18

In Scala, I can use Await to wait for a future to complete. However, if I have registered a callback to run upon completion of that future, how can I wait not only for the future to complete but also for that callback to finish?

Here is a minimal but complete program to illustrate the problem:

import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global
import scala.concurrent.duration.Duration
import scala.concurrent.{ Await, Future }

object Main {
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val f: Future[Int] = Future(0)
    f.onSuccess { case _ =>
      Thread.sleep(10000)
      println("The program waited patiently for this callback to finish.")
    }

    // This waits for `f` to complete but doesn't wait for the callback
    // to finish running.
    Await.ready(f, Duration.Inf)
  }
}

I expect the output to be:

The program waited patiently for this callback to finish.

Instead, there is no output; the program exits before the callback finishes.

Please note that this is not the same problem as waiting for a future to complete, which has been answered previously at this question.

2 Answers 2

28

Don't use an onSuccess callback, but instead do the side effect in a Future.map call. That way, you have a Future[Unit] to use Await on.

import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global
import scala.concurrent.duration.Duration
import scala.concurrent.{ Await, Future }

object Main {
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val f: Future[Int] = Future(0)
    val f2: Future[Unit] = f.map { x =>
      Thread.sleep(10000)
      println("The program waited patiently for this callback to finish.")
    }

    Await.ready(f2, Duration.Inf)
  }
}

Note that if you want to execute a side effect only in case of success (like in your example), map is appropriate. If you want to execute a side effect also in case of failure, andThen is the right method to use. See this post from Roland Kuhn on scala-user.

Also, please don't use Thread.sleep anywhere near production code.

4
  • 1
    There is no point in making 2 futures if you are throwing away the value of the first one. Might as well just run everything in a single future.
    – yǝsʞǝla
    Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 10:15
  • This was to stay as close as possible to the given code. In a real application, the first future would produce a value that you actually use. Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 10:22
  • 1
    If map and flatMap accomplish the same things as onSuccess (and more, since they can return values), why have the onSuccess in the API at all? Is it only for symmetry with onFailure? Or are onSuccess and onFailure lower-level constructs upon which map and flatMap are implemented under the hood?
    – Dan Li
    Commented Jan 16, 2016 at 4:22
  • 1
    Examining the source for Future shows that this does seem to be the case.
    – Dan Li
    Commented Jan 16, 2016 at 4:26
9
import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global
import scala.concurrent.duration.Duration
import scala.concurrent.{ Await, Future }
import scala.util._

object Main {
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val f1: Future[Int] = Future(0)
    val f2 = f1 andThen {
      case Success(v) =>
        Thread.sleep(10000)
        println("The program waited patiently for this callback to finish.")
      case Failure(e) =>
        println(e)
    }

    Await.ready(f1, Duration.Inf)
    println("F1 is COMPLETED")
    Await.ready(f2, Duration.Inf)
    println("F2 is COMPLETED")
  }
}

prints:

F1 is COMPLETED
The program waited patiently for this callback to finish.
F2 is COMPLETED

Using promises is even more clear:

import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global
import scala.concurrent.duration.Duration
import scala.concurrent._
import scala.util._

object Main {
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val f: Future[Int] = Future(0)
    val p = Promise[Unit]()
    p.future.onSuccess { case _ =>
      println("The program waited patiently for this callback to finish.")
    }
    f.onSuccess { case _ =>
      Thread.sleep(10000)
      p.success(())
    }

    Await.ready(f, Duration.Inf)
    println("F is COMPLETED")
    Await.ready(p.future, Duration.Inf)
    println("P is COMPLETED")
  }
}

prints:

F is COMPLETED
P is COMPLETED
The program waited patiently for this callback to finish.
5
  • 1
    I think promises are a low level API that should not be used if it can be avoided. So the first example using andThen is better. Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 10:27
  • Exactly. Promise is what andThen uses under the hood the perform synchronization of the onComplete handler.
    – Suma
    Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 11:36
  • In the example with Promise, if you sleep before printing This program ... it will never print. I think the example has the same problem as the original question - there is nothing waiting for p.future.onSuccess.
    – nedim
    Commented May 12, 2016 at 9:30
  • In the first example, if you are doing Await.ready(f2, Duration.Inf) and f2 is the continuation of f1, then why do you need Await.ready(f1, Duration.Inf)? Commented Oct 17, 2019 at 15:55
  • @DannyVarod You don't need both Awaits if you just want to wait for everything to complete. However, if you want to see completion of each futures separately, especially that f2 takes much longer than f1, both awaits are useful.
    – yǝsʞǝla
    Commented Oct 17, 2019 at 23:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.