I've tried git branch -r, but that only lists remote branches that I've tracked locally. How do I find the list of those that I haven't? (It doesn't matter to me whether the command lists all remote branches or only those that are untracked.)

  • 9
    You mean you've modified the default refspec, so that git fetch and git remote update don't fetch all the remote's branches? Because otherwise you could just fetch then use git branch -r... – Cascabel Aug 12 '10 at 23:40
  • 2
    I must have. git branch -r was only showing me remote branches that I had tracked locally. It's working better now. – James A. Rosen Aug 13 '10 at 0:02

15 Answers 15

up vote 570 down vote accepted

For the vast majority[1] of visitors here, the correct and simplest answer to the question "How do I list all remote branches in Git 1.7+?" is:

git branch -r

For a small minority[1] git branch -r does not work. If git branch -r does not work try:

git ls-remote --heads <remote-name>

If git branch -r does not work, then maybe as Cascabel says "you've modified the default refspec, so that git fetch and git remote update don't fetch all the remote's branches".


[1] As of the writing of this footnote 2018-Feb, I looked at the comments and see that the git branch -r works for the vast majority (about 90% or 125 out of 140).

If git branch -r does not work, check git config --get remote.origin.fetch contains a wildcard (*) as per this answer

  • 11
    You can also do git ls-remote [url] so you don't have to clone it first :) – Zsub Oct 14 '13 at 15:33
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    This answer is correct but misleading, the first thing users coming here from search engines should see is: git branch -r since that is the correct and simplest answer, the asker had a special case where he modified the behavior of his git branch -r that most users coming here won't have – Stephan Aug 12 '14 at 0:17
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    @Stephan: are you sure about this? git branch -ralso did not work for me. It's just listing the branches already tracked locally. But git ls-remote --heads listed all branches available on the remote repository ... – rexford Oct 17 '14 at 8:58
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    If one wants to fetch from the branches listed via git ls-remote (and not listed at git branch -r), one has to execute git config remote.origin.fetch "+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*" before fetching as described at stackoverflow.com/a/26649770/873282. – koppor Feb 14 '16 at 13:02
  • 4
    Don't forget to do git fetch --all before to get all the current remote branches. – A. Attia May 4 at 12:22

remote show shows all the branches on the remote, including those that are not tracked locally and even those that have not yet been fetched.

git remote show <remote-name>

It also tries to show the status of the branches relative to your local repo:

> git remote show origin
* remote origin
  Fetch URL: C:/git/.\remote_repo.git
  Push  URL: C:/git/.\remote_repo.git
  HEAD branch: master
  Remote branches:
    branch_that_is_not_even_fetched new (next fetch will store in remotes/origin)
    branch_that_is_not_tracked      tracked
    branch_that_is_tracked          tracked
    master                          tracked
  Local branches configured for 'git pull':
    branch_that_is_tracked merges with remote branch_that_is_tracked
    master                 merges with remote master
  Local refs configured for 'git push':
    branch_that_is_tracked pushes to branch_that_is_tracked (fast-forwardable)
    master                 pushes to master                 (up to date)
  • Exactly. Not fetched, not tracked locally. – Thufir Feb 15 '15 at 11:32
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    branch_that_is_not_tracked tracked ? – Piotr Dobrogost Oct 11 '15 at 15:48
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    @PiotrDobrogost Yes! branch_that_is_not_tracked is a branch that is not tracked by any local git branch. However, it has been fetched to the local repository (so there is a remote branch). For some strange reason git remote show calls this state tracked, even though there is no local branch that tracks the remote. In this case, the opposite of tracked is new, meaning "not fetched". – Klas Mellbourn Oct 11 '15 at 19:17
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    git remote show origin is what one needs, thanks! – Amit Dash May 5 '17 at 4:15
  • this doesnt work programmatically, too difficult to parse – Alexander Mills Aug 5 at 16:53
git branch -a | grep remotes/*
  • 10
    This is basically equivalent to git branch -r, which the OP said wasn't good enough. – Cascabel Aug 12 '10 at 23:10
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    actually both git branch -a and git branch -r list all remote branches for me, I'm not sure if what the OP said is true. I just setup a test repository and verified this (only had master tracking origin/master but still saw all remote branches with both flags). – Idan K Aug 13 '10 at 11:01
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    seems this doesn't list all remote branches if I clone from an existing pulled repo and then manually point origin at the git server. The accepted answer handles this case. – nielsbot Oct 17 '13 at 0:59
  • @nielsbot: Thanks, this resolved it for me! – rexford Oct 17 '14 at 9:16
  • This solution doesn't seem to list remote branches created since I last fetched. – Anubian Noob Jul 6 '15 at 13:56

Using git branch -r lists all remote branches and git branch -a lists all branches on local and remote. These lists get outdated though. To keep these lists up-to-date, run

git remote update --prune

which will update your local branch list with all new ones from the remote and remove any that are no longer there. Running this update command without the --prune will retrieve new branches but not delete ones no longer on the remote.

You can speed up this update by specifying a remote, otherwise it will pull updates from all remotes you have added, like so

git remote update --prune origin
  • 1
    You have a little mistake in command git remote update -–prune — wrong dash character. The correct option is --prune. – Vladimir Korshunov Feb 15 '17 at 15:20
  • This fixed my problem - 'git branch -r' now works for me. – Francis Norton May 4 at 14:21

But

git branch -ar

should do it.

  • 35
    Passing in both arguments is redundant. -r returns only remote branches. -a returns both local and remote branches. Thus, git branch -a and git branch -ar both yield the same output. – Walter Roman Jan 4 '14 at 0:12

You also may do git fetch followed by a git branch -r. Without fetch you will not see the most current branches.

  • git fetch --all to have all current branches – A. Attia May 4 at 12:21

Git Branching - Remote Branches

git ls-remote

Git documentation.

  • git ls-remote --heads to get more specific results – Wolfgang Fahl Aug 20 at 9:26

The simplest way I found:

git branch -a

The best command to run is git remote show [remote]. This will show all branches, remote and local, tracked and untracked.

Here's an example from an open source project:

> git remote show origin
* remote origin
  Fetch URL: https://github.com/OneBusAway/onebusaway-android
  Push  URL: https://github.com/OneBusAway/onebusaway-android
  HEAD branch: master
  Remote branches:
    amazon-rc2                   new (next fetch will store in remotes/origin)
    amazon-rc3                   new (next fetch will store in remotes/origin)
    arrivalStyleBDefault         new (next fetch will store in remotes/origin)
    develop                      tracked
    master                       tracked
    refs/remotes/origin/branding stale (use 'git remote prune' to remove)
  Local branches configured for 'git pull':
    develop merges with remote develop
    master  merges with remote master
  Local refs configured for 'git push':
    develop pushes to develop (local out of date)
    master  pushes to master  (up to date)

If we just want to get the remote branches, we can use grep. The command we'd want to use would be:

grep "\w*\s*(new|tracked)" -E

With this command:

> git remote show origin | grep "\w*\s*(new|tracked)" -E
    amazon-rc2                   new (next fetch will store in remotes/origin)
    amazon-rc3                   new (next fetch will store in remotes/origin)
    arrivalStyleBDefault         new (next fetch will store in remotes/origin)
    develop                      tracked
    master                       tracked

You can also create an alias for this:

git config --global alias.branches "!git remote show origin | grep \w*\s*(new|tracked) -E"

Then you can just run git branches.

TL;TR;

This is the solution of your problem:

git remote update --prune    # To update all remotes
git branch -r                # To display remote branches

or:

git remote update --prune    # To update all remotes
git branch <TAB>             # To display all branches

With GitBash, you Can use:

git branch -a

I ended up doing a mess shell pipeline to get what I wanted, just merged branches from the origin remote:

git branch -r --all --merged \
    | tail -n +2 \
    | grep -P '^  remotes/origin/(?!HEAD)' \
    | perl -p -e 's/^  remotes\/origin\///g;s/master\n//g'

Using this Command,

git log -r --oneline --no-merges --simplify-by-decoration --pretty=format:"%n %Cred CommitID %Creset: %h %n %Cred Remote Branch %Creset :%d %n %Cred Commit Message %Creset: %s %n"


CommitID       : 27385d919 
Remote Branch  : (origin/ALPHA) 
Commit Message :  New branch created

List all remote branches including commit messages,commit Id that are referred by remote branches.

Make sure that the remote origin you are listing is really the repository that you want and not an older clone.

try

 git branch -at
  • 9
    The -t option affects behavior when creating branches. Nothing to do with this. – Cascabel Aug 12 '10 at 23:11

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