5

My question is simple, about Future.traverse method. So I have a list of String-s. Each string is an URL to a web page. Then I have a class which can take an URL, load the web page and parse some data. All this is wrapped into Future{} so the result is processed asynchronously.

The class is simplified looking like this:

class RatingRetriever(context:ExecutionContext) {
  def resolveFilmToRating(url:String):Future[Option[Double]]={
    Future{
      //here it creates Selenium web driver, loads the url and parses it.
    }(context)
  }
}

Then in the other object I have this:

    implicit val executionContext = ExecutionContext.fromExecutor(Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2))
    .......
    val links:List[String] = films.map(film => film.asInstanceOf[WebElement].getAttribute("href"))
    val ratings: Future[List[Option[Double]]] = Future.traverse(links)(link => new RatingRetriever(executionContext).resolveFilmToRating(link))

When it works I can definitely see it goes through collection sequentially. If I change the execution context from fixed size pool to single thread pool the behavior is the same. So I really wonder how can I make the Future.traverse work in parallel. Can you advise?

  • Future.traverse does work in parallel. If you execution context has two fixed threads, it takes the first two links to load and parse, than the next two and so on. – Peter Neyens Jan 9 '16 at 14:46
  • @PeterNeyens : Probably. If that was so, I would not post this question :) I have debugged it quite a lot. So for each link a Selenium web driver instance is created which starts the Firefox browser and loads the page. If it took 2 links I would see 2 browsers, but I only see a single one opened, page loaded, then browser closed, then next one is opened, etc. If I change thread pool size to let's say 4 (I have 4 cores in my processor) then nothing changes. So probably the thing is not with Future.traversal, but with something else, but I can't figure it out... – Alexander Arendar Jan 9 '16 at 14:51
  • Then please provide some code that compiles that can show the behavior you are describing. – Michael Zajac Jan 9 '16 at 14:53
  • @m-z if I share the code in Github that would be ok? – Alexander Arendar Jan 9 '16 at 14:54
  • Code in GitHub: github.com/AlexanderArendar/IMDBAverage – Alexander Arendar Jan 9 '16 at 15:01
7

Take a look at traverse's sources:

in.foldLeft(successful(cbf(in))) { (fr, a) => //we sequentially traverse Collection
  val fb = fn(a)                        //Your function comes here
  for (r <- fr; b <- fb) yield (r += b) //Just add elem to builder
}.map(_.result())                       //Getting the collection from builder

So how much parallel you code is depends on your function fn, take a look at two examples:

1) This code:

import scala.concurrent.Future
import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global
object FutureTraverse extends App{
  def log(s: String) = println(s"${Thread.currentThread.getName}: $s")

  def withDelay(i: Int) = Future{
    log(s"withDelay($i)")
    Thread.sleep(1000)
    i
  }

  val seq = 0 to 10

  Future {
    for(i <- 0 to 5){
      log(".")
      Thread.sleep(1000)
    }
  }

  val resultSeq = Future.traverse(seq)(withDelay(_))

  Thread.sleep(6000)
}

Has such an output:

ForkJoinPool-1-worker-5: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-3: withDelay(0)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(1)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: withDelay(2)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-5: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-3: withDelay(3)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(4)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: withDelay(5)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-5: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-3: withDelay(6)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(7)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: withDelay(8)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-5: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-3: withDelay(9)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(10)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-5: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-5: .

2) Just change the withDelay function:

  def withDelay(i: Int) = {
    Thread.sleep(1000)
    Future {
      log(s"withDelay($i)")
      i
    }
  }

and you'll get a sequential output:

ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-5: withDelay(0)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(1)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(2)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(3)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: .
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(4)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: withDelay(5)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(6)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-1: withDelay(7)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: withDelay(8)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: withDelay(9)
ForkJoinPool-1-worker-7: withDelay(10)

So Future.traverse doesn't have to be a parallel one, it just submits tasks, it can do this sequentially, whole parallel thing is in your submitted function.

  • thanks. I understand your explanation and example but do not completely understand why in example 2) you have not just swap log() and Trhead.sleep() lines but moved Thread.sleep() out of the Future{} wrapper? – Alexander Arendar Jan 10 '16 at 8:49
  • 1
    Future submits a task for concurrent execution. More things inside Future block - more parrallel your code will be, because things outside Future block are executed sequentially - thats the main thing I wanted to tell, and Thread.sleep symbolizes time consuming operation – nikiforo Jan 10 '16 at 17:01
5

Scala's Future.traverse does work in parallel. How much is performed in parallel is determined by the ExecutionContext! Underneath, the Scala Future just schedules a task on a java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService. If a thread is available, the task is executed directly. Otherwise, it will be scheduled to run when one becomes available.

It's a bit difficult to see where in the Future.traverse implementation, the parallelism comes from

def traverse(in: M[A])(fn: A => Future[B]) =
  in.foldLeft(successful(cbf(in))) { (fr, a) =>
    val fb = fn(a)
    for (r <- fr; b <- fb) yield (r += b)
  }.map(_.result())

But the trick here is defining fb before the for-comprehension! By executing the fn function and therefore creating a Future instance, this Future is scheduled to run right away. The for-comprehension waits for the future to complete and add the result to the accumulator.

Its parallelism can easily be made visible by choosing a different ExecutionContext

val tp1 = java.concurrent.Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1)
implicit val ec = scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.fromExecutorService(tp1)
Future.traverse((1 to 5)) { n => Future { sleep; println(n); n }}
1
2
3
4
5

When increasing the number of threads, the functions will run in parallel

import scala.util.Random
import scala.concurrent.Future
def sleep = Thread.sleep(100 + Random.nextInt(1000))

val tp5 = java.util.concurrent.Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5)
implicit val ec = scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.fromExecutorService(tp5)
Future.traverse((1 to 5)) { n => Future { sleep; println(n); n }}
3
2
4
5
1
  • I think what's happening here is not that the function you pass to traverse is running concurrently, but rather the function you pass to Future. Traverse is still sequential, but of course you're free to start any kind of async work within your function, and that work can be run concurrently. The val fb = fn(a) line in the source of traverse is run for each item in the collection, in sequence. – mcobrien Apr 13 '18 at 11:24
0

@nikiforo clear, thanks. Regarding my particular problem it was that somehow selenium web-driver wants each instance to be instantiated in a separate thread if I want few browsers to work simultaneously. So I needed to use custom Thread implementation:

class FireFoxThread(r:Runnable) extends Thread(r:Runnable){
  val driver = new FirefoxDriver

  override def interrupt()={
    driver.quit
    super.interrupt
  }
}

And then instantiate it from ThreadFactory:

val executorService:ExecutorService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3, new ThreadFactory {
      override def newThread(r: Runnable): Thread = new FireFoxThread(r)
})

That way I was able to process my URLs in multiple browsers.

0

Future.traverse does work sequentially. It takes each of the items in the TraversableOnce you pass as an argument (links in this case), and creates a future using your mapping function. However, it only creates this future when the previous future has finished executing, which enforces the sequential behaviour you've seen.

You can see this clearly with a simple code example:

import scala.util.Random
import scala.concurrent.Future
import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global

def sleep = Thread.sleep(100 + Random.nextInt(5000))

Future.traverse((1 to 100)){n => sleep; println(n); Future.successful(n)}

This prints the numbers from 1 to 100 in series, and never out-of-order. If the futures were executed in parallel, the random sleep would ensure some items complete earlier than those dispatched before them, but this doesn't happen.

Looking at the source of Future.traverse, we can see why this is the case:

def traverse(in: M[A])(fn: A => Future[B]) =
  in.foldLeft(successful(cbf(in))) { (fr, a) =>
    val fb = fn(a)
    for (r <- fr; b <- fb) yield (r += b)
  }.map(_.result())

The for (r <- fr; b <- fb) part is a for comprehension that is calling flatMap on the future you provide. Once the future your callback creates (fb) has finished executing, it's added to the result list. This doesn't happen until the previous future (fr) has finished and can flatMap to its result.

If you want to submit a set of futures in parallel, you can use Future.sequential:

val retriver = new RatingRetriever(executionContext)
Future.sequence(links.map(link => retriver.resolveFilmToRating(link))

In this case, you're creating the futures in the links.map call and so they all start executing immediately. Future.sequence does the relatively simple work of transforming the list of futures into a list of their results.

  • I am not able to see Future.sequential in 2.11.9 or 2.12.3 source code of the Future companion object... Could you clarify? I can see Future.sequence. – Alexander Arendar Oct 24 '17 at 10:25
  • thanks @AlexanderArendar! I've edited the answer to specify Future.sequence. – mcobrien Oct 31 '17 at 18:07
  • 2
    @mcobrien Sorry to say you're wrong. Future.traverse is parallel. Have a look at my answer below. What you did wrong was doing the sleep outside of the Future. This effects the execution the foldLeft and since the Future completes immediately you would see everything sequencial. By moving the sleep function into the Future, you'll see results popping up randomly. – Joost den Boer Apr 12 '18 at 9:58

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