLANGUAGES.miLANG_ENGLISH, false, false);
        sText = doc.Images[0].Layout.Text;
    }
    catch (System.AccessViolationException ex)
    {
        //MODI seems to get access violations for some reason, but is still able to return the OCR text.
        sText = doc.Images[0].Layout.Text;
    }
    catch (System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException ex)
    {
        //if no text exists, the engine throws an exception.
        sText = "";
    }
    catch
    {
        sText = "";
    }

    if (sText != null)
    {
        sText = sText.Trim();
    }
}
finally
{
    doc.Close(false);

    //Cleanup routine, this is how we are able to delete files used by MODI.
    System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(doc);
    doc = null;
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

}
  • Have you tried putting an Exception handler in (temporarily!) to trap all exceptions and see what the exception actually is? – ChrisF Aug 12 '10 at 15:37
  • 3
    @ChrisF - yes, see the last catch handler? That should catch everything, including Exception and any subclass of Exception. As well, Visual studio reports that the exception is System.AccessViolationException – Jeremy Aug 12 '10 at 15:38
303

In .NET 4.0, the runtime handles certain exceptions raised as Windows Structured Error Handling (SEH) errors as indicators of Corrupted State. These Corrupted State Exceptions (CSE) are not allowed to be caught by your standard managed code. I won't get into the why's or how's here. Read this article about CSE's in the .NET 4.0 Framework:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419661.aspx#id0070035

But there is hope. There are a few ways to get around this:

  1. Recompile as a .NET 3.5 assembly and run it in .NET 4.0.

  2. Add a line to your application's config file under the configuration/runtime element: <legacyCorruptedStateExceptionsPolicy enabled="true|false"/>

  3. Decorate the methods you want to catch these exceptions in with the HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions attribute. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419661.aspx#id0070035 for details.


EDIT

Previously, I referenced a forum post for additional details. But since Microsoft Connect has been retired, here are the additional details in case you're interested:

From Gaurav Khanna, a developer from the Microsoft CLR Team

This behaviour is by design due to a feature of CLR 4.0 called Corrupted State Exceptions. Simply put, managed code shouldnt make an attempt to catch exceptions that indicate corrupted process state and AV is one of them.

He then goes on to reference the documentation on the HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptionsAttribute and the above article. Suffice to say, it's definitely worth a read if you're considering catching these types of exceptions.

| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions works for me in .Net 4.5. – deerchao May 26 '13 at 8:56
  • 2
    Thanks villecoder, you are a gem! I've been dealing with this issue for weeks, trying to solve the root problem, and finally resigned myself to treating the symptom. Your solution is perfect. – gadildafissh Jul 30 '13 at 18:45
  • 19
    ! To be aware: it is highly recommended to end the process after AccessViolationException that is a Corrupted State Exception (CSE). Otherwise it can lead to more critical errors. – Chris W Dec 8 '14 at 14:56
  • 6
    Thanks, this is really helpful, although at first I got the impression that I need to do all 3 steps to be able to catch these exceptions, while it's actually a "logical OR" of the ways to do it. :) – Lou Oct 10 '16 at 9:58
  • @deerchao I hope you have read the 1st link provided in answer. Handling CSE exceptions is a bad idea. – pixel Feb 20 '17 at 22:33
17

Add the following in the config file, and it will be caught in try catch block. Word of caution... try to avoid this situation, as this means some kind of violation is happening.

<configuration>
   <runtime>
      <legacyCorruptedStateExceptionsPolicy enabled="true" />
   </runtime>
</configuration>
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    For those who use c++/cli as a dll, the code should be added to the top .exe project. – Felix Jun 20 '17 at 2:34
9

Compiled from above answers, worked for me, did following steps to catch it.

Step #1 - Add following snippet to config file

<configuration>
   <runtime>
      <legacyCorruptedStateExceptionsPolicy enabled="true" />
   </runtime>
</configuration>

Step #2

Add -

[HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions]

[SecurityCritical]

on the top of function you are tying catch the exception

source: http://www.gisremotesensing.com/2017/03/catch-exception-attempted-to-read-or.html

| improve this answer | |
  • According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…, The SecurityCriticalAttribute is equivalent to a link demand for full trust. I don't think the problem described necessitates demanding full trust. – Jeremy Mar 23 '17 at 18:59
0

Microsoft: "Corrupted process state exceptions are exceptions that indicate that the state of a process has been corrupted. We do not recommend executing your application in this state.....If you are absolutely sure that you want to maintain your handling of these exceptions, you must apply the HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptionsAttribute attribute"

Microsoft: "Use application domains to isolate tasks that might bring down a process."

The program below will protect your main application/thread from unrecoverable failures without risks associated with use of HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions and <legacyCorruptedStateExceptionsPolicy>

public class BoundaryLessExecHelper : MarshalByRefObject
{
    public void DoSomething(MethodParams parms, Action action)
    {
        if (action != null)
            action();
        parms.BeenThere = true; // example of return value
    }
}

public struct MethodParams
{
    public bool BeenThere { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void InvokeCse()
    {
        IntPtr ptr = new IntPtr(123);
        System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.StructureToPtr(123, ptr, true);
    }

    private static void ExecInThisDomain()
    {
        try
        {
            var o = new BoundaryLessExecHelper();
            var p = new MethodParams() { BeenThere = false };
            Console.WriteLine("Before call");

            o.DoSomething(p, CausesAccessViolation);
            Console.WriteLine("After call. param been there? : " + p.BeenThere.ToString()); //never stops here
        }
        catch (Exception exc)
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"CSE: {exc.ToString()}");
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }


    private static void ExecInAnotherDomain()
    {
        AppDomain dom = null;

        try
        {
            dom = AppDomain.CreateDomain("newDomain");
            var p = new MethodParams() { BeenThere = false };
            var o = (BoundaryLessExecHelper)dom.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap(typeof(BoundaryLessExecHelper).Assembly.FullName, typeof(BoundaryLessExecHelper).FullName);         
            Console.WriteLine("Before call");

            o.DoSomething(p, CausesAccessViolation);
            Console.WriteLine("After call. param been there? : " + p.BeenThere.ToString()); // never gets to here
        }
        catch (Exception exc)
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"CSE: {exc.ToString()}");
        }
        finally
        {
            AppDomain.Unload(dom);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ExecInAnotherDomain(); // this will not break app
        ExecInThisDomain();  // this will
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
-1

You can try using AppDomain.UnhandledException and see if that lets you catch it.

**EDIT*

Here is some more information that might be useful (it's a long read).

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This answer is no longer complete accurate due to changes in the .NET framework. Prior to 4.0 it is correct. Per section of AccessViolationException and try/catch blocks in msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Tedford Aug 11 '17 at 17:52

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