1

If I run the code below it won't display the whole answer (last printf("") is the answer). I would like to know why it doesn't display the whole answer. Does anyone know this problem?

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int M,T,P,K,H;
    printf("Teekonna pikkus:\n");
    scanf("%u", &P);
    printf("Tarbitud k\u00FCtuse kogus:\n");
    scanf("%u", &K);
    printf("K\u00FCtuse liitri hind:\n");
    scanf("%u", &H);
    T = K/(P/100);
    M = K*H;
    printf("Olete s\u00F5itnud %u", P," kilomeetrit ning kulutanud %u", K," liitrit kütust. Teie auto k\u00FCtusekulu oli %u", T," liitrit 100 kilomeetri kohta. S\u00F5idu maksumus oli %u", M," eurot.");
    while(1);
}
3
  • 1
    Why do you have a while(1) at the end of your program? First of all, lookup printf syntax. Then printf is probably not flushing the string to stdout, try adding a \n at the end of the format string, or add fflush(stdout); after the printf statement. Also, technically your program has undefined behavior because you have a infinite loop. – Praetorian Jan 10 '16 at 0:59
  • @Praetorian while(1) is possibly for not to lose the console window. a getch or scanf would be better of course. – Sedat Kapanoglu Jan 10 '16 at 1:05
  • @SedatKapanoglu You are right, it was written there for that :) – Mihkel Kull Jan 10 '16 at 1:09
7

The printf has the following syntax:

int printf ( const char * format, ... );

the first parameter is the format and all the others variables can substitute placeholders present in the format.

You should write:

printf("Olete s\u00F5itnud %u kilomeetrit ning kulutanud %u liitrit kütust. Teie auto k\u00FCtusekulu oli %u liitrit 100 kilomeetri kohta. S\u00F5idu maksumus oli %u eurot.", P, K, T, M);
2

That isn't the way printf works. Put all the arguments after the format string.

printf("Olete s\u00F5itnud %u kilomeetrit ning kulutanud %u liitrit kütust. Teie auto k\u00FCtusekulu oli %u liitrit 100 kilomeetri kohta. S\u00F5idu maksumus oli %u" eurot.", P, K, T, M);
0
1

There are 2 problems in the code:

  • printf() should be used as: printf("P: %d - T: %d\n", P, T);

  • but there is also the possibility of a division by zero:

T = K/(P/100);

P is an integer, and if P/100 becomes small enough, it will be rounded off to 0. Then K/0 (zero) will create a problem.

So, those values should be checked before division. And it might be better to use (or convert to) float or double for some variables.

2
  • T = K/(P/100); was actually suggested by my teacher so it shouldn't make any problems, but thanks for the info :) – Mihkel Kull Jan 10 '16 at 1:10
  • @MihkelKull - You can be sure it is a problem :) - You really should check those values, and maybe even use floats instead. (try using P<100 for example) – Danny_ds Jan 10 '16 at 1:30
0

printf() output is based on the first string parameter (formatting string), replacing the special % characters ("formatting specifier) in it with the additional parameters following the string.

So it displays only what you've asked to display, because you have only %u (unsigned int, which corresponds to P). The remaining parameters are ignored, as no other formatting specifier can be found in the formatting string

You should concatenate all the formatting strings:

  printf (""Olete s\u00F5itnud %u  kilomeetrit ning kulutanud %u ...%u...%u...", P, K, T, M); 
2
  • Firstly, I think <iostream> (not <iostreams>, by the way) is an absolutely terrible API, for many reasons. And secondly, the question is tagged with c and not c++. The fact that <stdio.h> (or <cstdio>) remains popular even in C++ says a lot, and it's definitely not legacy (even in C++, let alone in C!). – Tim Čas Jan 10 '16 at 1:14
  • @TimČas sorry, but it was tagged c++ when I answered. About using printf vs. streams in C++: you may have your opinion on that. It's just that printf() doesn't allow for object orientation as much as streams allow it. Now with a C tag, this is no longer an issue – Christophe Jan 10 '16 at 1:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.