23

I've looked at several SO posts about this: I want to darken the current background image by adding an overlay.

#header1 {
  background: url("http://lorempixel.com/image_output/cats-q-c-640-480-10.jpg");
  background-position:center center;
  position: relative;
  background-size: cover;
  padding-bottom:5em;
}
.overlay {
  background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1;
}
<div class="header">
  <div class="overlay">
    <div class="jumbotron" id="header1">
      <h1>Hello</h1>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Maybe I'm not understanding how to use z-index, or maybe I'm missing something here. The darker background used for tinting isn't showing up. Any pointers?

1

6 Answers 6

27

Use Linear gradient

to darken the background refer to this codepen and this link

<div class="bg-img"></div>

.bg-img {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background: url('http://alexcarpenter.me/img/banner.jpg') center center no-repeat;
  background-size: cover;

  &:before {
    content: '';
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
        bottom: 0;
        left: 0;
        background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom right,#002f4b,#dc4225);
        opacity: .6; 
  }
}
1
  • This is nice :) CSS gradients, awesome! Commented Mar 2, 2019 at 8:11
16

#header1 {
    background: url("https://www.random.org/analysis/randbitmap-rdo.png");/*Random image I grabbed*/
    background-size: cover;
}

h1 {
    color: white;
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    padding-top: 10px;
    padding-bottom: 100px;
    padding-left: 20px;
    padding-right: 20px;
}
<div class="header">
    <div class="overlay">
        <div class="jumbotron" id="header1">
            <h1>Hello</h1>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

As intended the h1 acts as an extra visual layer and its padding covers the #header1.

A second solution would be to add the original background image to .header and have the styles from h1 given to #overlay and with a bit of tweaking that should also do the trick.

And yet another possible solution(similar to the second one) you can add the background-image to overlay and have the h1 styles from the example I gave to #header1 or .jumbotron

In addition to the first solution, you should be able to add extra layer by adding a background-color: to overlay. I'm not sure how it will effect the background exactly but from what I'm guessing it should just add an extra layer of color.

Here is a personal example where I used this technique.

Example

3
  • I got the darkened background to come up, but it's not stretched all the way, as in there are some parts of the image that isn't covered by the darker background. How do I adjust the height of the darkened background? Commented Jan 10, 2016 at 6:33
  • How about you take away the margin of h1? Then add padding-top and padding-bottom to h1. That should work. You add padding to stretch the dark overlay. So in your actual example you may have to add or decrease the padding of the element with the dark overlay.
    – HTMLNoob
    Commented Jan 10, 2016 at 6:38
  • Adding padding changes both the dark background AND the original background image. Any other suggestions? Commented Jan 10, 2016 at 7:09
3
#header1 {
background: url("https://www.random.org/analysis/randbitmap-rdo.png");/*Random image I grabbed*/,
box-shadow: "0px 4px 4px 0px #00000040,inset 0 0 0 1000px rgba(0,0,0,.5)"
}

You don't need the overlay if you add a box shadow. The inner box-shadows work as an overlay. You can adjust the opacity by changing the .5 up or down.

1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Jan 27, 2022 at 0:30
2

You can also use this CSS:

filter: brightness(50%);
0

The z-index property specifies the stack order of an element. An element with greater stack order is always in front of an element with a lower stack order. for your answer, you can visit css-tricks

0

I guess you would like to completely hide the background image, Then you need to set the value of alpha to 1 in rgba(0,0,0,1)

0.7 defines the transparency level you need the particular element to be shown.

below link explain concept of overlaying with very good examples

http://tympanus.net/codrops/2013/11/07/css-overlay-techniques/

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