8

(Or a list of lists... I just edited)

Is there an existing python/pandas method for converting a structure like this

food2 = {}
food2["apple"]   = ["fruit", "round"]
food2["bananna"] = ["fruit", "yellow", "long"]
food2["carrot"]  = ["veg", "orange", "long"]
food2["raddish"] = ["veg", "red"]

into a pivot table like this?

+---------+-------+-----+-------+------+--------+--------+-----+
|         | fruit | veg | round | long | yellow | orange | red |
+---------+-------+-----+-------+------+--------+--------+-----+
| apple   | 1     |     | 1     |      |        |        |     |
+---------+-------+-----+-------+------+--------+--------+-----+
| bananna | 1     |     |       | 1    | 1      |        |     |
+---------+-------+-----+-------+------+--------+--------+-----+
| carrot  |       | 1   |       | 1    |        | 1      |     |
+---------+-------+-----+-------+------+--------+--------+-----+
| raddish |       | 1   |       |      |        |        | 1   |
+---------+-------+-----+-------+------+--------+--------+-----+

Naively, I would probably just loop through the dictionary. I see how I can use a map on each inner list, but I don't know how to join/stack them over the dictionary. Once I did join them, I could just use pandas.pivot_table

for key in food2:
    attrlist = food2[key]
    onefruit_pairs = map(lambda x: [key, x], attrlist)
    one_fruit_frame = pd.DataFrame(onefruit_pairs, columns=['fruit', 'attr'])
    print(one_fruit_frame)

     fruit    attr
0  bananna   fruit
1  bananna  yellow
2  bananna    long
    fruit    attr
0  carrot     veg
1  carrot  orange
2  carrot    long
   fruit   attr
0  apple  fruit
1  apple  round
     fruit attr
0  raddish  veg
1  raddish  red

2 Answers 2

3

An answer using pandas.

# Test data
food2 = {}
food2["apple"]   = ["fruit", "round"]
food2["bananna"] = ["fruit", "yellow", "long"]
food2["carrot"]  = ["veg", "orange", "long"]
food2["raddish"] = ["veg", "red"]

df = DataFrame(dict([ (k,Series(v)) for k,v in food2.items() ]))
# pivoting to long format
df = pd.melt(df, var_name='item', value_name='categ')
# cross-tabulation
df = pd.crosstab(df['item'], df['categ'])
# sorting index, maybe not necessary    
df.sort_index(inplace=True)
df

# categ    fruit  long  orange  red  round  veg  yellow
# item                                                 
# apple        1     0       0    0      1    0       0
# bananna      1     1       0    0      0    0       1
# carrot       0     1       1    0      0    1       0
# raddish      0     0       0    1      0    1       0
1
  • Tested with the same imput from the other answer. Oddly enough, performance is not that far for that input ( 279936 rows by 1000 columns, very sparse). Jan 12, 2016 at 0:03
2

Pure python:

from itertools import chain

def count(d):
    cols = set(chain(*d.values()))
    yield ['name'] + list(cols)
    for row, values in d.items():
        yield [row] + [(col in values) for col in cols]

Testing:

>>> food2 = {           
    "apple": ["fruit", "round"],
    "bananna": ["fruit", "yellow", "long"],
    "carrot": ["veg", "orange", "long"],
    "raddish": ["veg", "red"]
}

>>> list(count(food2))
[['name', 'long', 'veg', 'fruit', 'yellow', 'orange', 'round', 'red'],
 ['bananna', True, False, True, True, False, False, False],
 ['carrot', True, True, False, False, True, False, False],
 ['apple', False, False, True, False, False, True, False],
 ['raddish', False, True, False, False, False, False, True]]

[update]

Performance test:

>>> from itertools import product
>>> labels = list("".join(_) for _ in product(*(["ABCDEF"] * 7)))
>>> attrs = labels[:1000]
>>> import random
>>> sample = {}
>>> for k in labels:
...     sample[k] = random.sample(attrs, 5)
>>> import time
>>> n = time.time(); list(count(sample)); print time.time() - n                                                                
62.0367980003

It took less than 2 minutes, for 279936 rows by 1000 columns on my busy machine (lots of chrome tabs open). Let me know if the performance is unacceptable.

[update]

Testing the performance from the other answer:

>>> n = time.time(); \
...     df = pd.DataFrame(dict([(k, pd.Series(v)) for k,v in sample.items()])); \
...     print time.time() - n
72.0512290001

The next line (df = pd.melt(...)) was taking too long so I canceled the test. Take this result with a grain of salt because it was running on a busy machine.

4
  • Excellent. Do you have any intuition on how this would perform (compared to some yet unspecified Pandas magic) on hundreds of thousands of "fruit" and thousands of attributes? Jan 11, 2016 at 18:26
  • I "had" to import itertools Jan 11, 2016 at 18:37
  • 1
    This solution is optimized for simplicity instead of performance. There is plenty of room for improvement, specially if you know the attributes in advance. Updated with the missing "import". Jan 11, 2016 at 18:42
  • Would you be kind enough to compare the answers regarding the performance when applied to your data? Jan 12, 2016 at 0:32

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