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I'm working on a sort of a 2D Minecraft clone for my first in depth Pyglet project and I've run across a problem. Whenever I have a decent number of blocks on screen, the frame rate drops dramatically.

Here is my rendering method: I use a dictionary with the key being a tuple(which represents the coordinate for the block) and the item being a texture.

I loop through the entire dictionary and render each block:

for key in self.blocks:
    self.blocks[key].blit(key[0] * 40 + sx,key[1] * 40+ sy)

P.S. sx and sy are coordinate offsets for screen scrolling

I would like to know if there is a way to more efficiently render each block.

  • You should improve performance by iterating over your dict using items (or iteritems in python2). Also might your self.blocks not be better implemented as a list? Given that you access it in such a linear fashion, a dict may not have such an advantage. You will be burning a lot of time computing hashes. – Paul Rooney Jan 18 '16 at 3:22
  • 1
    @PaulRooney His/Her's problem is that using loops in any way will be a bottle-neck. Batched rendering is basically the only way out at this point. That and making your custom main class for event triggering and clock rates. I posted a small example below, hope it helps. – Torxed Jan 18 '16 at 18:24
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I'm going to do my best to explain why and how to optemize your code without actually knowing what you code looks like.

I will assume you have something along the lines of:

self.blocks['monster001'] = pyglet.image.load('./roar.png')

This is all fine and dandy, if you want to load a static image that you don't want to do much with. However, you're making a game and you are going to use a hell of a lot more sprites and objects than just one simple image file.

Now this is where shared objects, batches and sprites come in handy. First off, input your image into a sprite, it's a good start.

sprite = pyglet.sprite.Sprite(pyglet.image.load('./roar.png'))
sprite.draw() # This is instead of blit. Position is done via sprite.x = ...

Now, draw is a hell of a lot quicker than .blit() for numerous of reasons, but we'll skip why for now and just stick with blazing speed upgrades.

Again, this is just one small step towards successful framerates (other than having limited hardware ofc.. duh).

Anyway, back to pew pew your code with upgrades.
Now you also want to add sprites to a batch so you can simultaneously render a LOT of things on one go (read: batch) instead of manually pushing things to the graphics card. Graphic cards soul purpose was designed to be able to handle gigabits of throughput in calculations in one insanely fast go rather than handle multiple of small I/O's.

To do this, you need to create a batch container. And add "layers" to it.
It's quite simple really, all you need to do is:

main_batch = pyglet.graphics.Batch()
background = pyglet.graphics.OrderedGroup(0)
# stuff_above_background = pyglet.graphics.OrderedGroup(1)
# ...

We'll stick one with batch for now, you probably don't need more for this learning purpose.
Ok so you got your batch, now what? Well now we try our hardest to choke that living hell out of your graphics card and see if we can even buckle it under pressure (No graphic cars were harmed in this process, and please don't choke things..)

Oh one more thing, remember the note about shared objects? well, we'll create a shared image object here that we push into the sprite, instead of loading one new image every.. single... time.. monster_image we'll call it.

monster_image = pyglet.image.load('./roar.png')
for i in range(100): # We'll create 100 test monsters
    self.blocks['monster'+str(i)] = pyglet.sprite.Sprite(imgage=monster_image, x=0, y=0, batch=main_batch, group=background)

Now you have 100 monsters created and added to the batch main_batch into the sub-group background. Simple as pie.

Here's the kicker, instead of calling self.blocks[key].blit() or .draw(), we can now call main_batch.draw() and it will fire away every single monster onto the graphics card and produce wonders.

Ok, so now you've optimized the speed of your code, but really that won't help you in the long run if you're making a game. Or in this case, a graphics engine for your game. What you want to do is step up into the big league and use classes. If you were amazed before you'll probably loose your marbles of how awesome your code will look once you've done with it.

Ok so first, you want to create a base class for your objects on the screen, lets called in baseSprite.
Now there are some kinks and stuff you need to work around with Pyglet, for one, when inheriting Sprite objects trying to set image will cause all sorts of iffy glitches and bugs when working with stuff so we'll set self.texture directly which is basically the same thing but we hook into the pyglet libraries variables instead ;D pew pew hehe.

class baseSprite(pyglet.sprite.Sprite):
    def __init__(self, texture, x, y, batch, subgroup):
        self.texture = texture

        super(baseSprite, self).__init__(self.texture, batch=batch, group=subgroup)
        self.x = x
        self.y = y

    def move(self, x, y):
        """ This function is just to show you
            how you could improve your base class
            even further """
        self.x += x
        self.y += y

    def _draw(self):
        """
        Normally we call _draw() instead of .draw() on sprites
        because _draw() will contains so much more than simply
        drawing the object, it might check for interactions or
        update inline data (and most likely positioning objects).
        """
        self.draw()

Now that's your base, you can now create monsters by doing:

main_batch = pyglet.graphics.Batch()
background = pyglet.graphics.OrderedGroup(0)
monster_image = pyglet.image.load('./roar.png')
self.blocks['monster001'] = baseSprite(monster_image, 10, 50, main_batch, background)
self.blocks['monster002'] = baseSprite(monster_image, 70, 20, main_batch, background)

...
main_batch.draw()

How, you probably use the default @on_window_draw() example that everyone else is using and that's fine, but I find it slow, ugly and just not practical in the long run. You want to do Object Oriented Programming.. Right?
That's what it's called, I call it readable code that you like to watch all day long. RCTYLTWADL for short.

To do this, we'll need to create a class that mimics the behavior of Pyglet and call it's subsequent functions in order and poll the event handler otherwise sh** will get stuck, trust me.. Done it a couple of times and bottle necks are easy to create.
But enough of my mistakes, here's a basic main class that you can use that uses poll-based event handling and thus limiting the refresh rate to your programming rather than built in behavior in Pyglet.

class main(pyglet.window.Window):
    def __init__ (self):
        super(main, self).__init__(800, 800, fullscreen = False)
        self.x, self.y = 0, 0
        self.sprites = {}
        self.batches = {}
        self.subgroups = {}

        self.alive = 1

    def on_draw(self):
        self.render()

    def on_close(self):
        self.alive = 0

    def render(self):
        self.clear()

        for batch_name, batch in self.batches.items():
            batch.draw()

        for sprite_name, sprite in self.sprites.items():
            sprite._draw()

        self.flip() # This updates the screen, very much important.

    def run(self):
        while self.alive == 1:
            self.render()

            # -----------> This is key <----------
            # This is what replaces pyglet.app.run()
            # but is required for the GUI to not freeze.
            # Basically it flushes the event pool that otherwise
            # fill up and block the buffers and hangs stuff.
            event = self.dispatch_events()

x = main()
x.run()

Now this is again just a basic main class that does nothing other than render a black background and anything put into self.sprites and self.batches.

Do note! we call ._draw() on the sprites because we created our own sprite class earlier? Yea that's the awesome base sprite class that you can hook in your own stuff before draw() is done on each individual sprite.

Anywho, This all boils down to a couple of things.

  1. Use sprites when making games, your life will be easier
  2. Use batches, your GPU will love you and the refreshrates will be amazing
  3. Use classes and stuff, your eyes and code mojo will love you in the end.

Here's a fully working example of all the pieces puzzled together:

import pyglet
from pyglet.gl import *

glEnable(GL_BLEND)
glBlendFunc(GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA)
glEnable(GL_LINE_SMOOTH)
glHint(GL_LINE_SMOOTH_HINT, GL_DONT_CARE)

pyglet.clock.set_fps_limit(60)

class baseSprite(pyglet.sprite.Sprite):
    def __init__(self, texture, x, y, batch, subgroup):
        self.texture = texture

        super(baseSprite, self).__init__(self.texture, batch=batch, group=subgroup)
        self.x = x
        self.y = y

    def move(self, x, y):
        """ This function is just to show you
            how you could improve your base class
            even further """
        self.x += x
        self.y += y

    def _draw(self):
        """
        Normally we call _draw() instead of .draw() on sprites
        because _draw() will contains so much more than simply
        drawing the object, it might check for interactions or
        update inline data (and most likely positioning objects).
        """
        self.draw()

class main(pyglet.window.Window):
    def __init__ (self):
        super(main, self).__init__(800, 800, fullscreen = False)
        self.x, self.y = 0, 0
        self.sprites = {}
        self.batches = {}
        self.subgroups = {}

        self._handles = {}

        self.batches['main'] = pyglet.graphics.Batch()
        self.subgroups['base'] = pyglet.graphics.OrderedGroup(0)

        monster_image = pyglet.image.load('./roar.png')
        for i in range(100):
            self._handles['monster'+str(i)] = baseSprite(monster_image, randint(0, 50), randint(0, 50), self.batches['main'], self.subgroups['base'])

        # Note: We put the sprites in `_handles` because they will be rendered via
        # the `self.batches['main']` batch, and placing them in `self.sprites` will render
        # them twice. But we need to keep the handle so we can use `.move` and stuff
        # on the items later on in the game making process ;)

        self.alive = 1

    def on_draw(self):
        self.render()

    def on_close(self):
        self.alive = 0

    def render(self):
        self.clear()

        for batch_name, batch in self.batches.items():
            batch.draw()

        for sprite_name, sprite in self.sprites.items():
            sprite._draw()

        self.flip() # This updates the screen, very much important.

    def run(self):
        while self.alive == 1:
            self.render()

            # -----------> This is key <----------
            # This is what replaces pyglet.app.run()
            # but is required for the GUI to not freeze.
            # Basically it flushes the event pool that otherwise
            # fill up and block the buffers and hangs stuff.
            event = self.dispatch_events()

            # Fun fact:
            #   If you want to limit your FPS, this is where you do it
            #   For a good example check out this SO link:
            #   http://stackoverflow.com/questions/16548833/pyglet-not-running-properly-on-amd-hd4250/16548990#16548990

x = main()
x.run()

Some bonus stuff, I added GL options that usually does some benefitial stuff for you. I also added sa FPS limiter that you can tinker and play with.

Edit:

Batched updates

Since the sprite object can be used to do massive renderings in one go by sending it all to the graphics card, similarly you'd want to do batched updates. For instance if you want to update every objects position, color or whatever it might be.

This is where clever programming comes into play rather than nifty little tools.
See, everything i relevant in programming.. If you want it to be.

Assume you have (at the top of your code) a variable called:

global_settings = {'player position' : (50, 50)}
# The player is at X cord 50 and Y cord 50.

In your base sprite you could simply do the following:

class baseSprite(pyglet.sprite.Sprite):
    def __init__(self, texture, x, y, batch, subgroup):
        self.texture = texture

        super(baseSprite, self).__init__(self.texture, batch=batch, group=subgroup)
        self.x = x + global_settings['player position'][0]#X
        self.y = y + global_settings['player position'][1]#Y

Note that you'd have to tweak the draw() (note, not _draw() since batched rendering will call upon draw and not _draw) function a little bit to honor and update position updates per rendering sequence. That or you could create a new class that inherits baseSprite and have only those types of sprite updated:

class monster(baseSprite):
    def __init__(self, monster_image, main_batch, background):
        super(monster, self).__init__(imgage=monster_image, x=0, y=0, batch=main_batch, group=background)
    def update(self):
        self.x = x + global_settings['player position'][0]#X
        self.y = y + global_settings['player position'][1]#Y

And thus only call .update() on monster type classes/sprites.
It's a bit tricky to get it optimal and there's ways to solve it and still use batched rendering, but somewhere along these lines is probably a good start.



IMPORTANT NOTE I just wrote a lot of this from the top of my head (not the first time I've written a GUI class in Pyglet) and for whatever reason this *Nix instance of mine doesn't find my X-server.. So can't test the code.

I'll give it a test in an hour when I get off work, but this gives you a general Idea of what to do and what to think for when making games in Pyglet. Remember, have fun while doing it or you're quit before you even started because games take time to make ^^

Pew pew lazors and stuff, best of luck!

  • Dude, You are a living encyclopedia! Everything you said makes complete sense. Thanks a lot! I'm going to implement everything you said. Also, thanks for explaining how a graphics card works, I was confused at how I was getting 60 fps on 3D games vs 15 on a simple 2D renderer. – Areeb Jan 18 '16 at 21:11
  • One more question, what does "event = self.dispatch_events()" do? In your main class? – Areeb Jan 18 '16 at 21:21
  • @Areeb It empties the buffert of Pyglet. If you don't empty buffers they will get full and once something tries to input more stuff into the buffert, the buffer will say "dude wait a second" and whatever code is trying to do the input will go "hmm ok sure I'll wait" and hang everything more often than not. This is true for file bufferts such as subprocess.Popen stdout pipe as well. So yea, it empties the buffer so your program doesn't hang. – Torxed Jan 18 '16 at 21:45
  • Oh that makes sense, thanks! – Areeb Jan 18 '16 at 22:19
  • @Areeb NP, gl with your game making! Don't forget to enjoy your game at the end :) – Torxed Jan 19 '16 at 6:48

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