Using this article as a guide I was able to successfully replicate MySQL's aes-128-ecb in PHP:

final class Encryption
{

  // The key
  const KEY = '36F3D40A7A41A827968BE75A87D60950';

  /**
   * Encrypt a string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function encrypt($string)
  {
    return mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128, self::getMySQLKey(self::KEY), self::getPaddedString($string), MCRYPT_MODE_ECB);
  }

  /**
   * Decrypt a string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function decrypt($string)
  {
    return rtrim(mcrypt_decrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128, self::getMySQLKey(self::KEY), $string, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB), "\x00..\x10");
  }

  /**
   * Get MySQL key
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $key
   * @return string
   */
  public static function getMySQLKey($key)
  {

    // The new key
    $new_key = str_repeat(chr(0), 16);

    // Iterate over the key and XOR
    for ($i = 0, $l = strlen($key); $i < $l; ++$i)
    {
      $new_key[$i % 16] = $new_key[$i % 16] ^ $key[$i];
    }

    // Return the new key
    return $new_key;

  }

  /**
   * Get padded string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function getPaddedString($string)
  {
    return str_pad($string, (16 * (floor(strlen($string) / 16) + 1)), chr(16 - (strlen($string) % 16)));
  }

}

As an example:

// PHP, gives CJI+zJyviQI7GgSCLGMNsqsXq2MDKC3a9FIG3wDrE8Y=
base64_encode(Encryption::encrypt('michael@example.com'))

// MySQL, gives CJI+zJyviQI7GgSCLGMNsqsXq2MDKC3a9FIG3wDrE8Y=
SELECT TO_BASE64(AES_ENCRYPT('michael@example.com', '36F3D40A7A41A827968BE75A87D60950'));

However, I want to update to using aes-256-cbc but am having difficulties. I started by replacing MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128 with MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256 and MCRYPT_MODE_ECB with MCRYPT_MODE_CBC and used the KEY constant as the initialization vector:

  /**
   * Encrypt a string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function encrypt($string)
  {
    return mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, self::getMySQLKey(self::KEY), self::getPaddedString($string), MCRYPT_MODE_CBC, self::KEY);
  }

  /**
   * Decrypt a string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function decrypt($string)
  {
    return rtrim(mcrypt_decrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, self::getMySQLKey(self::KEY), $string, MCRYPT_MODE_CBC, self::KEY), "\x00..\x10");
  }

The problem is that I'm now getting different values from PHP and MySQL:

// PHP, gives XSRfnrl05CE7JIHCvfhq6D67O0mAW2ayrFv2YkjFVYI=
base64_encode(Encryption::encrypt('michael@example.com'))

// MySQL, gives lTLT4MRXcHnOAsYjlwUX4WVPHgYvyi6nKC4/3us/VF4=
SELECT TO_BASE64(AES_ENCRYPT('michael@example.com', '36F3D40A7A41A827968BE75A87D60950', '36F3D40A7A41A827968BE75A87D60950'));

I'm unsure where to proceed from here so any help would be appreciated.

And just to confirm that MySQL is indeed using the correct encryption method:

// aes-256-cbc
SELECT @@session.block_encryption_mode
  • 2
    You've gone from a key length of 128 bits (16 bytes) to 256 bits (32 bytes) but have retained the constant 16 in your code. – eggyal Jan 12 '16 at 12:26
  • Sorry, which bit are you referring to? The KEY constant? I doubled it up (but used the first 32 for the IV), but that hasn't helped. – MichaelRushton Jan 12 '16 at 12:41
  • 1
    No, I'm referring to the three times that the number 16 appears in your getMySQLKey function. – eggyal Jan 12 '16 at 12:46
  • Changing that gives gQc6iL6rdagUsUtMRs+rSZO/00LnakwGS5LcjUugdyU= which is still different to what MySQL gives. – MichaelRushton Jan 12 '16 at 12:48
  • 2
    AES-256 is still MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128 and not MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256. AES and Rijndael are not synonymous. AES-256 is selected by providing a 32 byte key to MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128. – Artjom B. Jan 12 '16 at 14:13

AES is a subset of Rijndael so to use it for AES one must select a block size of 128-bits and a key size of 128, 192 or 256 bits.

MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256 specifies a block size of 256-bits, not the key size, similarly MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128 specifies a block size of 128-bits, not the key size. This is a common confusion.

This implementation of Rijndael auto selects a key size based on the passed key so it is important to use a key of exactly the correct desired size.

Also note that the iv length is the same as the block size so for AES it is 128-bits in length.

This is a good example of how poor naming can have unfortunate consequences.

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As neither eggyal nor Artjom B. have chosen to provide an answer with their solution, I'll do so on their behalf.

The first issue is that AES-256 still uses MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128 rather than MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, and the second is that AES-256 is used over AES-128 by providing a 32 byte key rather than a 16 byte key.

The below provides a correct implementation:

final class AESEncrypter
{

  // The key
  const KEY = 'F40E2A9E22150793C6D0CA9E316FEA42';

  // The IV
  const IV = '5C354934224F698E';

  /**
   * Encrypt a string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function encrypt($string)
  {
    return mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128, self::getMySQLKey(self::KEY), self::getPaddedString($string), MCRYPT_MODE_CBC, self::IV);
  }

  /**
   * Decrypt a string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function decrypt($string)
  {
    return rtrim(mcrypt_decrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_128, self::getMySQLKey(self::KEY), $string, MCRYPT_MODE_CBC, self::IV), "\x00..\x10");
  }

  /**
   * Get MySQL key
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $key
   * @return string
   */
  public static function getMySQLKey($key)
  {

    // The new key
    $new_key = str_repeat(chr(0), 32);

    // Iterate over the key and XOR
    for ($i = 0, $l = strlen($key); $i < $l; ++$i)
    {
        $new_key[$i % 32] = $new_key[$i % 32] ^ $key[$i];
    }

    // Return the new key
    return $new_key;

  }

  /**
   * Get padded string
   *
   * @access public
   * @static
   * @param string $string
   * @return string
   */
  public static function getPaddedString($string)
  {
    return str_pad($string, (16 * (floor(strlen($string) / 16) + 1)), chr(16 - (strlen($string) % 16)));
  }

}

As an example:

// PHP, gives mwVraDh/7jG3BvPJyYqgxY6Ca8CTRN5JHvwPGeV8Vd0=
base64_encode(AESEncrypter::encrypt('michael@example.com'))

// MySQL, gives mwVraDh/7jG3BvPJyYqgxY6Ca8CTRN5JHvwPGeV8Vd0=
SELECT TO_BASE64(AES_ENCRYPT('michael@example.com', 'F40E2A9E22150793C6D0CA9E316FEA42', '5C354934224F698E'))

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