48

This question already has an answer here:

I've noticed that both of these work the same:

if x not in list and if not x in list.

Is there some sort of difference between the two in certain cases? Is there a reason for having both, or is it just because it's more natural for some people to write one or the other?

Which one am I more likely to see in other people's code?

marked as duplicate by wim, Kate Gregory, Gerep, stonemetal, thegrinner Oct 29 '13 at 18:59

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65

The two forms make identical bytecode, as you can clearly verify:

>>> import dis
>>> dis.dis(compile('if x not in d: pass', '', 'exec'))
  1           0 LOAD_NAME                0 (x)
              3 LOAD_NAME                1 (d)
              6 COMPARE_OP               7 (not in)
              9 JUMP_IF_FALSE            4 (to 16)
             12 POP_TOP             
             13 JUMP_FORWARD             1 (to 17)
        >>   16 POP_TOP             
        >>   17 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             20 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> dis.dis(compile('if not x in d: pass', '', 'exec'))
  1           0 LOAD_NAME                0 (x)
              3 LOAD_NAME                1 (d)
              6 COMPARE_OP               7 (not in)
              9 JUMP_IF_FALSE            4 (to 16)
             12 POP_TOP             
             13 JUMP_FORWARD             1 (to 17)
        >>   16 POP_TOP             
        >>   17 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             20 RETURN_VALUE        

so obviously they're semantically identical.

As a matter of style, PEP 8 does not mention the issue.

Personally, I strongly prefer the if x not in y form -- that makes it immediately clear that not in is a single operator, and "reads like English". if not x in y may mislead some readers into thinking it means if (not x) in y, reads a bit less like English, and has absolutely no compensating advantages.

  • PEP 8 mentions a similar preference: “Use is not operator rather than not ... is. While both expressions are functionally identical, the former is more readable and preferred.” – Walter Tross Jan 12 at 12:58
6
>>> dis.dis(lambda: a not in b)
1           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (a)
          3 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (b)
          6 COMPARE_OP               7 (not in)
          9 RETURN_VALUE      

>>> dis.dis(lambda: not a in b)
1           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (a)
          3 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (b)
          6 COMPARE_OP               7 (not in)
          9 RETURN_VALUE  

when you do "not a in b" it will need be converted for (not in)

so, the right way is "a not in b".

4

not x in L isn't explicitly disallowed because that would be silly. x not in L is explicitly allowed (though it compiles to the same bytecode) because it's more readable.

x not in L is what everyone uses, though.

3

When you write a not in b it is using the not in operator, whereas not a in b uses the in operator and then negates the result. But the not in operator is defined to return the same as not a in b so they do exactly the same thing. From the documentation:

The operators in and not in test for collection membership. x in s evaluates to true if x is a member of the collection s, and false otherwise. x not in s returns the negation of x in s.

Similarly there is a is not b versus not a is b.

The extra syntax was added because it makes it easier for a human to read it naturally.

  • 1
    The strange part is when you use the dis module, it shows that they both compare using not in despite what the docs say... – avacariu Aug 28 '10 at 19:36
1

It just personal preference. You could also compare if x != 3 and if not x == 3. There's no difference between the two expressions you've shown.

  • 11
    Those are not identical. != calls __ne__ and == calls __eq__. In perverse cases your examples may have different results – John La Rooy Aug 14 '10 at 1:25
  • 1
    True enough. I should have added, "perversion aside"! – Ned Batchelder Aug 14 '10 at 1:40

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