I am making a TICTAC Toe game. I'am using 2D array and I'm having problem in calling and passing the array in a function call.
What's this erroe means ?

enter image description here

char mark=move(matrix,turn,yourTurn);

My function move is :

int move(char matrix[3][3],int turn,int &move)

{
    char mark;

    if(turn==1)
    {
        mark='X';
    }
    else
        mark='O';

        switch (move)
        {

        case 1:
            matrix[0][0]=mark;
            return matrix[0][0];
        case 2:
            matrix[0][1]=mark;
            return matrix[0][1];
        case 3:
            matrix[0][2]=mark;
            return matrix[0][2];
        case 4:
            matrix[1][0]=mark;
            return matrix[1][0];
        case 5:
            matrix[1][1]=mark;
            return matrix[1][1];
        case 6:
            matrix[1][2]=mark;
            return matrix[1][2];
        case 7:
            matrix[2][0]=mark;
            return matrix[2][0];
        case 8:
            matrix[2][1]=mark;
            return matrix[2][1];
        case 9:
            matrix[2][2]=mark;
            return matrix[2][2];

    default:
        cout<<"You can only mark 1 to 9 on the board";
        break;
    }
}

isFull() function This function tells me is that place is already filled or not. Its not complete yet because I'm stuck.

bool isFull(char matrix[3][3])
{
    for (int row = 0; row < 3; row++)
    {
       for (int col = 0; col < 3; col++)
       {
          if (matrix[row][col]=='X'||matrix[row][col]=='O')
          {
            return true;
          }
       }
    }
return false;
}
  • 2
    The types don't match. First of all, you're returning an int with move() and you are assigning the int to a char. Implicit conversions are evil, avoid them. Apart from that, your first parameter in the isFull() and move() functions is incorrectly typed. – K. Gkinis Jan 17 '16 at 8:59
  • It doesn't help i have changed the function type of move() with char and receiving a value in char variable and also i have the prototype too. But ? – Zain Tanveer Jan 17 '16 at 9:08
  • Post the functions initializerGame() and isFull() please. – K. Gkinis Jan 17 '16 at 9:21
  • Updated isFull () but I didn't uploaded initializer because its just drawing, just game boundary. – Zain Tanveer Jan 17 '16 at 9:28
  • 2
    Hunch: You have declarations before main with different prototypes from the function definitions. (For instance, bool isFull(char matrix)) – molbdnilo Jan 17 '16 at 9:40

Let me help you on your code, by simplifying:

#include <array>

using namespace std;

// ...

int move(array<array <char, 3>, 3 > &matrix, const int turn, const int moveVal)
{
    char mark;

    if(turn==1)
    {
        mark='X';
    }
    else
    {
        mark='O';
    }

    if(moveVal <= 0 || moveVal > 9)
    {
        cout<<"You can only mark 1 to 9 on the board";
    }
    else
    {
        const int x = (moveVal-1) % 3;
        const int y = (moveVal-1) / 3;

        matrix[x][y]=mark;
    }

    return mark;
}

Because this is C++ code, why not pass a reference to array of arrays? Why? Well the classic C Arrays are also pointers and in my opinion a bit confusing for beginners. Unless you want go more into C-Style I would not bother about them. Two-Dimensional arrays are best treated as strides within a one-dimensional arrays, because your memory is always one-dimensional and you have to find a way to handle it that way.

If you define a static two-dimensional array like char matrix[3][3] The compiler automatically knows it will become a array of nine elements with different access pattern. If you make this array more of being dynamic, where sizes can change etc. your memory management will most likely split it up in different fragments.

That's the reason why C++ with STL have std::vector and std::array as templates which with itself can be combined. Try to use these unless you want to understand more about memory management, arrays and pointers in C.

The error is funny and not warrented for the code you present. Probably molbdino's hunch is correct that there is a declaration somewhere which you didn't show us. Why don't you present a complete, minimal example? In fact, that effort would probably already solve your problem without asking here.--

With the function signature you present, int move(char matrix[3][3],int turn,int &move), the compiler ignores the first dimension of the parameter declaration. The function simply expects a pointer to an array of three ints. In C (and the C-ish parts of C++) there is no direct way to pass an array to a function, because that is one of the places where an array "decays" to a pointer to its first element. (The reason that all the other dimensions except the very first one are relevant is that indexing the resulting pointer needs information about the size of the elements it points to, which is computed from the remaining dimensions.)

The following declarations are equivalent:

void isFull(int arr[3][3]);    // first dimension is ingnored
void isFull(int arr[100][3]);  // first dimension is ingnored anyway
void isFull(int arr[][3]);     // is equivalent to the next one
void isFull(int (*arr)[3]);    // this is what actually is declared and passed

In C++ there is the possiblility to pass references to arrays which do "preserve" all array dimensions (by the way, pointers to arrays would do that too, even in C; it's just less common). The disadvantage is of course that it's less flexible because the array's size is hard coded. In your case of Tic Tac Toe that's not a problem though.

Here is a little program which illustrates the issue. Note that in the commented-out call with a differently sized array the compiler only complains about the second parameter, the reference. It couldn't care less about how many elements are behind the memory location pointed to by the first parameter.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void f(int arr[100][3], int (&arr_ref)[4][3])
{
    cout << "size of arr parameter:            " << sizeof(arr) << endl;
    cout << "size of pointer:                  " << sizeof(int *) << endl << endl;
    cout << "size of first arr element:        " << sizeof(*arr) 
        << " (which is " << sizeof(*arr)/sizeof(**arr) 
        << " times the size of *its* elements)" << endl << endl;

    cout << "size of object arr ref refers to: " << sizeof(arr_ref) 
        << " (which is " << sizeof(arr_ref)/sizeof(**arr_ref) 
        << " times the size of an int, " << sizeof(int) << ")." << endl;
}

int main()
{
    int arr[4][3];
    int wrong_arr[5][3];

    // f(wrong_arr, wrong_arr);
            // 2d-array-param-decl.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
            // 2d-array-param-decl.cpp:23:24: error: invalid 
            // initialization of reference of type ‘int (&)[4][3]’ 
            // from expression of type ‘int [5][3]’
            // f(wrong_arr, wrong_arr);
                                // ^
            // 2d-array-param-decl.cpp:5:6: note: in passing argument 2 
            // of ‘void f(int (*)[3], int (&)[4][3])’
            // void f(int arr[100][3], int (&arr_ref)[4][3])
            //      ^

    f(arr, arr);

    return 0;
}

Sample session:

$ g++ -Wall -o 2d-array-param-decl 2d-array-param-decl.cpp && ./2d-array-param-decl
2d-array-param-decl.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
2d-array-param-decl.cpp:27:6: warning: unused variable ‘wrong_arr’ [-Wunused-variable]
  int wrong_arr[5][3];
      ^
size of arr parameter:            8
size of pointer:                  8

size of first arr element:        12 (which is 3 times the size of *its* elements)

size of object arr ref refers to: 48 (which is 12 times the size of an int, 4).
  • 1
    char matrix[3][3] would work and allow the contents to be changed – M.M Jan 17 '16 at 10:15
  • @M.M. You mean because the first dimension is ignored anyway and the OP's function signature amounts to int move(char matrix[][3],int turn,int &move), which is equivalent to int move(char (*matrix)[3],int turn,int &move)... cf. eskimo.com/~scs/cclass/int/sx9a.html. Good catch. – Peter A. Schneider Jan 17 '16 at 10:27

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