9

Given the a constructor function such as

func NewSomething(name, color string) *Something {
    s := Something{name, color}
    return &s
}

Should this function include sanity checks, such as &name == nil, or len(name) == 0? If this function should contain sanity checks, what value should be returned from the constructor? A nil value, or an error (errors.New(...))? An example is included below.

func NewSomething(name, color string) *Something {
    if &name == nil || len(name) == 0 {
        return nil
    }

    if &color== nil || len(color) == 0 {
        return nil
    }

    s := Something{name, color}
    return &s
}
  • 3
    Examples in the stdlib: url.Parse, http.NewRequest, and so on. – JimB Jan 13 '16 at 18:52
  • What led to me asking this question was this example. Instead of returning an error, the example returns a nil value, so you can see my confusion. These examples help clarify what a proper function should look like, in this use case, thank you. – We Stan Test Coverage Jan 13 '16 at 19:05
  • 1
    @battery.cord The section on errors in the same document says it's good style to return an error instead of nil. The example you linked to comes before the section on errors. Perhaps the author glossed over error handling because the topic is covered later. – Cerise Limón Jan 13 '16 at 19:40
11

Return an error. It is not idiomatic to use a distinguished value (such as nil) to indicate an error.

func NewSomething(name, color string) (*Something, error) {
  if name == "" {
    return nil, errors.New("bad name")
  }

  if color == "" {
    return nil, errors.New("bad color")
  }

  s := Something{name, color}
  return &s, nil
}

Aside: The expression &anyVariable == nil always evaluates to false. Simplify the checks to len(color) == 0 or color == "".

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