Consider the curl command below, is it possible to allow newline in JSON (without the minify) and execute directly in bash (Mac/Ubuntu)

curl -0 -v -X POST http://www.example.com/api/users \
-H "Expect:" \
-H 'Content-Type: text/json; charset=utf-8' \
-d \
'
{
    "field1": "test",
    "field2": {
        "foo": "bar"
    }
}'

When I run the command above, seems error occurred at the second { How to fix the above command?

Updated: actually I was able to run the command without issue previously, not sure why problem happen recently.

  • Can you tell us more about the error? Your example works "as is" on my system. mymac > bash --version GNU bash, version 3.2.57(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin15) Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. – Eric Bolinger Jan 27 '16 at 21:00
  • Yup, works for me as well: GNU bash, version 4.3.42(1)-release – miken32 Jan 29 '16 at 4:43
  • 1
    Also check out ANSI C-like string syntax: echo $'here is a newline:\nand here is a tab:\t' – miken32 Jan 29 '16 at 19:50

I remembered another way to do this with a "Here Document" as described in the Bash man page and detailed here. The @- means to read the body from STDIN, while << EOF means to pipe the script content until "EOF" as STDIN to curl. This layout may be easier to read than using separate files or the "echo a variable" approach.

curl -0 -v -X POST http://www.example.com/api/users \
-H "Expect:" \
-H 'Content-Type: text/json; charset=utf-8' \
-d @- << EOF

{
    "field1": "test",
    "field2": {
        "foo": "bar"
    }
}
EOF

NOTE: Use the --trace <outfile> curl option to record exactly what goes over the wire. For some reason, this Here Document approach strips newlines?!?

  • 4
    This is clean, no extra quoting, no escaping and it works very well. Thanks. – Seth Dec 20 '16 at 17:53
  • Can we use pipes with such a syntax? – Ivan Balashov Mar 8 at 14:31
  • Yes you can pipe the output to another command, although the placement is right in the middle. Add the stdout redirect after the stdin redirect. Example using word count: -d @- << EOF | wc – Eric Bolinger May 4 at 15:15

Along the lines of Martin's suggestion of putting the JSON in a variable, you could also put the JSON in a separate file, and then supply the filename to -d using curl's @ syntax:

curl -0 -v -X POST http://www.example.com/api/users \
  -H "Expect:" \
  -H 'Content-Type: text/json; charset=utf-8' \
  -d @myfile.json

The disadvantage is obvious (2 or more files where you used to have one.) But on the plus side, your script could accept a filename or directory argument and you'd never need to edit it, just run it on different JSON files. Whether that's useful depends on what you are trying to accomplish.

  • 1
    Note: make sure you've valid json content through jsonlint.com – vikramvi Feb 20 at 14:10
  • This approach is clean and easy to debug compared to others. – vikramvi Feb 20 at 14:22

You could assign your json to a var:

json='
{
    "field1": "test",
    "field2": {
        "foo": "bar"
    }
}'

Now you can forward this to curl using stdin:

echo $json | curl -0 -v -X POST http://www.example.com/api/users \
-H "Expect:" \
-H 'Content-Type: text/json; charset=utf-8' \
-d @-
  • Using single quotes to surround the block means that you cannot use variables (e.g. ${username}) in the JSON. – Air Jan 6 '17 at 3:10
  • Yup, but using double quotes means you can't use $ signs in your data. Pick which one is right for you. – Martin Konecny Jan 6 '17 at 6:13

You should use outer double quotes, and the escape all inner quotes like this:

curl -0 -v -X POST http://www.example.com/api/users \
-H "Expect:" \
-H 'Content-Type: text/json; charset=utf-8' \
-d \
"
{
    \"field1\": \"test\",
    \"field2\": {
        \"foo\": \"bar\"
    }
}"

For some reason, this Here Document approach strips newlines

@eric-bolinger the reason the Heredoc strips newlines is because you need to tell your Heredoc to preserve newlines by quoting the EOF:

curl -0 -v -X POST http://www.example.com/api/users \
-H "Expect:" \
-H 'Content-Type: text/json; charset=utf-8' \
-d @- <<'EOF'

{
    "field1": "test",
    "field2": {
        "foo": "bar"
    }
}
EOF

Notice the single-ticks surrounding EOF the first time it's defined, but not the second.

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