62

In Scala, one can easily do a parallel map, forEach, etc, with:

collection.par.map(..)

Is there an equivalent in Kotlin?

1

12 Answers 12

72

The Kotlin standard library has no support for parallel operations. However, since Kotlin uses the standard Java collection classes, you can use the Java 8 stream API to perform parallel operations on Kotlin collections as well.

e.g.

myCollection.parallelStream()
        .map { ... }
        .filter { ... }
5
  • 2
    how can one use Java 8 stream API in Kotlin?
    – LordScone
    Commented Feb 20, 2016 at 14:36
  • 2
    @LordScone The same way as you'd do it in Java. E.g.: myCollection.parallelStream().map { ... }. filter { ... } Commented Sep 11, 2017 at 12:26
  • just for information, parallelStream is only advised in case of long lists, for smaller lists, it will be an overhead to run the 2 jobs in different threads as in java world. Stick to coroutines as far as possible
    – MozenRath
    Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 17:49
  • parallelStream is Java, not kotlin, that's why it requires Java 8 Commented Sep 9, 2021 at 8:44
  • 1
    @MozenRath what if we have lists not long, but items in list may take a long time to finish. Would you advise parallelStream ?
    – sherelock
    Commented Nov 27, 2022 at 16:20
50

As of Kotlin 1.1, parallel operations can also be expressed quite elegantly in terms of coroutines. Here is a custom pmap helper function for lists:

fun <A, B>List<A>.pmap(f: suspend (A) -> B): List<B> = runBlocking {
    map { async(Dispatchers.Default) { f(it) } }.map { it.await() }
}
8
  • 4
    With Kotlin 1.3 out, is this still the best answer? I noticed @OlivierTerrien's Stream answer below, but I'd prefer to stick with Kotlin Sequences and Iterables.
    – Benjamin H
    Commented Nov 1, 2018 at 19:57
  • 66
    Quite elegantly? On the contrary, the code is pretty hard to read I would say. Commented Feb 20, 2019 at 22:29
  • 7
    @DzmitryLazerka I think I see where you're coming from, but this exact code isn't the elegant bit. The use of this code is what's elegant. If the above method is placed somewhere, it can be used with just foo.pmap { v -> ... }. I think that's fairly elegant. Commented Jun 19, 2019 at 21:16
  • 1
    Currently 'CommonPool' cannot be accessed - it is internal in 'kotlinx.coroutines'!
    – Strinder
    Commented Jun 9, 2020 at 19:41
  • 1
    .map { it.await() } can now be replaced with .awaitAll().
    – Tenfour04
    Commented Jul 20, 2022 at 13:22
32

You can use this extension method:

suspend fun <A, B> Iterable<A>.pmap(f: suspend (A) -> B): List<B> = coroutineScope {
    map { async { f(it) } }.awaitAll()
}

See Parallel Map in Kotlin for more info

17

There is no official support in Kotlin's stdlib yet, but you could define an extension function to mimic par.map:

fun <T, R> Iterable<T>.pmap(
          numThreads: Int = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors() - 2, 
          exec: ExecutorService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numThreads),
          transform: (T) -> R): List<R> {

    // default size is just an inlined version of kotlin.collections.collectionSizeOrDefault
    val defaultSize = if (this is Collection<*>) this.size else 10
    val destination = Collections.synchronizedList(ArrayList<R>(defaultSize))

    for (item in this) {
        exec.submit { destination.add(transform(item)) }
    }

    exec.shutdown()
    exec.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.DAYS)

    return ArrayList<R>(destination)
}

(github source)

Here's a simple usage example

val result = listOf("foo", "bar").pmap { it+"!" }.filter { it.contains("bar") }

If needed it allows to tweak threading by providing the number of threads or even a specific java.util.concurrent.Executor. E.g.

listOf("foo", "bar").pmap(4, transform = { it + "!" })

Please note, that this approach just allows to parallelize the map operation and does not affect any downstream bits. E.g. the filter in the first example would run single-threaded. However, in many cases just the data transformation (ie. map) requires parallelization. Furthermore, it would be straightforward to extend the approach from above to other elements of Kotlin collection API.

6
  • I don't see how "destination.add(transform(item))" is thread safe. What's to keep two threads from calling "destination.add" at the same time, thus breaking stuff since ArrayList.add() is not a thread safe operation? Commented Mar 22, 2016 at 20:55
  • Thanks for the hint. Quite some people think that when just adding elements it should be fine without synchronization. However, I've changed it to use a synchronized list to improve thread-safety. Commented Mar 23, 2016 at 10:25
  • 1
    The order in destination may not be the same as in the original list Commented Mar 24, 2016 at 12:08
  • 1
    I think many parallel collection implementations (like in scala) do not care about preserving order. Though, by changing the for-each loop above to an indexed loop along with downstream resorting, order could be preserved easily. Commented Mar 29, 2016 at 18:36
  • I'm interested in a version that returns a Sequence<R> (or Flow<R>). Unfortunately I can't simply have the whole code execute in an = execute{ block and call yield instead of destination.add because yield can only execute in the original block, so within exec.submit { } is not an option. (Order need not be preserved.)
    – StephanS
    Commented Nov 2, 2019 at 2:44
13

From 1.2 version, kotlin added a stream feature which is compliant with JRE8

So, iterating over a list asynchronously could be done like bellow:

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
  val c = listOf("toto", "tata", "tutu")
  c.parallelStream().forEach { println(it) }
}
6
  • I am not following kotlin very closely; isn't this the same as Yole's answer?I appreciate that your answer has sample code. Maybe we can edit Yole's answer to add the sample code.
    – HRJ
    Commented Dec 31, 2018 at 3:49
  • @HRJ, not exactly. Yole said Kotlin had no support for stream which is true until version 1.2. Since this version, Kotlin provides a way to stream collections as Java8 does. Commented Jan 1, 2019 at 12:13
  • Yole said "Kotlin has no support for parallel operations". Please check again.
    – HRJ
    Commented Jan 1, 2019 at 13:48
  • Yes you are right. Too quickly written. Parallel operations not stream. Commented Jan 1, 2019 at 13:53
  • 1
    Nothing in this answer is Kotlin per se, it is calling Java standard library. Which is not bad, just not Kotlin specific. Commented Oct 30, 2022 at 17:47
5

Kotlin wants to be idiomatic but not too much synthetic to be hard to understand at a first glance.

Parallel computation trough Coroutines is no exception. They want it to be easy but not implicit with some pre-built method, allowing to branch the computation when needed.

In your case:

collection.map { 
        async{ produceWith(it) } 
    }
    .forEach { 
        consume(it.await()) 
    }

Notice that to call async and await you need to be inside a so called Context, you cannot make suspending calls or launching a coroutine from a non-coroutine context. To enter one you can either:

  • runBlocking { /* your code here */ }: it will suspend the current thread until the lambda returns.
  • GlobalScope.launch { }: it will execute the lambda in parallel; if your main finishes executing while your coroutines have not bad things will happen, in that case better use runBlocking.

Hope it may helps :)

2
  • While I appreciate Kotlin not wanting to be opaque, surely this is a common enough requirement to warrant an extension method? forEachParallel or something similar Commented May 28, 2020 at 15:26
  • Do not use GlobalScope. Commented Oct 30, 2022 at 17:49
4

At the present moment no. The official Kotlin comparison to Scala mentions:

Things that may be added to Kotlin later:

  • Parallel collections
3

This solution assumes that your project is using coroutines:

implementation( "org.jetbrains.kotlinx:kotlinx-coroutines-core:1.3.2")

The functions called parallelTransform don't retain the order of elements and return a Flow<R>, while the function parallelMap retains the order and returns a List<R>.

Create a threadpool for multiple invocations:

val numberOfCores = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors()
val executorDispatcher: ExecutorCoroutineDispatcher =
    Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numberOfCores ).asCoroutineDispatcher()

use that dispatcher (and call close() when it's no longer needed):

inline fun <T, R> Iterable<T>.parallelTransform(
    dispatcher: ExecutorDispatcher,
    crossinline transform: (T) -> R
): Flow<R> = channelFlow {

    val items: Iterable<T> = this@parallelTransform
    val channelFlowScope: ProducerScope<R> = this@channelFlow

    launch(dispatcher) {
        items.forEach {item ->
            launch {
                channelFlowScope.send(transform(item))
            }
        }
    }
}

If threadpool reuse is of no concern (threadpools aren't cheap), you can use this version:

inline fun <T, R> Iterable<T>.parallelTransform(
    numberOfThreads: Int,
    crossinline transform: (T) -> R
): Flow<R> = channelFlow {

    val items: Iterable<T> = this@parallelTransform
    val channelFlowScope: ProducerScope<R> = this@channelFlow

    Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numberOfThreads).asCoroutineDispatcher().use { dispatcher ->
        launch( dispatcher ) {
            items.forEach { item ->
                launch {
                    channelFlowScope.send(transform(item))
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

if you need a version that retains the order of elements:

inline fun <T, R> Iterable<T>.parallelMap(
    dispatcher: ExecutorDispatcher,
    crossinline transform: (T) -> R
): List<R> = runBlocking {

    val items: Iterable<T> = this@parallelMap
    val result = ConcurrentSkipListMap<Int, R>()

    launch(dispatcher) {
        items.withIndex().forEach {(index, item) ->
            launch {
                result[index] = transform(item)
            }
        }
    }

    // ConcurrentSkipListMap is a SortedMap
    // so the values will be in the right order
    result.values.toList()
}
3

You can mimic the Scala API by using extension properties and inline classes. Using the coroutine solution from @Sharon answer, you can write it like this

val <A> Iterable<A>.par get() = ParallelizedIterable(this)

@JvmInline
value class ParallelizedIterable<A>(val iter: Iterable<A>) {
    suspend fun <B> map(f: suspend (A) -> B): List<B> = coroutineScope {
        iter.map { async { f(it) } }.awaitAll()
    }
}

with this, now your code can change from

anIterable.map { it.value } 

to

anIterable.par.map { it.value } 

also you can change the entry point as you like other than using extension properties, e.g.

fun <A> Iterable<A>.parallel() = ParallelizedIterable(this)

anIterable.parallel().map { it.value } 

You can also use another parallel solution and implement the rest of iterable methods inside ParallelizedIterable while still having the same method names for the operations

The drawback is that this implementation can only parallelize one operation after it, to make it so that it parallelize every subsequent operation, you may need to modify ParallelizedIterable further so it return its own type instead of returning back to List<A>

1
  • What's the point of a value class if the constructor parameter is not a primitive? Commented May 5 at 22:09
2

I found this:

implementation 'com.github.cvb941:kotlin-parallel-operations:1.3'

details:

https://github.com/cvb941/kotlin-parallel-operations

2

I've come up with a couple of extension functions:

  1. The suspend extension function on Iterable<T> type, which does a parallel processing of items and returns some result of processing each item. By default it uses Dispatchers.IO dispatcher to offload blocking tasks to a shared pool of threads. Must be called from a coroutine (including a coroutine with Dispatchers.Main dispatcher) or another suspend function.

    suspend fun <T, R> Iterable<T>.processInParallel(
        dispatcher: CoroutineDispatcher = Dispatchers.IO,
        processBlock: suspend (v: T) -> R,
    ): List<R> = coroutineScope { // or supervisorScope
        map {
            async(dispatcher) { processBlock(it) }
        }.awaitAll()
    }
    

    Example of calling from a coroutine:

    val collection = listOf("A", "B", "C", "D", "E")
    
    someCoroutineScope.launch {
        val results = collection.processInParallel {
            process(it)
        }
        // use processing results
    }
    

where someCoroutineScope is an instance of CoroutineScope.

  1. Launch and forget extension function on CoroutineScope, which doesn't return any result. It also uses Dispatchers.IO dispatcher by default. Can be called using CoroutineScope or from another coroutine.

    fun <T> CoroutineScope.processInParallelAndForget(
        iterable: Iterable<T>,
        dispatcher: CoroutineDispatcher = Dispatchers.IO,
        processBlock: suspend (v: T) -> Unit
    ) = iterable.forEach {
        launch(dispatcher) { processBlock(it) }
    }
    

    Example of calling:

    someoroutineScope.processInParallelAndForget(collection) {
        process(it)
    }
    
    // OR from another coroutine:
    
    someCoroutineScope.launch {
        processInParallelAndForget(collection) {
            process(it)
        }
    }
    

2a. Launch and forget extension function on Iterable<T>. It's almost the same as previous, but the extension type is different. CoroutineScope must be passed as argument to the function.

fun <T> Iterable<T>.processInParallelAndForget(
    scope: CoroutineScope,
    dispatcher: CoroutineDispatcher = Dispatchers.IO,
    processBlock: suspend (v: T) -> Unit
) = forEach {
    scope.launch(dispatcher) { processBlock(it) }
}

Calling:

collection.processInParallelAndForget(someCoroutineScope) {
    process(it)
}

// OR from another coroutine:

someScope.launch {
    collection.processInParallelAndForget(this) {
        process(it)
    }
}
0
list_x.chunked(list_x.size/max_parallelism_desired) {
  async {
    it.map { item -> process(item) }
  }
}.flatMap { it.await() }
1
  • Thank you for your interest in contributing to the Stack Overflow community. This question already has quite a few answers—including one that has been extensively validated by the community. Are you certain your approach hasn’t been given previously? If so, it would be useful to explain how your approach is different, under what circumstances your approach might be preferred, and/or why you think the previous answers aren’t sufficient. Can you kindly edit your answer to offer an explanation? Commented May 16 at 0:53

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