If I want to use the BatchNormalization function in Keras, then do I need to call it once only at the beginning?

I read this documentation for it: http://keras.io/layers/normalization/

I don't see where I'm supposed to call it. Below is my code attempting to use it:

model = Sequential()
keras.layers.normalization.BatchNormalization(epsilon=1e-06, mode=0, momentum=0.9, weights=None)
model.add(Dense(64, input_dim=14, init='uniform'))
model.add(Activation('tanh'))
model.add(Dropout(0.5))
model.add(Dense(64, init='uniform'))
model.add(Activation('tanh'))
model.add(Dropout(0.5))
model.add(Dense(2, init='uniform'))
model.add(Activation('softmax'))

sgd = SGD(lr=0.1, decay=1e-6, momentum=0.9, nesterov=True)
model.compile(loss='binary_crossentropy', optimizer=sgd)
model.fit(X_train, y_train, nb_epoch=20, batch_size=16, show_accuracy=True, validation_split=0.2, verbose = 2)

I ask because if I run the code with the second line including the batch normalization and if I run the code without the second line I get similar outputs. So either I'm not calling the function in the right place, or I guess it doesn't make that much of a difference.

up vote 123 down vote accepted

Just to answer this question in a little more detail, and as Pavel said, Batch Normalization is just another layer, so you can use it as such to create your desired network architecture.

The general use case is to use BN between the linear and non-linear layers in your network, because it normalizes the input to your activation function, so that you're centered in the linear section of the activation function (such as Sigmoid). There's a small discussion of it here

In your case above, this might look like:


# import BatchNormalization
from keras.layers.normalization import BatchNormalization

# instantiate model
model = Sequential()

# we can think of this chunk as the input layer
model.add(Dense(64, input_dim=14, init='uniform'))
model.add(BatchNormalization())
model.add(Activation('tanh'))
model.add(Dropout(0.5))

# we can think of this chunk as the hidden layer    
model.add(Dense(64, init='uniform'))
model.add(BatchNormalization())
model.add(Activation('tanh'))
model.add(Dropout(0.5))

# we can think of this chunk as the output layer
model.add(Dense(2, init='uniform'))
model.add(BatchNormalization())
model.add(Activation('softmax'))

# setting up the optimization of our weights 
sgd = SGD(lr=0.1, decay=1e-6, momentum=0.9, nesterov=True)
model.compile(loss='binary_crossentropy', optimizer=sgd)

# running the fitting
model.fit(X_train, y_train, nb_epoch=20, batch_size=16, show_accuracy=True, validation_split=0.2, verbose = 2)

Hope this clarifies things a bit more.

  • 12
    FYI apparently batch normalization works better in practice after the activation function – Claudiu Oct 5 '16 at 9:39
  • 4
    Hi @Claudiu, would you mind expanding on this FYI? It appears to directly contradict the answer above. – Ben Ogorek Oct 6 '16 at 12:51
  • 6
    @benogorek: sure thing, basically I based it entirely on the results here where placing the batch norm after the relu performed better. FWIW I haven't had success applying it one way or the other on the one net I've tried – Claudiu Oct 6 '16 at 13:41
  • 9
    Interesting. Just to follow up, if you continue to read on in that summary, it says that their best model [GoogLeNet128_BN_lim0606] actually has the BN layer BEFORE the ReLU. So while BN after Activation might improve accuracy in an isolated case, when the whole model is constructed, before performed best. Likely it's possible that placing BN after Activation could improve accuracy, but is likely problem dependent. – Lucas Ramadan Oct 6 '16 at 20:55
  • 3
    Wow, that benchmark is really interesting. Does anyone have any intuition regarding what the hell is going on there? Why would it be better to offset and scale activations after a nonlinearity? Is it that the betas and gammas have to deal with less variety or something, and thus the model generalizes better when training data is not abundant? – Carl Thomé Jan 16 '17 at 13:41

This thread is misleading. Tried commenting on Lucas Ramadan's answer, but I don't have the right privileges yet, so I'll just put this here.

Batch normalization works best after the activation function, and here or here is why: it was developed to prevent internal covariate shift. Internal covariate shift occurs when the distribution of the activations of a layer shifts significantly throughout training. Batch normalization is used so that the distribution of the inputs (and these inputs are literally the result of an activation function) to a specific layer doesn't change over time due to parameter updates from each batch (or at least, allows it to change in an advantageous way). It uses batch statistics to do the normalizing, and then uses the batch normalization parameters (gamma and beta in the original paper) "to make sure that the transformation inserted in the network can represent the identity transform" (quote from original paper). But the point is that we're trying to normalize the inputs to a layer, so it should always go immediately before the next layer in the network. Whether or not that's after an activation function is dependent on the architecture in question.

  • 11
    I just saw in the deeplearning.ai class that Andrew Ng says that there is a debate on this in the Deep Learning community. He prefers applying batch normalization before the non-linearity. – shahensha Nov 1 '17 at 5:24
  • 1
    could you please add more information @shahensha – kRazzy R Feb 5 at 4:21
  • 1
    @kRazzyR I meant that Prof. Andrew Ng talked about this topic in his deep learning classes on deeplearning.ai He said that the community is divided on the right way of doing things and that he preferred applying batch normalization before applying the non-linearity. – shahensha Apr 2 at 20:48

This thread has some considerable debate about whether BN should be applied before non-linearity of current layer or to the activations of the previous layer.

Although there is no correct answer, the authors of Batch Normalization say that It should be applied immediately before the non-linearity of the current layer. The reason ( quoted from original paper) -

"We add the BN transform immediately before the nonlinearity, by normalizing x = Wu+b. We could have also normalized the layer inputs u, but since u is likely the output of another nonlinearity, the shape of its distribution is likely to change during training, and constraining its first and second moments would not eliminate the covariate shift. In contrast, Wu + b is more likely to have a symmetric, non-sparse distribution, that is “more Gaussian” (Hyv¨arinen & Oja, 2000); normalizing it is likely to produce activations with a stable distribution."

  • 1
    In my own personal experience, it doesn't make a huge difference, but all else being equal, I've always seen BN perform slightly better when batch normalization is applied before the non-linearity (before the activation function). – Brad Hesse Oct 2 '17 at 19:24

It's almost become a trend now to have a Conv2D followed by a ReLu followed by a BatchNormalization layer. So I made up a small function to call all of them at once. Makes the model definition look a whole lot cleaner and easier to read.

def Conv2DReluBatchNorm(n_filter, w_filter, h_filter, inputs):
    return BatchNormalization()(Activation(activation='relu')(Convolution2D(n_filter, w_filter, h_filter, border_mode='same')(inputs)))
  • 5
    maybe push this to keras? – Sachin_ruk Mar 22 '17 at 23:06

Keras now supports the use_bias=False option, so we can save some computation by writing like

model.add(Dense(64, use_bias=False))
model.add(BatchNormalization(axis=bn_axis))
model.add(Activation('tanh'))

or

model.add(Convolution2D(64, 3, 3, use_bias=False))
model.add(BatchNormalization(axis=bn_axis))
model.add(Activation('relu'))
  • hows model.add(BatchNormalization()) different from model.add(BatchNormalization(axis=bn_axis)) – kRazzy R Feb 20 at 18:58
  • @kRazzR it doesn't differ if you are using tensorflow as backend. It's written here because he copied this from the keras.applications module, where bn_axis needs to be specified in order to support both channels_first and channels_last formats. – ldavid Apr 3 at 12:22
  • Can someone please elaborate how this relates to the OP question? (I am rather beginner to NNs so maybe I miss something.) – Pepacz Apr 15 at 16:57

It is another type of layer, so you should add it as a layer in an appropriate place of your model

model.add(keras.layers.normalization.BatchNormalization())

See an example here: https://github.com/fchollet/keras/blob/master/examples/kaggle_otto_nn.py

  • After I added BatchNormalization, the val_acc stopped increasing every epoch. The val_acc stayed stagnant at the same number after every epoch after I added BatchNormalization. I thought Batch Normalization was supposed to increase the val_acc. How do I know if it is working properly? Do you know what may have caused this? – pr338 Jan 14 '16 at 6:12
  • unfortunately the link is no longer valid :( – user2324712 May 21 '16 at 13:58
  • There are copies of that example in forks of Keras (e.g. github.com/WenchenLi/kaggle/blob/master/otto/keras/…), but I don't know why it was removed from the original Keras repo, and if the code is compatible with latest Keras versions. – Pavel Surmenok Sep 23 '16 at 16:15

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