246

Variable used in lambda expression should be final or effectively final

When I try to use calTz it is showing this error.

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal, TimeZone calTz) {
    try {
        cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component -> {
            VTimeZone v = (VTimeZone) component;
            v.getTimeZoneId();
            if (calTz == null) {
                calTz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue());
            }
        });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return null;
}
6
  • 10
    You can't modify calTz from the lambda. Jan 18, 2016 at 22:46
  • 8
    I assumed this was one of those things that just didn't get done in time for Java 8. But Java 8 was 2014. Scala and Kotlin have allowed this for years, so it's obviously possible. Is Java ever planning to eliminate this weird restriction? Sep 20, 2018 at 22:00
  • 6
    Here is the updated link to @M.S.Dousti 's comment. Oct 31, 2018 at 21:31
  • I think you could use Completable Futures as a workaround.
    – λraulain
    Feb 15, 2019 at 13:48
  • 1
    One important thing I observed - You can use static variables instead of normal variables (This makes it effectively final I guess) Mar 29, 2020 at 5:47

9 Answers 9

242

Although other answers prove the requirement, they don't explain why the requirement exists.

The JLS mentions why in §15.27.2:

The restriction to effectively final variables prohibits access to dynamically-changing local variables, whose capture would likely introduce concurrency problems.

To lower risk of bugs, they decided to ensure captured variables are never mutated.


This also applies for anonymous inner classes

6
  • 28
    Good answer +1, and I'm surprised by how little coverage the reason for effectively final seems to get. Of note: A local variable can only be captured by a lambda if it is also definitely assigned before the body of the lambda. Both requirements would seem to ensure that accessing the local variable would be thread safe. Sep 14, 2018 at 9:09
  • 9
    any idea why this is restricted only to local variables, and not class members? I find myself often circumventing the problem by declaring my variable as a class member... Mar 5, 2019 at 10:15
  • 13
    @DavidRefaeli Class members are covered/affected by the memory model, which if followed, will produce predictable results when shared. Local variables are not, as mentioned in §17.4.1
    – Vince
    Mar 5, 2019 at 14:08
  • 3
    This is a BS reason to handicap lamdas in such a way. If you don't understand multi-threading, you might get bit, but you'll probably also learn something.
    – Josh M.
    Mar 11, 2021 at 3:49
  • 1
    Also note that with anonymous inner class (the effective predecessor to lambdas introduced in Java 8), non-final local variables cannot be accessed either.
    – wlnirvana
    Jun 10, 2022 at 4:27
108

A final variable means that it can be instantiated only one time. in Java you can't reassign non-final local variables in lambda as well as in anonymous inner classes.

You can refactor your code with the old for-each loop:

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal,TimeZone calTz) {
    try {
        for(Component component : cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE")) {
        VTimeZone v = (VTimeZone) component;
           v.getTimeZoneId();
           if(calTz==null) {
               calTz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue());
           }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return null;
}

Even if I don't get the sense of some pieces of this code:

  • you call a v.getTimeZoneId(); without using its return value
  • with the assignment calTz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue()); you don't modify the originally passed calTz and you don't use it in this method
  • You always return null, why don't you set void as return type?

Hope also these tips helps you to improve.

4
  • we can use non final static variables Apr 26, 2020 at 13:50
  • @FracescoPitzalis can you post the complete java working example with public static void main method for above example Jul 4, 2022 at 18:04
  • @NarendraJaggi can you post the java working example with public static void main method for above example Jul 4, 2022 at 18:14
  • I ran the code and in getting errors Jul 5, 2022 at 11:22
105

From a lambda, you can't get a reference to anything that isn't final. You need to declare a final wrapper from outside the lamda to hold your variable.

I've added the final 'reference' object as this wrapper.

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal,TimeZone calTz) {
    final AtomicReference<TimeZone> reference = new AtomicReference<>();

    try {
       cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component->{
        VTimeZone v = (VTimeZone) component;
           v.getTimeZoneId();
           if(reference.get()==null) {
               reference.set(TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue()));
           }
           });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        //log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return reference.get();
}   
6
  • I was thinking about the same or similar approach - but I would like to see some expert advise/feedback on this answer?
    – YoYo
    Dec 5, 2017 at 16:03
  • 5
    This code miss an initial reference.set(calTz); or the reference must be created using new AtomicReference<>(calTz), otherwise the non-null TimeZone provided as parameter will be lost. May 6, 2018 at 20:31
  • 16
    This should be the first answer. An AtomicReference (or similar Atomic___ class) works around this limitation safely in every possible circumstance. Sep 20, 2018 at 22:21
  • 1
    Agreed, this should be the accepted answer. The other answers give useful information on how to fall back to a non-functional programming model, and on why this was done, but don't actually tell you how to work around the problem! Aug 30, 2019 at 20:53
  • 7
    @GlenPeterson and is a terrible decision too, not only it is a lot slower this way, but you are also ignoring the side-effects property that the documentation mandates.
    – Eugene
    Oct 23, 2019 at 17:13
61

Java 8 has a new concept called “Effectively final” variable. It means that a non-final local variable whose value never changes after initialization is called “Effectively Final”.

This concept was introduced because prior to Java 8, we could not use a non-final local variable in an anonymous class. If you wanna have access to a local variable in anonymous class, you have to make it final.

When lambda was introduced, this restriction was eased. Hence to the need to make local variable final if it’s not changed once it is initialized as lambda in itself is nothing but an anonymous class.

Java 8 realized the pain of declaring local variable final every time a developer used lambda, introduced this concept, and made it unnecessary to make local variables final. So if you see the rule for anonymous classes has not changed, it’s just you don’t have to write the final keyword every time when using lambdas.

I found a good explanation here

2
13

In your example, you can replace the forEach with lamdba with a simple for loop and modify any variable freely. Or, probably, refactor your code so that you don't need to modify any variables. However, I'll explain for completeness what does the error mean and how to work around it.

Java 8 Language Specification, §15.27.2:

Any local variable, formal parameter, or exception parameter used but not declared in a lambda expression must either be declared final or be effectively final (§4.12.4), or a compile-time error occurs where the use is attempted.

Basically you cannot modify a local variable (calTz in this case) from within a lambda (or a local/anonymous class). To achieve that in Java, you have to use a mutable object and modify it (via a final variable) from the lambda. One example of a mutable object here would be an array of one element:

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal, TimeZone calTz) {
    TimeZone[] result = { null };
    try {
        cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component -> {
            ...
            result[0] = ...;
            ...
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return result[0];
}
1
  • Another way is to use a field of an object. E.g. MyObj result = new MyObj(); ...; result.timeZone = ...; ....; return result.timezone; Note though, that as explained above, this exposes you to thread-safety problems. See stackoverflow.com/a/50341404/7092558 May 13, 2020 at 5:56
4

to answer to > Variable used in lambda expression should be final or effectively final JAVA

to workaround that in not an elegant way , 2 issues : the side effect and the threading issue

final AtomicInteger e = new AtomicInteger(0);
        new Thread(() -> {
            e.addAndGet(1);
        });

to be more precise, i agree is kind of the same but the idea behind using Lambda function is to avoid side affect, and when we are accessing this final reference in the lambda function to populate the value to get the result from outside, we are breaking this concept.

in the oldest post you might want to rewrite like that

cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").streams().map(v->v.getTimeZoneId().getValue()).collect(Collectors.toList());

and for the threading aspect , we have the same issue with the side effect and additionally you will never know when to access to the Atomic variable to collect the result , you could put a CountDownLatch ... Better to work with CompletableFuture to handle the result and the synchronization aspect

3
  • here the functional interface is imposed as a runable , it would have been better to use CompletableFuture Jan 19, 2022 at 12:55
  • not sure the oldest answer is correct , worth to use a stream and map the items in VTimeZone , filter them as non null and collect them in a list Jan 19, 2022 at 12:57
  • 1
    As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Jan 19, 2022 at 13:24
3

A variable used in lambda expression should be a final or effectively final, but you can assign a value to a final one element array.

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal, TimeZone calTz) {
    try {
        TimeZone calTzLocal[] = new TimeZone[1];
        calTzLocal[0] = calTz;
        cal.getComponents().get("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component -> {
            TimeZone v = component;
            v.getTimeZoneId();
            if (calTzLocal[0] == null) {
                calTzLocal[0] = TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue());
            }
        });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return null;
}
6
  • This is very similar to the suggestion by Alexander Udalov. Apart from that I think this approach is relying on side-effects.
    – Scratte
    Apr 8, 2020 at 15:55
  • @Scratte can you post the java working example with public static void main method for above example Jul 4, 2022 at 18:22
  • @deepakl.2000 That wouldn't add anything new compared to this post. It would get deleted.
    – Scratte
    Jul 4, 2022 at 19:23
  • @Scratte how should i execute the code in this post. Please advice Jul 5, 2022 at 3:35
  • @deepakl.2000 This isn't the place, really. How to call a method in Java: Put it in class, call it from a main method with the two parameters (that you create). Make it static, if you don't want to insatiate an object. Modify it to return calTzLocal[1] if all goes well.
    – Scratte
    Jul 5, 2022 at 7:50
1

if it is not necessary to modify the variable than a general workaround for this kind of problem would be to extract the part of code which use lambda and use final keyword on method-parameter.

0

You can't re-assign the variable with new reference inside a lambda expression which is coming from outside scope of lambda.But you can certainly modify existing state of the object.So instead re-assigning 'calTz' to new reference.You can call setter methods on it to change its internal state.So this will work(if your VtimeZone is mutatble only):

    calTz=new TimeZone();    
cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component -> {
                         VTimeZone v = (VTimeZone) component;
                    v.getTimeZoneId();
                    
                        calTz.setTimeZoneId("some value");
                    
                })

.But this is not a good practice. Above code can also be replaced by.

        if(calTz == null){
    calTz=new TimeZone();
cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").get(0).setTimeZoneId("some value");}

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