4

Here is what I want to do:

var user = db.User.First(conditions);
user.Book.First();

Here is currently how I have to do that.

var user = db.User.Include("Book").First(conditionsForUser);
user.Book.First();

The reason why I want to simplify this, is because I don't want to have to specify what is included every time I want to access a relationship. Seems very cumbersome.

e.g.: I would like to just be able to do the following, given I have previously retrieved a user:

user.Book.First()
user.Blog.First()
user.SomeOtherHasManyRelationship.Where(conditions)

Here is what I have so far:

    public object RelationshipFor(string relationship)
    {
        using (var db = User.DbContext())
        {
            var relationshipType = TypeRepresentedBy(relationship); // unused for now, not sure if I need the type of the relationship
            var myTable = ((ICollection)db.Send(RelationshipName)); // RelationshipName is "User" in this instance.
            var meWithRelationship = myTable.Where(i => i.Send(IdColumn) == Id).Include(relationship);  // currently, myTable doesn't know about 'Where' for some reason.
            return meWithRelationship.Send(relationship);
        }
    }

And then how that would be used would be the following:

user.RelationshipFor("Book") // returns a list of books

I have some other logic in my code which abstracts that further which would allow me to do user.Book.First(). Hopefully I can get permission to open source a lot of this, as I'm modelling a lot of the api after ActiveRecord-style crud.

Note, that I'm using I set of extensions I made to help dealing with dynamicness less painful: https://github.com/NullVoxPopuli/csharp-extensions

UPDATE 1:

    public object RelationshipFor(string relationship)
    {
        using (var db = User.DbContext())
        {
            var myTable = (DbSet<DatabaseModels.User>)db.Send(RelationshipName);
            var myInclude = myTable.Include(i => i.Send(relationship));
            var meWithRelationship = myInclude.First(i => (long)i.Send(IdColumn) == Id);
            return meWithRelationship.Send(relationship);
        }
    }

For now, I've hard coded the cast of the user in an attempt to just get something working. My error now is:

Unable to cast object of type 'System.Linq.Expressions.MethodCallExpressionN' to type 'System.Linq.Expressions.MemberExpression'.
  • I can cast myTable to List<object> and that gets me past the Where method not being available, but then Include isn't available – NullVoxPopuli Jan 14 '16 at 13:16
  • So, maybe my question is how do I dynamically cast to DbSet<dynamicType> – NullVoxPopuli Jan 14 '16 at 13:17
1

This is not a trivial problem, and there's no "one size fits all" approach. What you actually seem to be after is lazy loading, which was not included in EF7 for many reasons.

I don't know what the code you show is supposed to do, but one option would be to introduce a repository pattern, where you specify the "entities to include" at the collection level:

public class UserRepository
{
    private readonly IQueryable<User> _dataSet;

    public UserRepository(IQueryable<User> userDataSet)
    {
        _dataSet = userDataSet;
    }

    public IQueryable<User> Include()
    {
        return _dataSet.Include(u => u.Book)
                       .Include(u => u.Blog);
    }
}

And you can move lots of the logic to a generic base class, leaving you with just the Include() method. You can for example work with strings as you show (or enums, or ...), to only select related entities to include:

public class GenericRepository
{
    // ...

    public IQueryable<User> Include(string includeGroup = null)
    {
        return IncludeGroup(includeGroup);
    }

    protected virtual IncludeGroup(string includeGroup)
    {
        return _dataSet;
    }
}

And then in UserRepository:

protected override IQueryable<User> IncludeGroup(string includeGroup)
{
    switch (includeGroup.ToUpperInvariant())
    {
        case "BOOK":
            return _dataSet.Include(u => u.Book)
                           .Include(u => u.Book.Author);
        case "BLOG":
            return _dataSet.Include(u => u.Blog);
        default:
            return base.Include(includeGroup);
    }
}

And then use it like this:

var userRepo = new UserRepository(db.User);

var userWithBooks = userRepo.Include("Book");

var firstUser = userWithBooks.FirstOrDefault(u => u.Name == "Foo");

var firstUserFirstBook = firstUser.Book.FirstOrDefault();

One alternative would be to always include all navigation properties (recursively), but that would be a horrible approach in terms of query efficiency, as every query will be one massive join to all related tables, whether that is necessary or not.

| improve this answer | |
  • I like the pattern, but the reason why I'm trying to do this dynamically, is because we have a database-first situation with over 200 models. So, making repositories for all of them isn't scaleable. – NullVoxPopuli Jan 14 '16 at 13:36
  • But what do you want to do then? "I don't want to have to specify what is included every time I want to access a relationship" - so you want to include all related entities? Or do you want to add lazy loading yourself to EF7? For your question, Where() doesn't work because you have an ICollection, not an IQueryable<T>. – CodeCaster Jan 14 '16 at 13:37
  • You're right in that including everything would just be a pain in the efficiency butt - but I think all of this should just be inferred. Like, I should be able to have my RelationshipFor method handle the include, and re-loading of the parent model (not ideal to reload the parent, but it's better than including everything). So, I should be able to do user.RelationshipFor("Book").First()` -- at least, what's what I'm working towards. – NullVoxPopuli Jan 14 '16 at 13:39
  • I think I've made some progress. Updated OP – NullVoxPopuli Jan 14 '16 at 13:41

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