9

I have a vector class:

class Vector:
    def __init__(self, x, y):
        self.x, self.y = x, y
    def __str__(self):
        return '(%s,%s)' % (self.x, self.y)
    def __add__(self, n):
        if isinstance(n, (int, long, float)):
            return Vector(self.x+n, self.y+n)
        elif isinstance(n, Vector):
            return Vector(self.x+n.x, self.y+n.y)

which works fine, i.e. I can write:

a = Vector(1,2)
print(a + 1) # prints (2,3)

However if the order of operation is reversed, then it fails:

a = Vector(1,2)
print(1 + a) # raises TypeError: unsupported operand type(s)
             #                   for +: 'int' and 'instance'

I understand the error: the addition of an int object to an Vector object is undefined because I haven't defined it in the int class. Is there a way to work around this without defining it in the int (or parent of int) class?

1

2 Answers 2

10

You need to also define __radd__

Some operations do not necessarily evaluate like this a + b == b + a and that's why Python defines the add and radd methods.

Explaining myself better: it supports the fact that "int" does not define a + operation with class Vector instances as part of the operation. Therefore vector + 1 is not the same as 1 + vector.

When Python tries to see what the 1.__add__ method can do, an exception is raised. And Python goes and looks for Vector.__radd__ operation to try to complete it.

In the OP's case the evaluation is true and suffices with __radd__ = __add__

class Vector(object):

    def __init__(self, x, y):
        self.x, self.y = x, y

    def __str__(self):
        return '(%s,%s)' % (self.x, self.y)

    def __add__(self, n):
        if isinstance(n, (int, long, float)):
            return Vector(self.x+n, self.y+n)
        elif isinstance(n, Vector):
            return Vector(self.x+n.x, self.y+n.y)

    __radd__ = __add__


a = Vector(1, 2)
print(1 + a)

Which outputs:

(2,3)

The same applies to all number-like operations.

6
  • Maybe some more explanation is needed here?
    – Rob Murray
    Jan 16, 2016 at 12:51
  • is it similar for __mul__, __div__, etc? so __rmul__, __rdiv__, etc?
    – nluigi
    Jan 16, 2016 at 12:52
  • Yes if the first object in the operation (everything is an object) does not support the operation with the 2nd object
    – mementum
    Jan 16, 2016 at 13:00
  • good answer, I'm accepting this answer mainly because of the hint __radd__=__add__, i like one-line solutions :)
    – nluigi
    Jan 16, 2016 at 13:03
  • In your case it is the solution ;)
    – mementum
    Jan 16, 2016 at 13:07
4

When you say x + y, Python calls x.__add__(y). If x does not implement __add__ (or that method returns NotImplemented), Python tries to call y.__radd__(x) as a fallback.

Thus all you have to do is to define the __radd__() method in your Vector class and 1 + y will work as you would expect.

Note: you would have to do similar for other operations too, e.g. implement __mul__() and __rmul__() pair, etc.

You might also want to look at this question, it explains the same principle in more details.

Update: Depending on your use case, you might also want to implement the __iadd__() method (and its cousins) to override the += operator.

For example, if you say y += 1 (y being an instance of Vector here), you might want to modify the y instance itself, and not return a new Vector instance as a result, which what your __add__() method currently does.

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