10

Recently, I encountered a weird problem with passing a function passed as a parameter to a lambda expression. The code compiled just fine with clang 3.5+, but failed with g++ 5.3 and I wonder whether the problem is in the c++ standard, a non-standard extension in clang, or an invalid syntactic interpretation in GCC.

The example code is fairy simple:

    template<typename Fn, typename... Args, typename T = typename std::result_of<Fn(Args...)>::type>
    std::future<T>
    async(Fn &&fn, Args &&... args)
    {
        std::shared_ptr<std::promise<T>> promise = std::make_shared<std::promise<T>>();
        auto lambda = [promise, fn, args...](void)
            { promise->set_value(fn(std::move(args)...)); };
        send_message(std::make_shared<post_call>(lambda));
        return promise->get_future();
    };

GCC reported the following:

error: variable ‘fn’ has function type
             { promise->set_value(fn(std::move(args)...)); };
(...)
error: field ‘async(Fn&&, Args&& ...) [with Fn = int (&)(int, int); Args = {int&, int&}; T = int]::<lambda()>::<fn capture>’ invalidly declared function type
         auto lambda = [promise, fn, args...](void)

Fortunately, I found a simple workaround, adding a std::function object, encapsulating the function parameter:

    template<typename Fn, typename... Args, typename T = typename std::result_of<Fn(Args...)>::type>
    std::future<T>
    async(Fn &&fn, Args &&... args)
    {
        std::shared_ptr<std::promise<T>> promise = std::make_shared<std::promise<T>>();
        std::function<T(typename std::remove_reference<Args>::type...)> floc = fn;
        auto lambda = [promise, floc, args...](void)
            { promise->set_value(floc(std::move(args)...)); };
        send_message(std::make_shared<post_call>(lambda));
        return promise->get_future();
    };

Although I don't fully understand what was wrong in the first piece of code, that successfully compiled with clang and run without errors.


EDIT

I've just noticed, that my solution fails catastrophically, if one of the arguments was supposed to be a reference. So if you have any other suggestions that might work with C++11 (i.e. without specialized lambda captures [c++14 feature]), it would be really cool...

3
  • What happens if you pass auto p_fn = &fn to the lambda? Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 16:49
  • @JoelCornett sigsegv or something similar. Same thing happend with passing fn as a reference. Though it compiles, in both cases.
    – Marandil
    Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 16:53
  • 1
    @JoelCornett In concurrent/async environment passing a pointer to a scoped variable is never a good idea. Commented Dec 12, 2018 at 8:30

2 Answers 2

8

The variable fn has function type. In particular, it has type Fn = int (&)(int, int).

A value of type Fn (not a reference) is of type int(int,int).

This value cannot be stored.

I am vaguely surprised it won't auto-decay it for you. In C++14, you can do:

auto lambda = [promise, fn=fn, args...](void)
        { promise->set_value(fn(std::move(args)...)); };

which should decay the type of fn (externally) to fn internally. If that doesn't work:

auto lambda = [promise, fn=std::decay_t<Fn>(fn), args...](void)
        { promise->set_value(fn(std::move(args)...)); };

which explicitly decays it. (Decay is an operation that makes a type suitable for storage).

Second, you should add mutable:

auto lambda = [promise, fn=std::decay_t<Fn>(fn), args...](void)mutable
        { promise->set_value(fn(std::move(args)...)); };

or the std::move won't do much. (moving a const value doesn't do much).

Third, you can move the promise in instead of creating a needless shared ptr:

template<typename Fn, typename... Args, typename T = typename std::result_of<Fn(Args...)>::type>
std::future<T>
async(Fn &&fn, Args &&... args)
{
    std::promise<T> promise;
    std::future<T> ret = promise.get_future();
    auto lambda =
      [promise=std::move(promise), fn=std::decay_t<Fn>(fn), args...]
      () mutable {
        promise.set_value(fn(std::move(args)...));
      };
    send_message(std::make_shared<post_call>(lambda));
    return ret;
};

this presumes your post_call class can handle move-only lambdas (if it is a std::function it cannot).

2
  • Wow, many thanks for the advice, but unfortunately most of them require C++14, and I've decided to stick to C++11 for the project (both compilers complain about using c++14 extensions when using initialized lambda captures, while I'm trying to stick to pure c++11), so the promise must stay a pointer (though I guess it could be just normal pointer, but I'm not so sure what's going to happen in both cases, when the lambda is never going to be run...). Will use your advice for sure, once I'm about to write something with c++1y ;)
    – Marandil
    Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 17:32
  • 2
    @Marandil Move-into lambdas can be written manually as helper types (it is a bit verbose, I admit). You can solve the decay problem by storing a copy of fn locally with auto my_fn = std::forward<Fn>(fn);, then capture my_fn. Note that my C++14 version above (and yours) needlessly copies the args... into the lambda: this is inefficient. Commented Jan 15, 2016 at 18:36
0

Your first code compiles fine under VS2015, so i can't reproduce your problem but since you're using universal references, i would try something like :

template<typename Fn, typename... Args, typename T = typename std::result_of<Fn(Args...)>::type>
std::future<T> async2(Fn &&fn, Args &&... args)
{
    std::promise<T> prom;
    auto floc = std::bind(std::forward<Fn>(fn), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    auto lambda = [&prom, floc](void)
    { prom.set_value(floc()); };
    send_message(std::make_shared<post_call>(lambda));
    return prom.get_future();
};

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