39

How can I change my current working directory in C++ in a platform-agnostic way?

I found the direct.h header file, which is Windows compatible, and the unistd.h, which is UNIX/POSIX compatible.

  • @noɥʇʎPʎzɐɹC So the standard committee has established a standard required way to change the working directory, circa C++17, via filesystem. pepper_chico's answer already denotes that. filesystem is currently available in g++5.3 and Visual Studio 2015 as an optional include. If that is the environment that you're working in I can write you an answer using #ifdef to make filesystem's access cross platform? – Jonathan Mee Oct 25 '16 at 12:29
  • @JonathanMee if it is good enough, I may do a multiple bounty – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 25 '16 at 22:11
45

The chdir function works on both POSIX (manpage) and Windows (called _chdir there but an alias chdir exists).

Both implementations return zero on success and -1 on error. As you can see in the manpage, more distinguished errno values are possible in the POSIX variant, but that shouldn't really make a difference for most use cases.

  • 3
    So what header would I use for that? unistd? – sparkFinder Aug 14 '10 at 21:43
  • 1
    @sparkFinder, you will usually need to include different headers on different platforms when dealing with nonstandard functions such as chdir(). IIRC, GCC will define _WIN32 when targeting Windows, so you could use that with #include to choose a header. – RBerteig Aug 14 '10 at 22:16
  • 3
    @sparkFinder: You can check for Visual Studio with #ifdef _MSC_VER and then include the direct.h header. If it's not defined, use unistd.h. This should be enough as the other major programming environment on Windows, MinGW, has the unistd header. – AndiDog Aug 15 '10 at 14:24
  • 2
    chdir on windows is deprecated. – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 20 '16 at 20:56
  • 1
    @dbush _chdir != chdir _chdir is not cross platform while chdir is deprecated. – Jonathan Mee Oct 24 '16 at 16:21
15

For C++, boost::filesystem::current_path (setter and getter prototypes).

A file system library based on Boost.Filesystem will be added to the standard.

8

Does chdir() do what you want? It works under both POSIX and Windows.

8
+100

This cross-platform sample code for changing the working directory using POSIX chdir and MS _chdir as recommend in this answer. Likewise for determining the current working directory, the analogous getcwd and _getcwd are used.

These platform differences are hidden behind the macros cd and cwd.

As per the documentation, chdir's signature is int chdir(const char *path) where path is absolute or relative. chdir will return 0 on success. getcwd is slightly more complicated because it needs (in one variant) a buffer to store the fetched path in as seen in char *getcwd(char *buf, size_t size). It returns NULL on failure and a pointer to the same passed buffer on success. The code sample makes use of this returned char pointer directly.

The sample is based on @MarcD's but corrects a memory leak. Additionally, I strove for concision, no dependencies, and only basic failure/error checking as well as ensuring it works on multiple (common) platforms.

I tested it on OSX 10.11.6, Centos7, and Win10. For OSX & Centos, I used g++ changedir.cpp -o changedir to build and ran as ./changedir <path>.

On Win10, I built with cl.exe changedir.cpp /EHsc /nologo.

MVP solution

$ cat changedir.cpp

#ifdef _WIN32
#include <direct.h>
// MSDN recommends against using getcwd & chdir names
#define cwd _getcwd
#define cd _chdir
#else
#include "unistd.h"
#define cwd getcwd
#define cd chdir
#endif

#include <iostream>

char buf[4096]; // never know how much is needed

int main(int argc , char** argv) {

  if (argc > 1) {
    std::cout  << "CWD: " << cwd(buf, sizeof buf) << std::endl;

    // Change working directory and test for success
    if (0 == cd(argv[1])) {
      std::cout << "CWD changed to: " << cwd(buf, sizeof buf) << std::endl;
    }
  } else {
    std::cout << "No directory provided" << std::endl;
  }

  return 0;
}

OSX Listing:

$ g++ changedir.c -o changedir
$ ./changedir testing
CWD: /Users/Phil
CWD changed to: /Users/Phil/testing

Centos Listing:

$ g++ changedir.c -o changedir
$ ./changedir
No directory provided
$ ./changedir does_not_exist
CWD: /home/phil
$ ./changedir Music
CWD: /home/phil
CWD changed to: /home/phil/Music
$ ./changedir /
CWD: /home/phil
CWD changed to: /

Win10 Listing

cl.exe changedir.cpp /EHsc /nologo
changedir.cpp

c:\Users\Phil> changedir.exe test
CWD: c:\Users\Phil
CWD changed to: c:\Users\Phil\test

Note: OSX uses clang and Centos gnu gcc behind g++.

  • 1
    ooh, you put a lot of effort into this. You're leading on my list! – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 25 '16 at 3:18
  • Shorter than with libraries, and clean and neat. Provide a clear explanation of how to set and get the cwd, it's a bit vague right now. – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 25 '16 at 3:21
  • @noɥʇʎPʎzɐɹC let me know if the update isn't clear to you. – Phil Oct 26 '16 at 16:57
5

You want chdir(2). If you are trying to have your program change the working directory of your shell - you can't. There are plenty of answers on SO already addressing that problem.

5

Did you mean C or C++? They are completely different languages.

In C, the standard that defines the language doesn't cover directories. Many platforms that support directories have a chdir function that takes a char* or const char* argument, but even where it exists the header where it's declared is not standard. There may also be subtleties as to what the argument means (e.g. Windows has per-drive directories).

In C++, googling leads to chdir and _chdir, and suggests that Boost doesn't have an interface to chdir. But I won't comment any further since I don't know C++.

  • In boost::filesystem, there wasn't a "chdir" when I used it last time. – rubber boots Aug 14 '10 at 22:13
  • @rubber: indeed, looking at boost.org/doc/libs/1_34_1/boost/filesystem/operations.hpp suggests that there is a getcwd equivalent but no chdir equivalent. – Gilles Aug 14 '10 at 22:22
  • I could see how one might think C and C++ were completely different languages if they were the only two languages you knew. or if C is the only language you knew – Michael Jan 15 '18 at 23:34
  • @Michael C and C++ have many characteristics in common: they're unsafe, imperative languages. They nonetheless are completely different languages, further apart than, say, C# and Java. It's true that C and C++ have a rather large common subset, but that common subset is almost never good C or good C++. If you think that C is a subset of C++, you're either a bad C programmer, or a bad C++ programmer, or both. – Gilles Jan 15 '18 at 23:55
3

Nice cross-platform way to change current directory in C++ was suggested long time ago by @pepper_chico. This solution uses boost::filesystem::current_path().

To get the current working directory use:

namespace fs = boost::filesystem;
fs::path cur_working_dir(fs::current_path());

To set the current working directory use:

namespace fs = boost::filesystem;
fs::current_path(fs::system_complete( fs::path( "new_working_directory_path" ) ));    

Bellow is the self-contained helper functions:

#include "boost/filesystem/operations.hpp"
#include "boost/filesystem/path.hpp"
#include <string>

namespace fs = boost::filesystem;    

fs::path get_cwd_pth()
{
  return fs::current_path();
}   

std::string get_cwd()
{ 
  return get_cwd_pth().c_str();
} 

void set_cwd(const fs::path& new_wd)
{
  fs::current_path(fs::system_complete( new_wd));
}   

void set_cwd(const std::string& new_wd)
{
  set_cwd( fs::path( new_wd));
}

Here is my complete code-example on how to set/get current working directory:

#include "boost/filesystem/operations.hpp"
#include "boost/filesystem/path.hpp"
#include <iostream>

namespace fs = boost::filesystem;

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
  fs::path full_path;
  if ( argc > 1 )
  {
    full_path = fs::system_complete( fs::path( argv[1] ) );
  }  
  else
  {
    std::cout << "Usage:   tcd [path]" << std::endl;
  }

  if ( !fs::exists( full_path ) )
  {
    std::cout << "Not found: " << full_path.c_str() << std::endl;
    return 1;
  }

  if ( !fs::is_directory( full_path ))
  {
    std::cout << "Provided path is not a directory: " << full_path.c_str() << std::endl;
    return 1;
  }

  std::cout << "Old current working directory: " << boost::filesystem::current_path().c_str() << std::endl;

  fs::current_path(full_path);

  std::cout << "New current working directory: " << boost::filesystem::current_path().c_str() << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

If boost installed on your system you can use the following command to compile this sample:

g++ -o tcd app.cpp -lboost_filesystem -lboost_system
  • give a clean and isolated one-liner for changing and viewing the current working directory. – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 24 '16 at 22:01
  • @noɥʇʎPʎzɐɹC I've updated the answer, please check. – Nikita Oct 24 '16 at 22:10
  • 1
    @noɥʇʎPʎzɐɹC Added several helper functions to work both with std::string and boost::filesystem::path. – Nikita Oct 24 '16 at 22:31
  • 1
    @noɥʇʎPʎzɐɹC Not a problem, names updated to comply with boost naming and typical C++ code-style. – Nikita Oct 24 '16 at 22:54
  • 1
    @noɥʇʎPʎzɐɹC Thnx, changes accepted. I also shorten a variable names there. – Nikita Oct 24 '16 at 23:13
2

Can't believe no one has claimed the bounty on this one yet!!!

Here is a cross platform implementation that gets and changes the current working directory using C++. All it takes is a little macro magic, to read the value of argv[0], and to define a few small functions.

Here is the code to change directories to the location of the executable file that is running currently. It can easily be adapted to change the current working directory to any directory you want.

Code :

  #ifdef _WIN32
     #include "direct.h"
     #define PATH_SEP '\\'
     #define GETCWD _getcwd
     #define CHDIR _chdir
  #else
     #include "unistd.h"
     #define PATH_SEP '/'
     #define GETCWD getcwd
     #define CHDIR chdir
  #endif

  #include <cstring>
  #include <string>
  #include <iostream>
  using std::cout;
  using std::endl;
  using std::string;

  string GetExecutableDirectory(const char* argv0) {
     string path = argv0;
     int path_directory_index = path.find_last_of(PATH_SEP);
     return path.substr(0 , path_directory_index + 1);
  }

  bool ChangeDirectory(const char* dir) {return CHDIR(dir) == 0;}

  string GetCurrentWorkingDirectory() {
     const int BUFSIZE = 4096;
     char buf[BUFSIZE];
     memset(buf , 0 , BUFSIZE);
     GETCWD(buf , BUFSIZE - 1);
     return buf;
  }

  int main(int argc , char** argv) {

     cout << endl << "Current working directory was : " << GetCurrentWorkingDirectory() << endl;
     cout << "Changing directory..." << endl;

     string exedir = GetExecutableDirectory(argv[0]);
     ChangeDirectory(exedir.c_str());

     cout << "Current working directory is now : " << GetCurrentWorkingDirectory() << endl;

     return 0;
  }

Output :

c:\Windows>c:\ctwoplus\progcode\test\CWD\cwd.exe

Current working directory was : c:\Windows Changing directory... Current working directory is now : c:\ctwoplus\progcode\test\CWD

c:\Windows>

  • Good example. But clean up and shorten your code and it will be yours. – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 23 '16 at 14:33
  • @ noɥʇʎPʎzɐɹC How's that? I shortened it a bit and cleaned it up. Can't shorten it much more. – MarcD Oct 23 '16 at 16:51
  • Cleaned it up a bit. I'll test it and put an example run for posix and then you'll get the bounty. :) – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 23 '16 at 18:53
  • 1
    did a mini code review: gist.github.com/CrazyPython/152805717b1c01649f0efed3415001e0 (it doesn't work on unix) – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Oct 23 '16 at 18:59
  • It works as expected. What do you want it to do? but doesn't escape it gets converted to a string – MarcD Oct 23 '16 at 19:04

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