10

Suppose there are n queues of positive numbers. I need to minimum sum of k numbers selected from these queues. Note that these are queues so ordering is important and only first number can be selected from any queue at a time. Once that number is selected and removed from queue we can proceed to the next one in that queue. So sorting is not allowed(order is important).

For example:

Find minimum sum of two numbers

2 12 3 4 
8 2 2
10 10

In the above example I can either choose 2 from first queue and 8 from second or 8 and 2 both from second. Both choices give sum 10.

Example 2:

Find minimum sum of two numbers

4 15 2
8 2 2
10 10

In the above example one has to choose 8 and 2 both from second list.

I was first thinking on the line of merge K sorted lists but it won't work. I can only think of one working approach for this. It is to try all the combinations from all the queues. Can someone suggest a better way or guide me towards it?

  • Is it right that all selected numbers should be different? That is one can't choose 2 two times. – Nikolay Polivanov Jan 11 '16 at 5:49
  • No, elements can be repeated. So 2 can be chosen two times. – Pukki Jan 11 '16 at 5:50
  • But you're saying "one has to choose 8 and 2 both from second list." - I see 2 is repeated 3 times in 2nd example. Why it can't be chosen twice giving sum 4? – Nikolay Polivanov Jan 11 '16 at 5:51
  • 1
    @NikolayPolivanov Ordering is important. So one has to choose 8 before choosing 2 from the second queue. Also, we only need to choose two elements such that the sum is lowest. – Pukki Jan 11 '16 at 5:52
  • 2
    @Pukki Why can't we choose both 2's from the first queue then for a sum of 4? – Paulpro Jan 11 '16 at 5:59
13

Let F(qs, k) be the minimum sum from choosing k numbers from the queues qs. Then:

F([], k) = 0 if k == 0, otherwise +infinity.
F([q] + qs, k) = min_i(q[0] + q[1] + ... + q[i-1] + F(qs, k-i) for i in 0...k)

That is, if you've no queues left, the min sum is 0, otherwise, you can take i numbers from the first queue, and k-i from the rest.

This can be solved efficiently using dynamic programming by building a table of (n, k) where n is the number of queues. In Python 2:

def F(qs, n, k, cache):
    if k == 0:
        return 0
    if n == 0:
        return 1e12
    if (n, k) not in cache:
        best = 1e12
        s = 0
        for i in xrange(k+1):
            if i > len(qs[len(qs)-n]):
                break
            if i > 0:
                s += qs[len(qs)-n][i-1]
            best = min(best, s + F(qs, n-1, k-i, cache))
        cache[n, k] = best
    return cache[n, k]

egs = [
    (2, [[2, 2, 3, 4], [8, 2, 2], [10, 10]]),
    (2, [[4, 15, 2], [8, 2, 2], [10, 10]]),
    (3, [[100, 100, 100], [101, 101, 2]])
]

for k, qs in egs:
    print k, qs
    print F(qs, len(qs), k, dict())
    print

Prints

2 [[2, 2, 3, 4], [8, 2, 2], [10, 10]]
4

2 [[4, 15, 2], [8, 2, 2], [10, 10]]
10

3 [[100, 100, 100], [101, 101, 2]]
204
  • Seems correct and brilliant. I will just check it a little and then accept. – Pukki Jan 11 '16 at 6:19
  • It seems so simple after you know the answer. Thanks. – Pukki Jan 11 '16 at 6:29
  • 1
    Isn't it the same as trying all combinations, with an elegant optimization of dynamic programming? – Pukki Jan 11 '16 at 6:34
  • 1
    @2501 It's not factorial due to cache -- O(n k^2) assuming constant-time hashing. – David Eisenstat Jan 11 '16 at 23:19
  • 1
    @ColonelPanic you can only take numbers from the start of the lists. – Paul Hankin Jan 14 '16 at 0:15
0

First try solving a simpler problem: How to find the smallest k elements from an array length m?

Initialise a max-heap size k from the first k elements of the array (yes max-heap rather than min-heap). Loop over the rest of the array. At each step, compare the current element with the root of the heap (this is the kth smallest element seen so far). If the current element is smaller, remove the heap root and insert the current element, being careful to maintain the heap-invariant.

When done, the heap contains the smallest k elements from the array. The algorithm has time complexity O(m log k) and space complexity O(k)


Implementation in Python. Python has only a min-heap module, so emulate a max-heap by taking the negative of everything.

import heapq # min-heap operations 

def sum_smallest_k(queues, k):
    """Sum the smallest k elements across queues"""
    heap = [] # maintain a max-heap size k

    for queue in queues:
        for x in queue:
            if len(heap) < k:
                heapq.heappush(heap, -1 * x)
            else:
                heapq.heappushpop(heap, -1 * x)

    return -1 * sum(heap)

Your examples

>>> sum_smallest_k([[2, 12, 3, 4], [8, 2, 2], [10, 10]], 2)
4
>>> sum_smallest_k([[4, 15, 2], [8, 2, 2], [10, 10]], 2)
4
  • 1
    How is this applicable to my question? Are you suggesting some tweak in your algorithm that would then fit my problem? Otherwise I don't see it working. – Pukki Jan 11 '16 at 16:38
  • You have n arrays. Pretend you just have one long array. – Colonel Panic Jan 11 '16 at 17:40
  • @Pukki If it helps, here's a Python implementation – Colonel Panic Jan 11 '16 at 18:07
  • This does not solve the problem of taking exactly k elements from the n queues. Instead, it drains a queue (or the concatenation of n queues). – greybeard Jan 11 '16 at 18:16
  • 2
    In the second example, it is choosing both 2s from the second array and gives result 4. If I choose 2 at index 1 and 2 at index 2 then I must choose 8 at index 0. So total will be 8 + 2 + 2 = 12. When actually the result should be 8 + 2 = 10 both from second array. It is giving wrong answer in the first example also. I think you are missing the point that the question tries to make. These are queues so if you deque any element then it is a part of your collection. – Pukki Jan 11 '16 at 18:19

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