1

I have been playing around with some code and noticed that if I have an if statement which kind of does the same thing twice, I was wondering whether java had any implementation to do the opposite of a certain action.

if(id == 1) {
   partnerID = 3;
} else if(id == 2) {
   partnerID = 4;
} else if (id == 3) {
   partnerID = 1;
} else {
   partnerID = 2;
}

As you can see, if id is 1 then the partner id is 3 and visa versa.

  • 2
    use a switch for starters. – Mohammed Aouf Zouag Jan 18 '16 at 18:21
  • well I know about switch statements, but its just has clunky and ugly @MohammedAoufZOUAG – user5657755 Jan 18 '16 at 18:22
  • @GeorgeMulligan that's a bit too complicated especially in this case. – Meinkraft Jan 18 '16 at 18:34
  • @TheProgrammerG Removed the comment because it didn't really answer the question anyways. However, a Map approach would be much easier to read instead of the current answers IMO especially if there were to be more ids and partners as I mentioned. – George Mulligan Jan 18 '16 at 18:40
  • Sorry I should have stated, there are only 4 ids max @GeorgeMulligan – user5657755 Jan 18 '16 at 18:41
4

No, java doesn't have this kind of "opposite action". But you can do some simple math:

   if(id == 1 || id == 3){
       partnerID = 4 - id;
   }else if(id == 2 || id == 4){
       partnerID = 6 - id;
   }
1

You can use a lookup table.

private static final int[] ID_TO_PARTNER_ID = [ 2, 3, 4, 1 ];

static int partnerIdForId(int id) {
  return 0 <= id && id < ID_TO_PARTNER_ID.length
      ? ID_TO_PARTNER_ID[id]
      : 2;
}
  • Thanks for the answer, is this deemed a more appropriate approach to the situation or is it something which is not really necessary. – user5657755 Jan 18 '16 at 18:26
  • 2
    I think this is a bit more complicated than needed. – Mohammed Aouf Zouag Jan 18 '16 at 18:27
  • 2
    @chrylis it's clear. The OP wants a clearer approach to the "ugly" if statements. – Meinkraft Jan 18 '16 at 18:28
  • 1
    The original is more readable even if it has a couple of extra lines of code. – Mick Mnemonic Jan 18 '16 at 18:28
  • 3
    @chrylis it is perfectly clear. Personally the other answer makes more sense to me than this one. With this one, you need to attach a JavaDoc comment.. – Mohammed Aouf Zouag Jan 18 '16 at 18:29
0

Using Java 8 and Optional, you can assign partnerID in a functional way. The swap() operation is encapsulated and parametrized, which eliminates duplication of numerical constants 1, 2, 3, 4. The problem though is to return both logical and numerical output of the operation. We have to know if a condition has been met, and we need the result of the swap. This could be done by returning null, but with Optional it becomes more elegant.

int partnerID = swap(1, 3, id).map(Optional::of)
       .orElse(swap(2, 4, id)).map(Optional::of)
       .orElse(Optional.of(defaultPartnerId)).get();

private static Optional<Integer> swap(int a, int b, int x) {
    if (x != a && x != b) return Optional.empty();
    return Optional.of(a + b - x);
}
  • Thanks for the answer, but way too complex for whats needed – user5657755 Jan 19 '16 at 14:04

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