1461

I have a string, "004-034556", that I want to split into two strings:

string1="004";
string2="034556";

That means the first string will contain the characters before '-', and the second string will contain the characters after '-'. I also want to check if the string has '-' in it. If not, I will throw an exception. How can I do this?

33 Answers 33

-1

From the documentation:

public String[] split(String regex,int limit) Splits this string around matches of the given regular expression. The array returned by this method contains each substring of this string that is terminated by another substring that matches the given expression or is terminated by the end of the string. The substrings in the array are in the order in which they occur in this string. If the expression does not match any part of the input then the resulting array has just one element, namely this string.

Basically you can do something like this:

String s = "123-456-789-123"; // The String to be split
String[] array = s.split("-"); // Split according to the hyphen and put them in an array
for(String subString : array){ // Cycle through the array
   System.out.println(subString);
}

Output:

123
456
789
123
-1
 String string = "004^034556-34";
 String[] parts = string.split(Pattern.quote("^"));

If you have a special character then you can use Patter.quote. If you simply have dash (-) then you can shorten the code:

 String string = "004-34";
 String[] parts = string.split("-");

If you try to add other special character in place of dash (^) then the error will generate ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException. For that you have to use Pattern.quote.

  • 7
    Please don't post answers that simply repeat existing answers. – james.garriss Oct 30 '17 at 16:54
-6

Sometimes if you want to split string containing + then it won't split; instead you will get a runtime error. In that case, first replace + to _ and then split:

 this.text=text.replace("/", "_");
            String temp[]=text.split("_");
  • 14
    This is because the argument to split is a regular expression. A better solution is to correctly escape the regular expression. – Max Mar 27 '13 at 16:49

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