I've been asked to create a function that calculates the number of negative, zero and positive numbers on a [Int]. The result should then be written on a tuple (nrOfNeg,nrOfZeros,nrOfPos).

nzp [0,-1,1,2,0,3] = (1,2,3)

However, the list must be covered only once (meaning that tuple should update every element it is evaluated on [Int]).

Something like:

nzp [***0***,-1,1,2,0,3] = (0,1,0)
nzp [0,***-1***,1,2,0,3] = (1,1,0)
nzp [0,-1,***1***,2,0,3] = (1,1,1)
...

This is what I made so far, but it "uses" 3 times the list to calculate.

nzp :: [Int] -> (Int,Int,Int)
nzp l = (neg,zeros,pos)
        where neg = length (filter (<0) l)
              zeros = length (filter (==0) l)
              pos = length (filter (>0) l)

Is there any way to increment the tuple specific position while evaluating elements of [Int]?

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is a good use case for foldl:

nzp :: [Int] -> (Int, Int, Int)
nzp = foldl accountForNumber (0, 0, 0)
      where accountForNumber (lt, eq, gt) x | x < 0 = (lt + 1, eq, gt)
            accountForNumber (lt, eq, gt) x | x > 0 = (lt, eq, gt + 1)
            accountForNumber (lt, eq, gt) _ | otherwise = (lt, eq + 1, gt)
  • 2
    Th question is obviously homework so you shouldn't if possible to reveal the solution ;-) – mb14 Jan 9 '16 at 16:03
  • 1
    hmmm good point. will consider that next time. – obadz Jan 9 '16 at 16:05
  • Works like charm. Thanks. So, am I able to use any function as a parameter of fold? – user4709293 Jan 9 '16 at 16:08
  • Any function with the appropriate type signature: Since foldl :: Foldable t => (b -> a -> b) -> b -> t a -> b, the function you pass as your first argument must be of type b -> a -> b, where b is the same as the type of your second argument, in this case (Int, Int, Int) – obadz Jan 9 '16 at 16:13
  • To avoid relying on compiler optimizations, you should use foldl' and ensure that the components of the triples are forced appropriately. – dfeuer Jan 9 '16 at 19:24

The boring way

count :: (Num a, Ord a, Foldable f) => f a -> (Int, Int, Int)
count = foldl' go (0, 0, 0) where
  go (!neg, !zer, !pos) x =
    case compare x 0 of
      LT -> (neg + 1, zer, pos)
      EQ -> (neg, zer + 1, pos)
      GT -> (neg, zer, pos + 1)

The fun way

Use the foldl package

import qualified Control.Foldl as Fl
import Control.Lens.Fold

countF :: (a -> Bool) -> Fl.Fold a Int
countF p = Fl.handles (filtered p) Fl.length

count = Fl.fold ((,,) <$> countF (<0) <*> countF (==0) <*> countF (>0))

You can't really update a tuple, as value are immutable in Haskell. However, you can create a new one from the previous one with the updated value. Hint, use fold or simple recursion.

  • I thought of generating a list of tuples and then use fold to sum them. But I am covering 2 lists (different, I know, but 2) anyway... – user4709293 Jan 9 '16 at 15:59
  • 1
    just fold your list to the tuples. The function in fold take two arguments, the element being scanned and last tuples. – mb14 Jan 9 '16 at 16:02

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