4

For example in Yii2 framework The yii\filters\AccessControl class overrides an init() function from its parent class yii\base\Object. This Object class in turn has a constructor method like this:

    Class Object implements Configurable {
        public function __construct($config = [])
        {
            if (!empty($config)) {
                Yii::configure($this, $config);
        }
        $this->init(); // calls the method defined below
        }
    }
// and the definition of this init function ... 
    public function init()
    {
    }

Now there is no apparent use of writing such an empty function unless one wants to use for initializing some properties he/she may need in future.

But then the __construct() method has exactly the same use ! I need to understand how this init() method is helpful.

5

The reason is simple: they're expecting you to extend the class

So you'd do something like this

class Bob extends Object {
    public function init() {
        $this->setup_something();
    }
}

So because Bob extends Object the method from Bob is the one that gets called. If you don't need to initialize something just skip the defintion and the base class will call the empty method.

This keeps you from having to do something potentially messier: overwrite the constructor

class Bob extends Object {
    public function __construct($config = []) {
         $this->setup_something();
    }
}

Now, this is messy because there's something critical a LOT of people miss (and I intentionally left out for this example): the parent constructor will not be called (you could do that by having parent::__construct($config)). So by having a separate init() you avoid having that mess entirely. There's an explicit method to do your own setup.

3

It has been discussed at length on the Yii forums. Here's the Yii project lead:

One of the reasons for init() is about life cycles of an object (or a component to be exact).

With an init() method, it is possible to configure an object after it is instantiated while before fully initialized. For example, an application component could be configured using app config. If you override its init() method, you will be sure that the configuration is applied and you can safely to check if everything is ready. Similar thing happens to a widget and other configurable components.

Even if init() is called within constructor rather than by another object, it has meaning. For example, in CApplication, there are preInit() and init(). They set up the life cycles of an application and may be overridden so that the customization only occurs at expected life cycles.

I agree with you that the method naming is very important. Here in Yii, init() method means that an object is already fully configured and some additional initialization work should be done in this method.

and:

Every function should exist for a reason. In the Yii case, the init() method is mainly offered to allow customization at certain life cycle of a component. In your calendar application, you may or may not need init(). If you intend to release it for public use, I would suggest you be more conservative at allowing customization. That is, do not define init() unless you have strong reason for it. Once you provide a protected or public method, it means you need to maintain it in future releases.

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