6

I would like to use one of my GPS (2) subkeys for signing commits/tags in Git I.e., my freshly created RSA4096 signing-only key with the long ID B0##...

sec#  ed25519/9F############## 2016-01-07 [expires: 2023-01-05]
  Key fingerprint = FC08 HEX HEX HEX 
uid                 [ultimate] MY NAME <MY.NAME@foo bar>
ssb   rsa4096/C9############## 2016-01-07 [expires: 2022-01-05]
ssb   ed25519/C6############## 2016-01-07 [expires: 2022-01-05]
ssb   rsa4096/B0############## 2016-01-13 [expires: 2022-01-11]

Where I am working on a keyring with the master key removed (backuped away) as 'better key policy'

So, I tried to set up the signing key for Git

[user]
    ...
    signingkey = B0##############

However, committing & signing fails with

> git commit -S  -m "test commit"
gpg: skipped "B0##############": secret key not available
gpg: signing failed: secret key not available
error: gpg failed to sign the data
fatal: failed to write commit object

Where a gpg-agent up and running.

My first guess was, that Git does not understand the long key notation and tried the short one instead

> gpg2 --list-secret-keys  --keyid-format short
...
ssb   rsa4096/DB###### 2016-01-13 [expires: 2022-01-11]

> ~/.gitconfig
[user]
   ...
   signingkey = DB######

But which also failed

> git commit -S  -m "test commit short"
gpg: skipped "DB######": secret key not available
gpg: signing failed: secret key not available
error: gpg failed to sign the data
fatal: failed to write commit object

So, I wonder what breaks here and if maybe Git only would work with a master key for signing but does not understand the use of subkeys (or if I have screwed up myself somewhere)?

  • 2
    Try setting gpg2 as gpg.program. Since you use gpg2 for running GnuPG 2.0, gpg will be GnuPG 1 without any support for elliptic curves. Be aware that currently, a vast majority will not be able to handle your signatures, as your primary key is an elliptic curve key. – Jens Erat Jan 13 '16 at 12:30
  • Yeay! That did the trick! I am aware, that EC25519 ist not very standard conform (yet) - it was a bit of an exercise to use it but maybe was not the best decision on the short-term ;) – THX Jan 13 '16 at 13:07
15

Git uses gpg by default, which is GnuPG 1 on most systems and does not support elliptic curve cryptography. As your primary key is an elliptic curve key, GnuPG 1 cannot use the key at all. You will be able to observe the same when trying to use the key with GnuPG (gpg --default-key key-id --sign).

Configure Git to use gpg2 instead, which is required to be at least GnuPG 2.1 (which you have, as you can use the elliptic curves key):

git config --global gpg.program gpg2
  • Solved my gpg error in git. Thanks! – Suriyaa Apr 8 '16 at 14:31
  • Thanks. Using gpg2 also solved my issue with RSA keys. git was refusing to commit because the master private key wasn't present. – berbt Aug 1 '16 at 8:29
  • This is an issue when using GnuPG 2.1 or newer, which moved private keys into the public keyring. GnuPG prior (1.4, 2.0) will not find it there. – Jens Erat Aug 1 '16 at 8:34

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