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I'm writing some code in C++ that needs to call a library written in C99. This library uses C99-style array declarations with the static keyword in its function parameters. I.e., as such:

void my_func(int n, int my_ints[static n]);

However, when including the headers of this library in my C++ project, the compiler (clang) throws an warning when using the -pedantic flag:

> g++ -pedantic -c my_code.cpp
In file included from my_code.cpp:
./my_c_lib.h: warning: variable length arrays are a C99 feature [-Wvla-extension]
void my_func(int n, int my_ints[static n]);

What is the correct/best way to call the C library in this case? Besides turning off the vla-extension warning, is there some way around it that does not involve rewriting the library's headers or writing an intermediate C wrapper?

Minimal working example:

extern "C" {
    void my_func(int n, int my_ints[static n]);
}

int main()
{
    int* some_ints = new int[10];
    my_func(10, some_ints);
    delete[] some_ints;
    return 0;
}
3
  • Do you need to compile using the -pedantic flag? It is like it flag states it is designed to force you to adhere to pedantic ANSI standards, which is more strict then just the -ANSI flag, which is already fairly strict. By using a C99 feature you aren't coding to pedantic standards.
    – Joe Tyman
    Jan 11, 2016 at 20:52
  • @JoeTyman I'm using the pedantic flag as a way to ensure portability, but it might be over the top. VLA is obviously a C99 feature, and g++ correctly warns for it -- hence my question. The library itself is compiled using gcc -c -std=c99 -pedantic in which case VLAs should be fine, right? Jan 11, 2016 at 21:13
  • You should(this is me not knowing about what platforms you are actually programming for) be fine with a standard that turned 16 last month and was replaced four years ago. If you are really worried about portability to that extreme you would have to replace your C99 VLAs with the standard ones.
    – Joe Tyman
    Jan 11, 2016 at 21:30

2 Answers 2

4

The truth is that C++ simply does not have VLAs that are nearly as powerful as the C99 ones, and it will likely never do; the advances that are being made to include VLAs into the language are so heavily restricted that they are pretty much useless.

That said, your best bet is likely to write some wrappers for the library functions that you actually use, which expose interfaces of the style

void my_func_wrap(int n, int* my_ints);

These would be implemented in a C99 file like so:

void my_func_wrap(int n, int* my_ints) {
    my_func(n, my_ints);
}

Both the C header and the file with the implementations can be auto-generated from your library headers as the change is next to trivial. Now you can call the wrappers from your C++ code without any type conflict.


A second possible approach would be to write script that strips the contents of all [] brackets from the library headers, and use that instead. This would work perfectly, because even in C99 the declaration

void my_func_wrap(int n, int my_ints[static n]);

decays into

void my_func_wrap(int n, int* my_ints);

This is the reason why I didn't need any cast in the wrapper function above (I know this sounds insane, but it's the truth). It's just your C++ compiler that does not like the first syntax variant.

4
  • Exactly, it's only syntax difference really. Semantically they are the same. Even if C++ would not have VLA, it would seem unproblematic to decay VLA declarations in function signatures to pointers as it's done in C. Jan 11, 2016 at 21:21
  • 1
    "C++ simply does not have VLAs that are nearly as powerful as the C99 ones" Or, indeed, at all. Jan 11, 2016 at 21:44
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Afaik C++ will have some notion of VLA's in C++17, albeit in a very restricted sense. That is why I left my wording a bit open, even though I could indeed have used stronger words for C++11. The point is that C++ does not seem likely to adopt any useful VLA implementation within the next twenty years or so. Jan 12, 2016 at 6:18
  • @cmaster: Fortunately :) Jan 12, 2016 at 8:14
0

is there some way around it that does not involve rewriting the library's headers or writing an intermediate C wrapper?

Sure, you can just enclose the whole c header within the extern statement:

extern "C" {
    #include "my_c_lib.h"
}
3
  • Thanks. However, I think you might have misunderstood me. If you look at the minimal example, moving the function signature to a separate header and including it (which, I guess, would be in line with your suggestion) does not remove the warning. Jan 11, 2016 at 20:39
  • @FredrikSavje Hmm, I've overlooked that. I'm not sure if GCC gets away with two -std= options for c and c++ at the same time. VLAs are a supported extension of GCC (as well for c++), so if you sure what you're doing works correctly just ignore the warning. Jan 11, 2016 at 20:43
  • This does not magically switch to C language, and it certainly doesn't magically turn on VLAs!! Jan 11, 2016 at 21:44

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