4

Can I do this with streams?

StringBuilder text = new StringBuilder();
StringBuilder dupText = new StringBuilder();
String lastLetter = "";

for (Container cont : containersList) {
    String letter = cont.getLetter();
    text.append(letter);
    if (letter.equals(lastLetter) == false) {
        dupText.append(letter);
    }
    lastLetter = letter;
}

System.out.println(text);
System.out.println(dupText);

I go over list of continers, each one has a char. I need to assemble two strings - one is all the chars combine, and the other one is all the chars but without coupled duplicates (ABABAAAB -> ABABAB)

Can this be done with streams?

I tried doing it like this:

Optional<String> text = containersList.stream()
            .map(Container::getLetter)
            .reduce((letter,accumalator) -> accumalator += letter);

Optional<String> dupText = session.containersList().stream()
            .map(Container::getLetter)
            .reduce((letter, accumalator) ->{
                if ((accumalator.endsWith(letter) == false)) {
                    accumalator += letter;
                }
                return accumalator;
            });
  • 4
    Don’t write statements like if(condition == false). The canonical negation of a boolean is to use logical not, aka the ! operator: if(!condition), just like you would write if(condition) rather than if(condition==true), wouldn’t you… wouldn’t you? – Holger Jan 13 '16 at 15:25
  • Its an issue of standards.. At my company we do write ==true. – Ido Barash Jan 13 '16 at 16:11
  • 2
    Why? And shouldn’t you write (condition==true)==true to be consistent? After all, condition==true is a kind of condition. Oh wait…(condition==true)==true is also a condition… Are you allowed to write a!=b or do you have to write (a==b)==false? – Holger Jan 13 '16 at 16:15
  • 2
    Always using curly braces is a coding style which has a reasonable point. It can prevent certain kinds of errors. In contrast, using ==true on a boolean expression is denying the fact that there is a boolean type in Java that already prevents mixing of values and conditionals. There is no problem that adding a ==true can solve. – Holger Jan 13 '16 at 16:28
  • 2
    Even though this is a digression from the question, I happen to agree with Holger on this. Comparing a boolean to true or false is bad style. Too bad your company's coding standard says to do that. Whoever wrote that should be taken out and ... chastised firmly. – Stuart Marks Jan 13 '16 at 21:17
5

Using StreamEx library

You can do this in a single Stream pipeline using the StreamEx library.

List<Container> containersList = Arrays.asList(new Container("A"), new Container("B"), new Container("A"), new Container("A"), new Container("B"));

String[] result =
        StreamEx.of(containersList)
                .map(Container::getLetter)
                .groupRuns(Object::equals)
                .collect(MoreCollectors.pairing(
                    MoreCollectors.flatMapping(List::stream, Collectors.joining()),
                    MoreCollectors.mapping(l -> l.get(0), Collectors.joining()),
                    (s1, s2) -> new String[] { s1, s2 }
                ));

System.out.println(result[0]);
System.out.println(result[1]);

This code creates a Stream of the containers and maps each of those to their letter.

Then, the method groupRuns collapses into a List the successive elements that matches the given predicate. In this case, the predicate is the equality of the String: so if you start with the stream [A, A, B], this method will collapse it into the Stream [List(A, A), List(B)] (the first element is the list of 2 A successive elements in the input).

Finally, this is collected with the pairing collector that allows to collect into two different collector. The first one joins the flat map result of each list while the second one joins only the first element of the list (hence removing the successive elements).

The result is stored inside an array which just serves as a holder for two values.

Output:

ABAAB
ABAB

Using the Stream API directly

If you want to stay with the current API and not using a library, your best bet would be to write a custom Collector:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Container> containersList = Arrays.asList(new Container("A"), new Container("B"), new Container("A"), new Container("A"), new Container("B"));

    String[] result = containersList.stream().parallel().map(Container::getLetter).collect(ContainerCollector.collector());

    System.out.println(result[0]);
    System.out.println(result[1]);
}

private static final class ContainerCollector {

    private StringBuilder text = new StringBuilder();
    private StringBuilder dupText = new StringBuilder();

    private void accept(String letter) {
        text.append(letter);
        if (dupText.indexOf(letter, dupText.length() - letter.length()) < 0) {
            dupText.append(letter);
        }
    }

    private ContainerCollector combine(ContainerCollector other) {
        text.append(other.text);
        other.dupText.codePoints().forEach(i -> {
            String letter = new String(Character.toChars(i));
            if (dupText.indexOf(letter, dupText.length() - letter.length()) < 0) {
                dupText.append(letter);
            }
        });
        return this;
    }

    private String[] finish() {
        return new String[] { text.toString(), dupText.toString() };
    }

    private static Collector<String, ?, String[]> collector() {
        return Collector.of(ContainerCollector::new, ContainerCollector::accept, ContainerCollector::combine, ContainerCollector::finish);
    }

}

This custom collector builds the text and dupText when each letter is accepted. For the text String, the letter is always appended. For the dupText, the letter is only appended if the last one is different.

The combiner code (ran in case of parallel execution) is a bit tricky for the dupText: the second one is appended if it does not start with the end of the first one. Otherwise, the first letter is dropped and the rest is appended.

The output is the same.

  • It's all very helpful but at the end it is just way too much code. the simple for seems to be the quick and easy one. Thanks, – Ido Barash Jan 13 '16 at 14:50
3

I would make it in two separate operations. First, to get the text with duplicates:

String dupText = containersList.stream()
        .map(Container::getLetter)
        .collect(Collectors.joining());

And the second to remove the duplicates using the regexp:

String text = dupText.replaceAll("(.)\\1+", "$1");

While it's technically two-pass solution, it does not traverse input container twice and, I believe, it should be quite fast, at least not slower than other proposed solutions. And it's simple and does not require third-party libraries.

  • Nice solution. I guess using streams for skip duplications is overengineering. Regex looks very naturally. – Sergey Lagutin Jan 13 '16 at 16:51
3

Using streams is the right choice for unpacking containers. Removing repeated characters, however, is easier with loops.

I'd recommend to use the best out of both worlds:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;

class Container {

    private char letter;

    public String getLetter() {
        return Character.toString(letter);
    }

    public static Container of(char letter) {
        Container container = new Container();
        container.letter = letter;
        return container;
    }

}
public class T {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Collection<Container> containersList = new ArrayList<>();
        containersList.add(Container.of('A'));
        containersList.add(Container.of('B'));
        containersList.add(Container.of('A'));
        containersList.add(Container.of('B'));
        containersList.add(Container.of('A'));
        containersList.add(Container.of('A'));
        containersList.add(Container.of('A'));
        containersList.add(Container.of('B'));

        // at first join characters, don't bother about duplicates
        String text = containersList.stream()
        .map(Container::getLetter)
        .collect(Collectors.joining());

        // afterwards remove duplicates
        StringBuilder dupText = new StringBuilder();
        Character lastLetter = null;
        for (Character c : text.toCharArray()) {
            if (c.equals(lastLetter))
                continue;
            dupText.append(c);
            lastLetter = c;
        }

        System.out.println(text);
        System.out.println(dupText);
    }

}

A solution without loops could look like this:

// at first join characters, don't bother about duplicates
String text = containersList.stream()
        .map(Container::getLetter)
        .collect(Collectors.joining());

// afterwards remove duplicates
String dupText = text.chars()
        .mapToObj(i -> Character.toString((char)i))
        .reduce((left,right) -> {
            if (left.endsWith(right))
                return left;
            return left+right;
        })
        .get();

If you must not iterate twice, use this:

MyBuilder myBuilder = new MyBuilder();

containersList.stream()
.map(Container::getLetter)
.forEachOrdered(myBuilder::accept);

System.out.println(myBuilder.text);
System.out.println(myBuilder.dupText);

with a builder like this:

class MyBuilder {

    StringBuilder text = new StringBuilder();
    StringBuilder dupText = new StringBuilder();
    String lastLetter;

    void accept(String letter) {
        text.append(letter);

        if (letter.equals(lastLetter) == false) {
            dupText.append(letter);
        }

        lastLetter = letter;
    }
}
1

Another solution using my StreamEx library:

Collector<Entry<String, Long>, ?, String[]> collector = MoreCollectors.pairing(
    Collectors.mapping(e -> StreamEx.constant(e.getKey(), e.getValue()).joining(), 
                            Collectors.joining()),
    Collectors.mapping(e -> e.getKey(), Collectors.joining()),
    (s1, s2) -> new String[] { s1, s2 }
);
String[] result = StreamEx.of(containersList).map(Container::getLetter)
        .runLengths().collect(collector);

System.out.println(result[0]);
System.out.println(result[1]);

It should be more performant than solution proposed by @Tunaki when long series of equal letters appear: instead of collecting them to lists (via groupRuns()) this solution just counts them (via runLengths())

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