88

Variable used in lambda expression should be final or effectively final

When I try to use calTz it is showing this error.

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal,TimeZone calTz) {
    try {
       cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component->{
        VTimeZone v = (VTimeZone) component;
           v.getTimeZoneId();
           if(calTz==null) {
               calTz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue());
           }
           });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return null;
}
  • 3
    You can't modify calTz from the lambda. – Elliott Frisch Jan 18 '16 at 22:46
  • Check out this excellent post by Bruce Eckel on how Java 8 Lambdas are different from (Python) Closures, and why you can pass them only values as opposed to variables. – M.S. Dousti May 21 '17 at 12:30
  • I assumed this was one of those things that just didn't get done in time for Java 8. But Java 8 was 2014. Scala and Kotlin have allowed this for years, so it's obviously possible. Is Java ever planning to eliminate this weird restriction? – GlenPeterson Sep 20 '18 at 22:00
  • 2
    Here is the updated link to @M.S.Dousti 's comment. – geisterfurz007 Oct 31 '18 at 21:31
  • I think you could use Completable Futures as a workaround. – Kraulain Feb 15 at 13:48
52

A final variable means that it can be instantiated only one time. in Java you can't use non-final variables in lambda as well as in anonymous inner classes.

You can refactor your code with the old for-each loop:

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal,TimeZone calTz) {
    try {
        for(Component component : cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE")) {
        VTimeZone v = (VTimeZone) component;
           v.getTimeZoneId();
           if(calTz==null) {
               calTz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue());
           }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return null;
}

Even if I don't get the sense of some pieces of this code:

  • you call a v.getTimeZoneId(); without using its return value
  • with the assignment calTz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue()); you don't modify the originally passed calTz and you don't use it in this method
  • You always return null, why don't you set void as return type?

Hope also these tips helps you to improve.

50

Although other answers prove the requirement, they don't explain why the requirement exists.

The JLS mentions why in §15.27.2:

The restriction to effectively final variables prohibits access to dynamically-changing local variables, whose capture would likely introduce concurrency problems.

To lower risk of bugs, they decided to ensure captured variables are never mutated.

  • 8
    Good answer +1, and I'm surprised by how little coverage the reason for effectively final seems to get. Of note: A local variable can only be captured by a lambda if it is also definitely assigned before the body of the lambda. Both requirements would seem to ensure that accessing the local variable would be thread safe. – Tim Biegeleisen Sep 14 '18 at 9:09
  • 1
    any idea why this is restricted only to local variables, and not class members? I find myself often circumventing the problem by declaring my variable as a class member... – David Refaeli Mar 5 at 10:15
  • 2
    @DavidRefaeli Class members are covered/affected by the memory model, which if followed, will produce predictable results when shared. Local variables are not, as mentioned in §17.4.1 – Vince Emigh Mar 5 at 14:08
41

From a lambda, you can't get a reference to anything that isn't final. You need to declare a final wrapper from outside the lamda to hold your variable.

I've added the final 'reference' object as this wrapper.

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal,TimeZone calTz) {
    final AtomicReference<TimeZone> reference = new AtomicReference<>();

    try {
       cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component->{
        VTimeZone v = (VTimeZone) component;
           v.getTimeZoneId();
           if(reference.get()==null) {
               reference.set(TimeZone.getTimeZone(v.getTimeZoneId().getValue()));
           }
           });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        //log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return reference.get();
}   
  • I was thinking about the same or similar approach - but I would like to see some expert advise/feedback on this answer? – YoYo Dec 5 '17 at 16:03
  • 3
    This code miss an initial reference.set(calTz); or the reference must be created using new AtomicReference<>(calTz), otherwise the non-null TimeZone provided as parameter will be lost. – Julien Kronegg May 6 '18 at 20:31
  • 3
    This should be the first answer. An AtomicReference (or similar Atomic___ class) works around this limitation safely in every possible circumstance. – GlenPeterson Sep 20 '18 at 22:21
31

Java 8 has a new concept called “Effectively final” variable. It means that a non-final local variable whose value never changes after initialization is called “Effectively Final”.

This concept was introduced because prior to Java 8, we could not use a non-final local variable in an anonymous class. If you wanna have access to a local variable in anonymous class, you have to make it final.

When lambda was introduced, this restriction was eased. Hence to the need to make local variable final if it’s not changed once it is initialized as lambda in itself is nothing but an anonymous class.

Java 8 realized the pain of declaring local variable final every time developer used lambda and introduced this concept and made it unnecessary to make local variables final. So if you see the rule for anonymous class still not changed, it’s just you don’t have to write final keyword every time when using lambdas.

I found a good explanation here

6

In your example, you can replace the forEach with lamdba with a simple for loop and modify any variable freely. Or, probably, refactor your code so that you don't need to modify any variables. However, I'll explain for completeness what does the error mean and how to work around it.

Java 8 Language Specification, §15.27.2:

Any local variable, formal parameter, or exception parameter used but not declared in a lambda expression must either be declared final or be effectively final (§4.12.4), or a compile-time error occurs where the use is attempted.

Basically you cannot modify a local variable (calTz in this case) from within a lambda (or a local/anonymous class). To achieve that in Java, you have to use a mutable object and modify it (via a final variable) from the lambda. One example of a mutable object here would be an array of one element:

private TimeZone extractCalendarTimeZoneComponent(Calendar cal, TimeZone calTz) {
    TimeZone[] result = { null };
    try {
        cal.getComponents().getComponents("VTIMEZONE").forEach(component -> {
            ...
            result[0] = ...;
            ...
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.warn("Unable to determine ical timezone", e);
    }
    return result[0];
}
0

if it is not necessary to modify the variable than a general workaround for this kind of problem would be to extract the part of code which use lambda and use final keyword on method-parameter.

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