3

I am trying to extend a typescript class in another file like so:

a.ts:

module MyModule {
    public Name: string;
    export class MyClassA
    {
    }
}

b.ts:

module MyModule {
    export class MyClassB extends MyClassA
    {
    }
}

But I get the error that MyClassA cannot be found.

Both files are inside my tsconfig.json files array. What am I doing wrong?

0

But I get the error that MyClassA cannot be found.

You probably have a root level import or an export statement in your file. That makes the file a module in the project and disconnects it from the global namespace. So module MyModule in file A is not the same as it is in file B. More on modules.

This is a good thing. You don't want to pollute the global namespace more.

Solution

Learn to use a module loader. My recommendataion : webpack.

|improve this answer|||||
  • the more link is dead, a bit more of information would be helpful. – Legends Feb 21 '18 at 21:23
2

Add reference a.ts reference to b.ts file like this:

/// <reference path="a.ts" />
module MyModule {
    export class MyClassB extends MyClassA
    {
    }
}

or use import like this:

import MyModule = require("MyModule")
|improve this answer|||||
1

I will provide an example how to reference classes from other .ts files.

In this example we have four .ts files which are modules by default (external modules), except the fourth file app.ts

Typescript Modules

In TypeScript, just as in ECMAScript 2015, any file containing a top-level import or export is considered a module. Conversely, a file without any top-level import or export declarations is treated as a script whose contents are available in the global scope (and therefore to modules as well).


Example:

We have a class Man and a class Woman which inherit from class Human. In app.ts we create an instance of Man.

Human.ts

export class Human {

    public Name: string;

    constructor(name: string) {
        this.Name = name;
    }


    public WhatIsMyName() {
        console.log(`I am ${this.Name}`);
        return this.Name;
    }
}

Man.ts

import { Human } from "./Human";

export class Man extends Human {
    constructor(name: string) {
        super(name);
    }
}

Woman.ts

import { Human } from "./Human";

    export class Woman extends Human {
        constructor(name: string) {
            super(name);
        }
    }

YourApp.ts

import { Man } from "./man";

const man = new Man("Billy The Kid");
man.WhatIsMyName();
|improve this answer|||||
0

extends MyModule.MyClassA seems to work:

a.ts:

module MyModule {
    export class MyClassA {}
}

b.ts:

///<reference path="a.ts" />
module MyModule {
    export class MyClassB extends MyModule.MyClassA {}
}

Not sure if this works everywhere and if it's good practice.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.