4

I am very new to swift. And I met this problem quite by accident.

This is an example in The Swift Programming Language(Swift 2.1).

let individualScores = [75, 43, 103, 87, 12]
var teamScore = 0
for score in individualScores {
    if score > 50 {
        teamScore += 3
    } else {
        teamScore += 1
    }
}
print(teamScore)

As can be seen, score is a variable in the code section above. But it's apparently not declared before using it. I mean, there is no syntax like this:

var score: Int

or

var score = 0

I just want to know why, or how to do that, using a variable without declaring its type with var syntax.

As the grammar in C++ (Swift is, in some way, similar with C++), it should be "can't be recognized" if the variable has not been declared.

Thanks in advance.

  • it only exists inside the loop – Leo Dabus Jan 12 '16 at 2:08
  • In only exists within the loop. Its type is inferred to be the element type of the object that you enumerate over (Int since individualScores is an [Int]). The variable can't be assigned to. – zneak Jan 12 '16 at 2:13
5

score is assigned by the for loop. Its type is inferred as whatever the element of individualScores is. Since individualScores is an Array of Int, or [Int], score must be an Int. Therefore, you don't need to formally declare its type in this case.

There's similar behavior with closures, where you can name variables without formally declaring them with let or var. For example:

let individualScores = [75, 43, 103, 87, 12]
var teamScore = 0

individualScores.forEach {
    score in
    if score > 50 {
        teamScore += 3
    } else {
        teamScore += 1
    }
}

print(teamScore)
  • Thank you! As I continued learning it, I find this phenomenon is quite often. Variables used only in for loop always use this informal declaration, and they will be meaningless outside the for loop, right? – JW.ZG Jan 12 '16 at 2:40
  • Yes, only meaningful inside the for loop, just like i in: for(int i=0; i < something; i++){.... – Nicolas Miari Jan 12 '16 at 2:42

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