2

I am trying to answer the following question: given a sorted array with some sequenced numbers and some non-sequenced numbers, write an algorithm that obtains a pair {start, end} for each group of consecutive numbers. Consecutive numbers have difference of 1 only.

So far, I can think of the brute force method only:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] array = { 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, 23, 24, 27 };
    Map<Integer, Integer> list = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

    list = findIndex(array);
}

// Bruteforce
private static Map<Integer, Integer> findIndex(int[] array) {
    Map<Integer, Integer> list = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

    int x = -1, y = -1;

    int end = array.length;
    for (int i = 0; i < end; i++) {
        x = i;
        while (i < end - 1) {

            if (array[i] + 1 == array[i + 1]) {
                i++;
                y = i;
            } else {
                if (x != y && x >= 0) {
                    list.put(x, y);
                    System.out.println("i = " + x + " to j = " + y);
                    i = i + 1;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

    }
    return list;
}

Output :

i = 0 to j = 5
i = 7 to j = 10
i = 12 to j = 14

It works fine, but how do I improve time complexity?

  • The issue with your code isn't so much the algorithmic complexity, but the clarity. This code is actually only iterating once through the array, although the nested loop is obscuring that. O(n) is the best you can do. – Andrew Palmer Jan 14 '16 at 23:54
  • @AndrewPalmer Cant we use binary search here ? – Sarah Jan 15 '16 at 0:06
  • I have to say that's a really interesting thought. It definitely wouldn't be a standard application of binary search, but depending on what is guaranteed about the array, you could determine there are 8 gaps and begin to narrow down where the gaps are. – Andrew Palmer Jan 15 '16 at 0:16
  • @Sarah no, because there is no way to know if there's any pesky out-of-sequence number in a sequence without looking at all of its elements. Assuming that there is a single outlier at an unknown position of an otherwise perfect sequence (eg.: 1 2 3 0 5), binary search can not help you find it. – tucuxi Jan 15 '16 at 14:48
1

You don't need to nest loops for this:

int end = array.length;
if (end > 0) {
    int start = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i < end; i++) {
        if (array[i] != array[i - 1] + 1) {
            if (i - start > 1) {
                list.put(start, i - 1);
                System.out.println("i = " + start + " to j = " + (i - 1));
            }
            start = i;
        } 
    }
    if (end - start > 1) {
        list.put(start, end - 1);
        System.out.println("i = " + start + " to j = " + (end - 1));
    }
}
0

As soon as initial array sorted, you can have O(N) implementation of this algorithm like this:

private static Map<Integer, Integer> getConsecutive(final int[] array) {
    final Map<Integer, Integer> list = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
    int startIndex = 0;
    int endIndex = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i < array.length; i++) {
        if (array[i - 1] + 1 == array[i])
            endIndex = i;
        else {
            if (endIndex > startIndex)
                list.put(startIndex, endIndex);
            startIndex = endIndex = i;
        }
    }
    if (endIndex > startIndex)
        list.put(startIndex, endIndex);
    return list;
}
  • 1
    This will not produce the same results as the code in the question. For one, it will not ignore isolated numbers, such as 12, 20, and 27 in the example input. – John Sensebe Jan 14 '16 at 23:30
  • 1
    @JohnSensebe it will ignore them – Iłya Bursov Jan 15 '16 at 0:03
  • Can we do this with Binary search ? – Sarah Jan 15 '16 at 0:06
  • @Sarah no, you need to inspect every element at least one time, because there could be duplicates – Iłya Bursov Jan 15 '16 at 0:07

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