1

I'm having a little problem designing my classes.

What I want to do is the following: There are 4 classes with each their own properties. A physical and mailing address can be national or international. The contact class should have two properties of some type where I can access all the needed properties.

I've tried to a create base classes for national/international and for physical/mailing but I'm struggeling with the fact they all have different properties.

How would you model the classes in a proper way? Is it even possible in c#? I'm afraid I'll just have to create 4 properties on Contact for each of the 4 classes and do a null check to see which type of adress the object has.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Contact c = new Contact();
    }
}

public class Contact
{
    public xxx PhysicalAddress { get; set; }
    public xxx MailingAddress { get; set; }
}

public class NationalAddress
{
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }

    public Country Country { get; set; }
    public PhoneNumber Landline { get; set; }

    public string Street{ get; set; }
    public string HouseNumber{ get; set; }
    public string PostalCode{ get; set; }
    public string City{ get; set; }
}

public class InternationalAddress
{
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; } 
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }

    public Country Country { get; set; }
    public PhoneNumber Landline { get; set; }

    public string AdresRule1 { get; set; }
    public string AdresRule2 { get; set; }
    public string AdresRule3 { get; set; }
}

public class PhysicalAddress
{        
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }

    public bool IsVerified { get; set; }
    public DateTime ValidFrom { get; set; }
    public DateTime? ValidTo { get; set; }

    //Semi-detached/Terraced/Appartment/...
    public TypeOfBuilding Building{ get; set; } 
    public bool Occupied { get; set; } 
}

public class MailingAddress
{
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }

    public bool IsVerified { get; set; }
    public DateTime ValidFrom { get; set; }
    public DateTime? ValidTo { get; set; }

    public bool AllowCommercialPress { get; set; }
    public bool AllowOfficialPress { get; set; }
}

Regards,

Miscode

closed as primarily opinion-based by Hans Passant, Dmitry, krillgar, Roman Marusyk, CodeCaster Jan 14 '16 at 15:57

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    Yes, you'll certainly have a problem when you cannot think of better property names than "X", "b", "Prop3". Fix that first, come back later. – Hans Passant Jan 14 '16 at 15:50
  • That is absolutely true! But of course those property names are not the real ones and are just added to give you a better idea of the dependencies between the classes. The 4 classes are having the same properties(X). The National/International and Physical/Mailing classes are having their properties, resp a and b. I could have put a real name(or even every 79 properties) but that would not make a difference to the solution. – Miscode Jan 14 '16 at 15:59
  • My suggestion would be to take out one or two real properties instead of using "X", "b" etc. That would make your question a lot easier to read. Could you do that? – Starceaker Jan 14 '16 at 16:01
  • Hi, I've updated the question with more detailled properties. – Miscode Jan 14 '16 at 17:26
  • Looks a lot better, I upvoted it. – Starceaker Jan 14 '16 at 20:15
2

Part 1

A different approach this time --> I refactored your original properties / classes a bit.

AddressRule vs separate properties

Why doesn't an InternationalAddress have a Street, HouseNumber, ... etc? I refactored this into a List which can have one entry for your NationalAddress and multiple entries for your InternationalAddress.

Validation properties

Why are these validation properties in the Physical / Mailing address? From what I can tell these should be in the highest level.

public class Contact
{
    public PhysicalAddress PhysicalAddress { get; set; }
    public MailingAddress MailingAddress { get; set; }
}

public class AddressRule
{
    public string Street { get; set; }
    public string HouseNumber { get; set; }
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
}

public class BaseAddress
{
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }

    public Country Country { get; set; }
    public PhoneNumber Landline { get; set; }

    public List<AddressRule> AdressRules { get; set; }

    public bool IsVerified { get; set; }
    public DateTime ValidFrom { get; set; }
    public DateTime? ValidTo { get; set; }
}

public class PhysicalAddress : BaseAddress
{        
    //Semi-detached/Terraced/Appartment/...
    public TypeOfBuilding Building { get; set; }
    public bool Occupied { get; set; }
}

public class MailingAddress : BaseAddress
{       
    public bool AllowCommercialPress { get; set; }
    public bool AllowOfficialPress { get; set; }
}

Part 2

If you really need a separate class for International and National I propose to create a property of type AddressBase in your Physical / Email class which. This AddressBase property can then be either International or National.

public class Contact
{
    public PhysicalAddress PhysicalAddress { get; set; }
    public MailingAddress MailingAddress { get; set; }
}

public class AddressBase
{
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDate { get; set; }
    public Country Country { get; set; }
    public PhoneNumber Landline { get; set; }
}

public class NationalAddress : AddressBase
{
    public string Street { get; set; }
    public string HouseNumber { get; set; }
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
}

public class InternationalAddress : AddressBase
{
    public string AdresRule1 { get; set; }
    public string AdresRule2 { get; set; }
    public string AdresRule3 { get; set; }
}


//I'm guessing Mailing and Physical is meant to know where to ship to, hence the "Transport" prefix.
public class TransportAddressBase
{
    **public AddressBase AddressBaseInformation{ get; set; }**

    public bool IsVerified { get; set; }
    public DateTime ValidFrom { get; set; }
    public DateTime? ValidTo { get; set; }
}



public class PhysicalAddress : TransportAddressBase
{       
    //Semi-detached/Terraced/Appartment/...
    public TypeOfBuilding Building { get; set; }
    public bool Occupied { get; set; }
}

public class MailingAddress : TransportAddressBase
{       
    public bool AllowCommercialPress { get; set; }
    public bool AllowOfficialPress { get; set; }
}
  • Thank you for the response! What type would you choose for the physical address property in the contact class? I think that if you choose the PhysicalAddress class you can't access the National/International properties. – Miscode Jan 14 '16 at 17:30
  • Oh right. I'll edit it. – Starceaker Jan 14 '16 at 20:08
  • I'll blame the friday morning, but I still can't figure this one out :) In your example a physicalAddress can never be a NationalAddress as there is no inheritance between those classes? – Miscode Jan 15 '16 at 10:26
  • Perhaps an extra addition to my question. With physicalAddress I mean the class PhysicalAddress and not the one in contact property. You must see national/international as abstract classes as they can never exist by themselves. – Miscode Jan 15 '16 at 11:11
  • I'll edit my answer when I get back (gotta go for a few hours now). I'll try to clarify the abstraction you just mentioned. – Starceaker Jan 15 '16 at 11:27

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